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silverfoxes

Purpose of three ropes on the side of the 1/96 Revell Connie's hull. - moved by moderator

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A question for the more nautically educated of our members.    Many of us are familiar with the 1/96 scale plastic Revell USS Constitution kit.   I myself am in the process of building it for the third time in my life.

 

During all of those builds, I've never thought to question any of the instructions until now.   I guess you could say that it's a rigging question and quite familiar to those who have built this model.

 

On page 5, step 6 of the instructions for the old H-398 kit, the modeler is instructed to cut six 24" lengths of the large diameter tan thread. They are then told to thread three of these lines per side through the hull and tie them off underneath.  My question is - just what purpose did/do these three sections of rope serve on the actual ship?    Help stabilize the hull in some manner?  

 

I wonder if these rope lines have always been on the ship, or if they might just be a result of a more recent restoration/rebuild (1927?).   While doing research in the 1950's for their USS Constitution model, Revell may have then automatically incorporated these ropes into their kit.  I am building my Connie to be as close to her July 19, 1812 configuration as i can possibly ascertain, and I wonder if she actually had these ropes during that time frame.   Does the Hull model show these ropes going around the ship's hull?  Would appreciate any input from the rigging experts on the forum.

Edited by silverfoxes

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Those are for the sheet and tack lines for the lower sails. They have you tie them off inside early on because the belaying point (where they tie off) is not accessible aft the upper deck goes on. They are tied around the hull to keep them out of the way until you begin rigging.

 

Russ

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Those are for the sheet and tack lines for the lower sails. They have you tie them off inside early on because the belaying point (where they tie off) is not accessible aft the upper deck goes on. They are tied around the hull to keep them out of the way until you begin rigging.

 

Russ

Russ:

 

Well I'll be keel hauled! In my previous Connie builds I never went on to properly rig her - obviously!    If I had, I would've known to untie those threads from beneath the hull and use them to rig the sails.  I was much younger and a good deal more impatient back then.  I will now scrutinize the rigging instructions very closely.  Many thanks!

Edited by silverfoxes

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Popeye2sea (Henry) says the lines are not currently on the restored Constitution. Russ is absolutely correct - they are the lower yard sheet and tack lines. I am getting ready to coil some line around my cleats (I changed the 'nibs' for cleats) tomorrow.

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There are many, many lines not currently rigged on Constitution, since she never sets most of her sails.  The ship currently only has the 3 top sails, a fore topmast stay sail, and a spanker.  She also does not have any yard, mast, or stay tackles.  It's pretty much just the standing rigging.

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These buggars have been in the way throughout the entire build only to be some of the last lines to be set.  And now most ofter not used?

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