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DocBlake

Armed Virginia Sloop by DocBlake - FINISHED - 1/48 Scale - Model Shipways

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I don't have drawings of the skylight, but it was not tough to build.  I started with a 1" X 1-1/2" piece of basswood (or whatever) that was 1/8" thick.  This was the "frame" I built the skylight around.  I added walnut planking to the sides, and made walnut gables for each end.  You now have a house with no roof.  Sand the sides and gables flat so the 2 roof panels can be glued to them.  Paint the upper face of the wood block flat black. Then build the actual skylight panels.  I used 1/16" basswood rectangles, sized to your frame.  Carefully cut out areas on each panel where the "glass" will be.  You now have a pair of window panes with 2 panes of glass each.  I lined the inside and outside  edges of these panes with 1/16" X 1/16" walnut.  The glass itself is just acetate glued to the inside of the window panes.  The trickiest part was building the protecting rod apparatus the guards the windows against accidental breakage.  I fashioned the 6 walnut strips that support the rods.  I then ganged then together using double sided tape so I could drill 3 hole through each that would line up perfectly.  I used my Dremel drill press (a wise investment if you don't own one, and not expensive).  Music wire, which is stiff, was blackened and used as the metal bars.  I found it at my local Ace Hardware store, but you could use pins or needles, or even brass rod painted black.  The bottom of the skylight was sanded to a curve to mach the curve of the poop deck and glued in place.  Hope this helps.  Contact me if you have any questions.

 

Dave

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Looks great. Allot of attention to detail in it.   question  the sail rings on the masts.  are they the typical brass ones in AL kits then painted or did you craft them?

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Looks great. Allot of attention to detail in it.   question  the sail rings on the masts.  are they the typical brass ones in AL kits then painted or did you craft them?

 

The AVS kit includes cast white metal rings, or at least that is what is supplied in mine.

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Hi

 

I just finished building my Sloop a couple of weeks ago. Just a sugestion,you might want to remove the bowsprit until you have finished rigging the mast and all thats behind it.

 

I found that it was realy nice to not have to look out when I was moving the ship around to do all of the rest of the rigging. I had seen others in our building group pull their har out when they were rigging their Niagara's with its bowsprit.

 

I afstened all that I could to the bowsprit before I finialy set it in place. I did not glue it or even pin it in place. It fit snug in the metal strap and hole in the bow.

 

I realy had an easyer time with being able to run the lines and rope coils under the mast and around the deck before installing the bowsprit.

 

I did run a temperary forestay line from the topmast to the hole in the bow for the bowsprit,to keep a tension on the mast while doing all of the backstays and shrouds. After completing all of the rigging aft of the mainmast is when I put the bowsprit in place and finished up the rest of the rigging.

 

Keith 

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My modeling empire is rapidly consuming a larger and larger share of our home.  In order to placate the Admiral, I named the AVS after her.  I also added a nameplate that includes her Virginia home port.  Her name is Elizabeth, but that wouldn't fit on the transom along with Norfolk!

 

Dave

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Great work on your AVS Dave. It looks fantastic. Ha! I also named mine after my wife - Sharon J. It certainly made my time in the workshop more acceptable to her.

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Nice AVS! welcome to the club  :cheers:

BTW regarding mast hoops, Bluejacket sells a variety of laser cut hoops made of wood.

 

Ken

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I have made mast hoops by taking wood shavings and wrapping them around a brass rod the right diameter. using glue between

each layer until I reached the desired thickness. Next I sand it smooth using my lathe. You can use a dremel as well. After sanding I cut each hoop off the rod, since white glue does not adhere to brass I was able to remove each hoop off the rod.

To make things easier I would leave the rod in my lathe and use a sharp knife so the cut is even. I learned this method from a club member. Your AVS is looking great. What kind of finish are you using?

David B

Edited by dgbot

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I'm rigging the back stay pendants. They end with a block and are rigged to tackle with blocks fastened to the rail and belayed on a cleat on the bulwark. When there is no tension on the rig, everything looks fine. Once I pull the rigging taut, the tan line of the tackle twists on itself. The first photo shows the twisting, the second shows how things should look. What I think is happening is that pulling the heavier black line of the pendant is causing the line to unwind. The line wants to return to it's twisted state so it pulls the lighter tan tackle rigging and twists it as it returns to the twisted state. Is there any way to fix this? I suspect I'll have to give the pendants a soak of diluted white glue to "fix" the twist in place, and prevent pulling the tan tackle rigging line. Any ideas? Sorry about the poor quality photos

Dave
 

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If your line has that kind of memory soak it is some fabric softener for awhile.

David B

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Almost finished.   Only the anchors left to rig.  I was concerned that my rope coils at the bow were too long, but if I made them shorter, I couldn't get them to bend and lay naturally.  They "stuck out" almost straight from the rail.  I added a shot of a 5'6" sailor standing nearby.  i don't think the scale is terrible.  Any thoughts? I think the riding bit rope coils look OK.

 

I read about a technique using shrink wrap tubing on models for straps, bands etc.  I tried it on my anchors and it worked great.  Just cut to the right width, slide the resulting rings onto  the anchor stock in their proper positions and head in a 300 degree oven for about 3 minutes,  The tubing comes in various sizes and is cheap.  Another great use would be the iron reinforcement rings on the mast.  

 

I'll post finished shots when the anchors are rigged.

 

Dave

 

BTW:  Anyone have a good technique for getting rid of the "fuzzies", especially on the tan rigging?  Dilute white glue?

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Edited by DocBlake

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The coils look good to me Doc.  Nicely done all around.

 

As far as the fuzzies, I've read that running the flame from a lighter over them quickly can burn them off nicely without showing, but I think I'd try that off the ship first!

 

Coating them with dilute white glue or beeswax or something once the fuzzies are gone might help prevent their return over time, I'd personally try the white glue before beeswax, as I can't help but think that waxed lines would be a great dust attractor.

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Nicely done Dave.  I need to get off my butt and back to work on mine.

 

On your fuzzies - what rope was it that you were getting the fuzzies from (I can see it in your close-ups)?  The terrible rope in the kit is some sort of nylon, so I can't see how that would fuzz up.  Did you have some extra you used from another source?

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Hi Brian, and thanks.  The line is Amati line.  The junk in the AVS kit is worthless.  I used Syren line for my battle station, and ultimately that's what I'll use going forward.  Expensive, but looks great.  Unless I buy a Byrnes rope walk.......

 

Dave

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DocBlake,

 

Fantastic model it gives me the inspiration to get off my duff and build the one I have in the shipyard.

I have some rope that I bought from Chuck that I will use on mine. I love the lines and the rich color of your build. Thank you for sharing.

 

Happy modeling,

 

Marty G.

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Hi Brian, and thanks.  The line is Amati line.  The junk in the AVS kit is worthless.  I used Syren line for my battle station, and ultimately that's what I'll use going forward.  Expensive, but looks great.  Unless I buy a Byrnes rope walk.......

 

Dave

 

I agree about the MS kit line.  I've got Syren line already for my AVS, and will probably stick with it rather than dealing with trying to make my own in the future.

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