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Pete Jaquith

Topsail Schooner "Eagle" 1847 - Pete Jaquith - Scratch

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Mike, Tony,

 

Thank you for your interest.  The Topsail Schooner "Eagle" 1847 was an enjoyable build and a great learning experience.  Many of these techniques and the basic construction sequence were applied on my current Brigantine "Newsboy" 1854 build.

 

Regards,

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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Hi Pete,

 

I completely agree with all the posts praising your build. I think it is an amazing and exquisite work of art. As a relative neophyte to model ship building, the fact that it was scratch built blows me away. I saw that this is a repost. How long did it take you? If you could break down the time between research and actual fabrication. I would appreciate it. Thanks.

 

Best,

Steve

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Steve, Jim,

 

Thank you for your interest.

 

The Maine Topsail Schooner "Eagle" 1847 was my 1st scratch build and also a very enjoyable build.  I think that future models of my "American Merchant Sail from the Mid-1800's Series" will be scratch or near scratch build as I have developed a standard build sequence and list of preferred fitting suppliers.

 

Planning for the Topsail "Eagle" build was ~40-60 hours while I built furniture for our New Hampshire house.  Actual construction was ~800 hours spread over roughly one year.  As I was retired at the time, time was reletively free.  Now that I am working again, time is more limited.

 

Regards,

Pete

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Its intersting that the Jib and Flying Jib are sewn in a different pattern using two halves rather than full length strips. Is this an innovation developed in sail making?

Beautiful work!

 

Ken

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Hi Pete,

 

Sorry I some how missed the finish of the Eagle. As always you have produced another wonderful model. :)

I'm sure your friends are thrilled to have it.

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Ken, Michael, Rusty,

 

Thank you for your interest and all the "likes"

 

Ken - the panel arrangement of the flying jibs is typical of what I have found on drawings of mid 1800's merchant sail.

 

Regards,

Pete

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Hi Pete,

 

I hope things are going well with your "real world modeling".

 

I've been making some progress on my BlueJacket Smuggler and I've started a build log: http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/7684-schooner-smuggler-by-perls-bluejacket-scale-148-gloucester-1877/#entry227443. Looking at your build logs has been a major inspiration for me.

 

Actually, I've pretty much decided to follow in your footsteps and stick with 19th century schooners/commercial vessels. I had a chance to buy the Model Shipways Bluenose on sale and it will be my next build. I realize that many will consider it on par with the build difficulty of the Smuggler. However, the Smuggler is my first build and I thought that the Bluenose could help me learn POB and rigging with sails. At the same time, I would capitalize on the rigging experience for schooners I learned from the Smuggler.

 

I'm probably getting way ahead of myself, but after the Bluenose, I'm thinking of either the Bluejacket Atlantic or, more like likely the Chas. Notman. All this is building up to my question for you. If I can get through these builds in some kind of reasonable time frame, I would like to follow you with the Eagle as a first scratch build. I'm hoping you might be able to give an idea of how I can start now with some research, plans, and preparations. Thank you in advance for any help/direction you might be able to give me.

 

Best regards,

Steve

Edited by Perls

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Hi Steve,

 

Thank You for your interest in "Eagle" 1847. With respect to research for my Topsail Schooner "Eagle" 1847 scratch build I used the following sources:

 

>>> Model Shipways 3/16" scale plans by William Zakambell

>>> Over 36 shipmodel plans of mid 1800's merchant sail collected from Model Shipways, A.J. Fisher, Bluejacket, Harrold Underhill, and various maritime museums

>>> A number of reference books including Crother's, Steel's, Underhill, and many books on rigging

>>> A large scale model of the sister ship "Arrowsic" at the Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, Maine

 

The rest is sort of common sense. I try to consider how I would build the vessel full scale as well as a sense of proportation. When you get ready to start, I would be glad to forward my files and sketches.

 

Regards,

Pete

Edited by Pete Jaquith

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Thanks Pete,

 

I appreciate the references and your kind offer.

 

I will start looking up the reference materials. I also just picked up a copy of Chapelle's "The American Fishing Schnooners 1825-1935 ". It is truly amazing. I never realized the enormous volume of scholarship available and amount of research that model shipbuilders undertake if one is to take a serious approach to the craft (after what I've been learning I'm a bit hesitant to label it a hobby). I'm beginning to understand that while modeling skills are vital, it can be an avocation with an almost an unlimited depth of various skills and learning to which one can apply oneself.

 

I'm still in the shallow end of the pool but, I've set my sights high. I'm sure I will need your help and support along the way. Thanks again.

 

Best,

Stephen

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Pete, your log has really helped me as I try to envision a schooner that I’m trying to build without plans. My dad started it about 1940 and I grew up with it. He’s passed on, and the model was in pretty poor shape, but I wanted to finish it for my grandkids. Thanks for your help on the project!

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Thank you for your interest and support.  Over the past few years I kept busy supporting a number of full scale ship building projects in both the US and Canada.  While continuing my shipbuilding consulting business, Linda and I recently completed a move to Indio, CA.  With my shop setup nearing completion, I plan to return to woodworking and ship modeling in the coming months.  Currently planned projects include:

  • Steam Tug "Seguin" 1:48 scale built in Bath, ME in 1884 (Bluejacket kit)
  • Restart of my Brigantine "Newsboy" 1:64 scale built in 1854 (semi-scratch from Model Shipways kit)
  • Restart of my Brig "Fair American" 1:48 scale circa 1780 (semi-scratch from Model Shipways kit)
  • Restoration of family antique tables

Regards,

Pete, Shipbuilder

 

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