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tkay11

Colouring mono-filament line for seizing line on blocks

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I have been learning how to seize the line on the blocks I've made, and have found that the 0.25mm thread I'm using still seems a bit too large. I've also noticed that many of you use mono-filament fishing line which I see goes down to 0.05mm or so.

 

However, it seems that the monofilament line comes either in transparent, yellow or black, and I haven't seen any in other shades.

 

Is it possible to colour such line, and, if so, how?

 

Thanks, as always, for any experience and advice!

Tony

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OK, I've found more colours available after changing the way I was searching, but I'd still like to know about the possibility of colouring transparent monofilament.

 

Thanks everyone!

Tony

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I'm curious Tony, why would you want to use monofilament line?  Seems to me to be very difficult to knot securely, and thread is much easier to handle and tie??

Tom

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Thanks for the interest, Tom.

 

It's simply because the thinnest thread I can find is Denier 100 and 0.25mm thick. This is the same thickness as the thread I use to strop the blocks. So when I come to seize the blocks, using the same diameter thread looks silly and out of scale. I have noticed, as I said, people using monofilament and fishing line for various types of rigging, so I thought I'd aske the questions. 0.12mm diameter line would be the equivalent of 1" circumference rope at the 1:64 scale I am working at, so that seems a reasonable width to aim at.

 

As to tying it, I had been thinking it would be a combination of knot and CA glue, but maybe my idea is simply mistaken. I've also thought of three-stranded braided fishing line.

 

If you know of thread finer than the Cordonnet 100 I found, then of course it would be great to know about. Basically I'm all ears when it comes to advice about this as I've not done anything like this before.

 

Tony

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Tony

I'm not familiar with either of the two threads (Denier 100 and Cordonnet 100)....but my guess is they are braided or twisted of several independent strands.

When I need a really thin line, I simply separate the independent threads (usually only three or less).  Sounds like a lot of work, but only separate a length slightly longer than you think you need.  Worth a shot IF they are indeed as I describe.

Good luck

Tom

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That's a great idea, Tom. Thanks very much. The kind of thing that's obvious but requires thought -- which I didn't have!

 

Tony

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Tom, thanks.  I have been using monofilament line for the same reason as Tony for seizing small lines.  Separating the strands of the thread is a great idea.  So obvious, yet I never thought in that direction.

 

Henry

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You may want to look also into threads for tying fly-fishing flies. It comes in may sizes and colours, which perhaps does away with the need to colour the threads. The threads are made up from several strands and could also be plucked apart to provide material for seizings.

 

wefalck

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