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Nirvana

18th Century Longboat by Nirvana - Finished

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Group,

 

I have all the material for the build of the longboat, even the nice boxwood from Jeff Hayes and HobbyMill.

However, I have a question with this before I get head into it.

The sheet holding bulkhead and keel is very heavy chard from the laser cutting.

In the attached picture I have gone over the sheets with a 400 grit paper, don't want to do to much.

But the chard remains.

post-967-0-72397400-1398463811_thumb.jpg

Has anyone else experienced this and how was your approach to get a clean surface?

 

Thank you

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I sanded it away with 240 grit easilly, does it work for you?

 

Congratulations, following the build with interest! I will also start my boxwood longboat build in a month or so :)

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mike,

I don' t want to go over this surface with to coarse sandspaper. But I will try out on other area, before applying your method.

 

Thank you

 

Sent from Nexus7 tablet

Edited by Nirvana

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Per I had about the same and used 320 grit. It take a while but it does come off. I also didn't bother sanding anything except the bulkheads & false keel since I was replacing everything with Boxwood. The False keel need slots of careful sanding.

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I don' t want to go over this surface with to coarse sandspaper.

That wood is quite thick, coarse sandpaper will not sand it away. Also, 240 grit is just to remove the char, then you use higher grits (320 -> 600 -> 1200) to make it smooth and shiny :)

At least, that worked perfectly on pinnace, sister kit for longboat. Will try it on longboat itself in a few weeks, but as far as I remember, the wood is the same, and they are produced on same laser cutter.

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I followed the advice working with a coarser sandpaper to begin with and followed up with 400 grit.

The sheets came out very nice. The discoloration is natural in the wood. Nothing I can do about.post-967-0-09734500-1399683426_thumb.jpg

The upper sheet hasn't had the removal of dust attended yet.

 

The keel and stem piece will be from HobbyMills longboat boxwood upgrade.

I scanned part of the plans and cut out the keel template, attached it to the boxwood sheet and saw it.

The connection notch on the keel was cut out using my very new fine-tooth saw.

post-967-0-42999800-1399683763_thumb.jpg

 

And the final outcome, this without sanding at all.

post-967-0-48617400-1399683892_thumb.jpg

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Per, you know me. When you lack the skill of someone like Chuck all you can do is substitute Power tools. I cut my notch using my Byrnes Sander. yours looks great. I suggest that you cut the stem first. Then if you have any minor flaws in the scarf joint you can match them in the keel.

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Nope....no good.....your piece is not oriented properly with the grain.  That is why they break...rotate so the part of the stem that sticks up and always breaks is going along with the grain....rather than across it.  This is super important and you should always keep teh grain direction in mind when posiitioning your templates.

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If you get the grain right on the stem. You may not need to paint the boxwood with WOP. Boxwood is stronger than Basswood and if the grain is going the correct direction you will not break off the head piece.

Edited by Floyd Kershner

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I followed Chucks' advice and rotated the template, after negotiating the material for some hours I think the picture tells about the outcome.

Yes, I am pleased.post-967-0-09649200-1399833759_thumb.jpg

I know there will be some extra finishing sanding.

Edited by Nirvana

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Per, I must confess I don't understand this picture. This is not the box wood. It is the basswood with the original parts cut with a Laser. I would take one of the stems out of this stencil and lay in on the boxwood so that the grain goes up and down thru the head of the stem. Trace this out then cut. Is this your Boxwood stem? I can't see the grain.

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During the evening I have proceeded with beveling the false keel.

This require magnifier with light in order to get the 1/32" thickness .

It's amazing that a built like this is so much more fascinating and get ones attention to details than others..... ^_^

Could it be, because of Chuck? :)

The instructions take me down to the very basic. Can't see me not succeeding with USF Confederacy.  Thank you Chuck!

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I have found out that the false keel provided from MS does break at the stem.

I have been very sensitive / delicate with sanding but still the stem has broken at two places.

Getting to the point to pondering of replacing the false keel with material from HobbyMills which I already have.

Any input an experience in the stem issue???? :)  Or am I alone?

Thinking about to using  3x 1/32 sheet boxwood to make this part (false keel ) .....

Or should I proceed from the point where I am at and continue?

As for the keel and stem piece out of boxwood, no problems at all!!!!

post-967-0-51623200-1400740463_thumb.jpg

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Per, maybe it's no need to worry?

That parts would be sanded away when the planking is done, so it should not be a big deal, if it do not stop you from installing frames or planking. 

Making false keel of boxwood could be tricky (cuts for frames must be on a precise 90 degrees).

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Since none of the bulkhead has been "attached" making a new false keel and new true stem and keel would be fairly easy as I have the material.

Will see what sanding and  "truing" will do.

post-967-0-94476700-1400741932_thumb.jpg

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Per, maybe it's no need to worry?

That parts would be sanded away when the planking is done, so it should not be a big deal, if it do not stop you from installing frames or planking. 

Making false keel of boxwood could be tricky (cuts for frames must be on a precise 90 degrees).

Mike,

That's one the major concern. Making the false keel.

But since I have the material I could make it a try. What can I loose? Some high quality material from Jeff? Could be worth the shot. :)

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Per - I don't know what to say. I agree with both you and mike about the difficulty of making a good false keel from Boxwood. I was lucky that mine didn't break. It looks like your bulkheads run fine. Do that fit the slots well? maybe just go with it. Crossing my fingers for you.

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Per, It's true that the stem is fragile but I found that once the cap rail is glued in place it's much stronger. Also, the false keel will not be seen on the finished model and as Mike Y said "Making false keel of boxwood could be tricky. . ."  Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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Since eye sighting can be difficult and a camera "doesn't lie", I thought why not use this to it's advantage.

Using the screen on the camera and uploading to any image editing software I found it easy to see where adjustments were needed.

 

The only bulkhead glued in place is 0. Still this one is adjustable.

Using a cloth pin at the stern, the line up started to come out good.post-967-0-61311200-1400902522_thumb.jpg

I am so happy to work this kit, just look at the bulkheads smiley face :)

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After having all the bulkhead into the false keel, I saw something disturbing in the profile and that was how the bulkheads was leaning towards each other.

This is very prominent and obvious after bulkhead B and forward. I have no play (adjustment) at all. It's solid but not glued.

The distance between each bulkhead are all even. Having a feeling the cuts from the material from MS is not accurate.

Has anyone experienced the same?

Don't know how to proceed as planking is next.

Edited by Nirvana

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According to my digital caliper distance between bulkhead A-0-1 is 8.22mm -0- 7.12mm at the false keel, 8.67mm -0- 7.06mm at top.

After measuring the distance between each bulkhead I noticed none are even at center-line. Maybe I should proceed without being to concerned.

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No I would not proceed. The distances should be equal. This is why I created a custom spacer that had the desired width.

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