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Foredom or Dremel Fortiflex ?


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Hi Guys, I am thinking of getting a pendant drill but as there seems to be two makes available (at least here into U.K.)

would. I would appreciate any comments you might have in respect of these makes, pro's & con's ?

 

Many Thanks

 

Martin. 

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Hi Martin, I have just received a Foredom (Xmas present).  Yet to put it to serious work but I am very happy with it; well made, well powered (more than you will need for model decorations unless carving solid hulls), and looks solid :).  The only small disappointment is that the flex shaft is just a bitt short, another 200mm would have helped (for me anyway).  The flexshaft is considerably heavier in the Foredom (than the dremel) so you need to have the motor high enough to take some of the flex-shaft (plus handgrip/tool) weight.  That is where for me at least, that little extra length would have helped balance it a bit more.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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  • 2 weeks later...

Another thing to think about is with foredom you can switch out the heads quickly. Pop on pop off. Also foredom has a pop on head set up with a small flex head set up that is great.

Does the dremel have a pop on pop off head?

Also I have worked at least 2 dremels (hand held) to death and I don't think that I could do that with a foredom. Do a lot of metal work also.

 

Later 42rocker

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I've been using the Foredom for years in my other hobby (bird carving).  I would recommend the SR model, which allows you to change the direction of the spin.  There are several handpiece choices available as well, which adds to the utility of the tool..  

 

Frank

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There are two types of heads that can be used (US fittings) or (European) but the motor units are different. And these are sub-divided, there are about 20 different heads for the US variant and 9 I believe for the European type.

So as they say "you pay your money and take your chances".

One to think about.......

Martin.

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foredom is for big work, model ship building is not big work

flexshaft is not desirable it is always a nuisance to work

 

rotary micromotor  are much more easier to control without the rigidity of a shaft and they are much lighter

here is an example therea are many other kinds price begins around $100 and over

 

 

http://www.gessweincanada.com/category-s/10555.htm

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Gaetan is correct, a micro motor system is much easier to control.  The Foredom has more torque and is better for removing large amounts of stock.  I use both.  Another advantage of the Foredom is that you can set it up in a jig and use it for routing and milling.

 

If you're looking for a rotary tool for small work, then the micro motor would be the better choice.  Gesswein tools are very high quality (I have the Marathon Handy 700), but are very expensive.  Woodcarving sites have other manufacturers to choose from - here's a link to an example:

 

http://www.woodcarverssupply.com/NEW-MICRO-PRO-CHAMPION-SET/productinfo/793800/

 

Frank

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  • 2 weeks later...

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