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This may sound strange, but while doing the simulated caulking of the deck on my Harley almost a Harvey, I started wondering if the eye-liner products (for women) could do the same job as a graphite pen.

I have found that both the products are smearing if not being careful, but the eye-liner will do a better covering in one stroke.

Will update later with pictures. But this truly works! :)

And considering all the Admirals in our Forum it's time for you to open up the make-up boxes. You have a great tool nearby!

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 I cut my plaking strips and then use diluted glue (the consistancy of coffee) to glue them, in batches, long edge down on a thin piece of paper, like a stationary store sopping bag and then glue a thin strip across one of the short edges. After it dries well, the paper and wood soak up the dilluted glue nicely, I use my thinest blade and cut each plank away from the sheet, leaving one long and one short edge with a thin laminant of paper. I a use plain brown bag, but I suppose any thin paper would do. After that, you just plank keeping the laminated edges going in the same direction.

 It sands and finishes without incident. The finish will also highlight the paper at that stage. It's not really much work for an actual effect.

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 Please pardon me if I sounded like I know what I'm doing. I've never built any kind of model before now; though I've planked a lot of decks and floors.

 I found an old AL Virginia Schooner kit, and some free time, and decided to give it a try.

 I didn't think much of the instructions or the kit parts so I've been improvising my way through it; stumbeling, is more like it.

 When I got to the decking, I was copying the way prefab decks are made by attaching the caulk joint to the plank ahead of installation. At the end of the day, they use an adhesive and vacume bag system to bind them into a panel, which goes to the boat rough fit. It's a cheat, sort of, but a big time saver on the boat. The quality is there, too.

 

Regards,

Steve

post-11706-0-18599300-1398199503_thumb.jpg

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 Ulises,

  The prefab decking that I referred to is a process, I believe first incorporated as a manufacturing process, by a company called Teak Deckers, out of Sarasota, Fl. They go to a boat and make doorskin (1/8th luan ply wood) templates of the decks and ways and bring them back to the factory to make deck "panels". They leave the outside planks uncaulked, and the king and scallop planks out. When they bring the completed panels to the boat, they finish fit them, fit the king plank, and caulk the few panel seams and edges remaining. Two people can do in a day, what would normally take a week or more. The advantage, besides time, is less work or opertunities to damage something on the boat (the two are synonymous on boats), and an easy clean up without much dust. You can also make very fine listellos, and inlays in a more controled, ergonomic enviornment.

 I've done them this way and the conventional way. The conventional way is fun, but prefab is cleaner, allows more artistic flexibility and, of course, is much easier on the back and knees. You also need less tools and room.

 As far as what I did, Nigel seems to have put more thought into it, than I, to a fine result.

 Below, is just a quick set up for some hatch planks, with perhaps too much glue in my hatse to answer your question, just to show you my crude method.

Once dry, I trim the paper up and draw a thin, sharp blade down through the laminated width edge and back along the plank to the end. It's really very little trouble and I'm surprisd that this is actually news to anyone.

 The paper will take a dark color with most finish or stain that you put on it, in the end.

 

Regards,

Steve

post-11706-0-61986600-1398259968_thumb.jpg

Edited by shoule
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To Chris's comments above: I suppose you are right.

 Things evolve, though, with notions and ideas over time. Who know what criteria they will focus on in ship modeling in another hundred years.

 Me, I'm looking at my first project as the boat builder that I am. Like Nigel, I wanted something to make the planks look individual and on purpose. As a boat builder, I would also caulk because when water gets trapped under the planks, the resulting decay would spread and undermine the structural integrity that I worked so hard for. Also there's also a need to plan for expansion and contraction, lest the planks loosen themselves over time. And, of course, leaks.

 Even now, in the age of composite construction, great care is given to seal every nook and cranny and provide a way for water to run aft and outboard, so that it doesn't stand.

 Is it necessary on a model, no, and to scale might not be even noticeable, but it's a detail that you can be proud of, if you choose, and one that was likely on the plate of the guy who built the boat that the model represents.

 But, alas, I'm a novice at best. I've only just graduated from "Lurker" and I will likely never reach the abilities of many here. Perhaps I'll go in a different direction, next time.

 

 

Steve

Edited by shoule
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Nice video here 

http://www.boat-building.org/learn-skills/index.php/en/wood/caulking-decks-and-hulls/

showing actual caulking. There are others

 

Regarding tar dont think of what we call tar today as being the same thing  - pitch may be closer. But by various boilings and additives the material can be given a wide ranges of properties and can fairly soft or be rendered more like a paint or a varnish after it dries/sets.

 

But before it sets it can be liquid enough to soak into oakum and rope.

Edited by SpyGlass
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I've seen this gorgeous model Nigel - thanks for sharing !  As you've mentioned - its up to the builder to determine his/her own style.  On my Confederacy build I completely borrowed/stole Frolich's approach.  When I get to my next build - Im hoping to create my own style.  I do know this - I'm going to scale up - either 1/36 or 1/32 (which again seriously wondering why I haven't seen a ship depicted in 1/32 scale)

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  • 2 months later...

I have tried a number of methods of simulating caulking. I found that pencil graphite smudged too much when sanded. I used the marker pen method for a while - it worked OK. I've now come up with a quicker and (I think easier) method. Purchase a liquid shoe polish (in the colour of your choice) but get one with the foam applicator on the end.

 

Load the shoe polish into the foam applicator by squeezing the bottle while holding the foam applicator in a tissue. Mount the polish bottle (foam applicator end up) in a vice so that it is stable and slide the plank along the foam applicator - I find I have more control if I slide the plank along the foam rather than the foam along the plank (don't push down on the plank or the polish will go onto the face of the plank) The polish dries very quickly so you can glue it to the deck immediately. I only `caulk' one side and one end of each plank.

 

post-1505-0-13106200-1405127063_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-1505-0-91616900-1405127080_thumb.jpg

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  • 1 year later...

Perfectly built model without any "simulated" caulking.  

 

http://5500.forumactif.org/t671-modele-le-gros-ventre-au-1-36-par-gbesson

 

Wow, I've just seen this posting - and unfortunately clicked on the link.

 

Oh my goodness, and I thought I was doing pretty well with my model - this is on another planet - the detailing is incredible.

 

In awe

John

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This may sound strange, but while doing the simulated caulking of the deck on my Harley almost a Harvey, I started wondering if the eye-liner products (for women) could do the same job as a graphite pen.

I have found that both the products are smearing if not being careful, but the eye-liner will do a better covering in one stroke.

Will update later with pictures. But this truly works! :)

And considering all the Admirals in our Forum it's time for you to open up the make-up boxes. You have a great tool nearby!

We never heard about Nirvana's experiment that I am aware of.

So I tried it with one of my admiral's eye liner and compared it to a marking pen on two pieces of the same planking wood.

 

Revlon does not excite me. The results are hardly any different in application and results. I didn't even take a picture.

There have been numerous suggestions here (and I won't go into what I use), so I will leave it up to 'what ever works for you'.

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My nicest looking planking has resulted from gluing the tissue paper to the storck then slicing off planks of the proper thickness. See Remco's link here http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/410-hms-sphynx-by-alex-m-scale-148-english-20-gun-frigate-as-build-1775/?p=4274. The only problem is that the stock must be thicker than the widest plank and premium grade holly is hard to find these days.

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I've seen a technique were a black thread, washed in diluted glue, was laid in after the the run of planking was complete (fore to aft). The the next line of planking was laid against the thread and so on. The ends of the planks were touched with black marker on one end only.
Has anyone employed this technique? Seems that this would give a clean none smearing line.

Mark

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I have looked at the photos from the HMS Sphynx supplied via the link in Greg's posting.

 

The result looks very impressive - however I am wondering if the technique only works on larger scale models as in this 1/48 one.

 

Do you think it would be too much on, for example, a 1/64 model where teh 'soft pencil' or 'marker pen' approach tends to be used?

 

John

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I've seen a technique were a black thread, washed in diluted glue, was laid in after the the run of planking was complete (fore to aft). The the next line of planking was laid against the thread and so on. The ends of the planks were touched with black marker on one end only.

Has anyone employed this technique? Seems that this would give a clean none smearing line.

 

Mark

I tried it once with bad results. When sanding the threads would come off. Maybe I was doing something wrong.

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Hi,

I use different ways for simulate caulking on the deck it depend of model scale.

post-8878-0-79845700-1447332579_thumb.jpg

Scale 1:100 or more I simple draw caulking lines with black fine liner.S/S Savannach under construction.

post-8878-0-33605700-1447332654_thumb.jpg

Scale 1:75 and around I am coloring the edges of veneer strips for deck planking with black permanent marker.

Friesland under construction.

post-8878-0-36637800-1447332732_thumb.jpg

post-8878-0-51237800-1447332844_thumb.jpg

Scale 1:48 and less I made caulking as black thread glued between deck planks.Golden Yacht.

 

Tadeusz

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