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Endeavour J Class Yacht by LMDAVE - FINISHED - Amati - 1:80

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Nice work Dave, I did not realize the size till I saw the dime, what is the overall length ?  She's looking Great

 

Best Regards,

Pete

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I would catch up with you if I could just solve the cracks in the hull problem. I have been away for the weekend. I am going to try some of the suggestions in my log this week.

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Well...one answer could be, that's a reason for double planking, even if you're not going to varrnish the hull. It would have stiffened it up more. But, I believe the instruction even say you can skip the double plank if painting.

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You are right. I think the key learning here is that particularly for this size edge gluing is essential. I did edge glue but obviously not enough.

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I've been jumping around since starting the deck, I actually assembled the mast, which was a pain, I wish would have given a full length dowel...but I'll show that later.

 

I installed the low profile handrails. These are all brass. I wish I could find some good close up pics of the actual Endeavour, curious what these looked like on the actually yacht. Also I  was amazed that this was the extent of hand rails, you pretty much had to be sitting down or laying holding on to these to stay on deck when she was in rough water. Just seems like this boat would have lost a lot of crew members, but I don't know much of her history.

 

409820866.jpg

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Pete - Thanks for these Pics. They help me with some of my decisions. The first picture reminds me of when I was racing. The Captain would yell "Meat to the rail!" and everyone would hang out as far as they could. One time when we had an accidental Jibe I went from being high side to my foulies being up to my thighs in icy cold saltwater.

 

Dave - On a race boat you don't want railing in the true sense. You do want something that you can tie off to if needed. On long races we would rig a line running from Bow to stern and winch it tight. If you were on deck with most of the crew asleep you would clip your safety harness to this line if you needed to go forward to the bow.

 

In AC racing there is a story of a bowman going over board and basically pulling himself back on the boat with the Jib sheet. The attitude in racing is that true railing would just slow the boat down, both because of added weight and wind resistance. On a cruising sailboat we called what you call railing Life lines. We also told any newcomers on the boat that if your life depended on it then forget it. they were not strong enough to hold the average person's weight. You were always aware of what were the strong and weak parts of the boat. I could hold on the forestay or the shrouds. If they were strong enough to hold the mast then they could hold me. Some station and life line bolted to the deck. Would keep sail bags from washing over board but not you.

 

Remember the rule - One had for the boat and one hand for you.

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Thanks for the pics, Pete, that helps. Seems my plans had the rails placed much further inward than the actual, but I'll live with that.

 

Good stories Floyd, sounds like quite an adreniline ride!

 

Love this picture , the captain looks so laid back like this is nothing.

 

621-sopwith-helms-endeavour.jpg

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Thanks Force, just read about him on Wiki.

 

I was just thinking about my rails, the original boat looked to have brass eyes, but wooden rails going through them. I should able to get those 4 brass rods out pretty easy, and may replace them with small wooden dowels. That would look more accurate and better. Look for updates....

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OK, I abandoned the idea wooden handrail, I couldn't find a dowel that small.

 

I moved forward with more deck items. I decided to start stropping some of the wood blocks with thin brass wire, and I attached them in the appropriate area around the mast opening. This allowed me to go ahead and install the mast that I've been working on side. The mast was assemble six separate half moon dowel and a left over piece of hull planking in the middle to create the opening slot. The mast was so flimsy still and any sanding and tapering of the mast would crack the glue where the connection points were along the length. I wish one long piece was made. And a whole bunch of eyes where installed along the mast and cross trees. It was all painted gloss white.

 

409828447.jpg

 

409828449.jpg

 

409828446.jpg

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Good work. The mast looks good enough to my eye. I reckon you will have to careful in rigging to make sure you do not put too much pressure on it.

 

Russ

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Nice work Dave , the Mast looks great , and you have all the blocks installed , She's moving right along . Nice work

 

Best Regards,

Pete

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Thanks Russ/Pete

 

Yes, I'll have to be careful during the rigging to not install too many on one side before evening out on the other. And, there many more blocks to install.

 

One thing this kit has, that someone else brought up in their kit, is the sails. They are cloth, but they have pre printed brown dash line on them. Now if it was just where to cut and hem them, I'd be OK, but the also have pre-printed lines where all the reef lines along the sails are. NOw I saw someone install these plain, and it looked bad. But I dont think I can sew over them. I guess all someone can do is get their own sails and not use these. The only use of the pre-printed stuff is the letters of the boat.

 

409831251.jpg

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Well, having just plans and cloth is normal, like Bluenose was. I just put transfer ink onto the cloth from the plans and sewed along the lines and washed the ink out. These brown dashed are permenant as far as I know. I'll play around with one and see if I can sew over the lines. But, otherwise I'll jsut buy some new cloth and make my own. Or just present the ship with sails stowed.

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IMHO this beauty cries for sails up. You can always rig her with the sails out as if you were on a down wind run that way you can see the deck and still be impressed with the sails. Besides take the challenge and rig a .5 ounce chute! make it colorful. that will get everyone's attention. :)

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IMHO this beauty cries for sails up. You can always rig her with the sails out as if you were on a down wind run that way you can see the deck and still be impressed with the sails. Besides take the challenge and rig a .5 ounce chute! make it colorful. that will get everyone attention. :)

It would get my attention

 

Best Regards,

Pete

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Hey Dave, I have replied to Richard's 1:35 build and glad I found more folks building the 1:80 kit.  I too was confused as to the boom and mast coming first in the instructions, but I did go ahead and build them.  Not too well as I look back.  I need some tapering skills and trying to attach the hinge on the boom was a pain in my nails. :)

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Hi Jd, thanks for stopping by. Yeah, I don't have the best tpaering skills, but one thing I do if I have a strong mast is clamp it in a drill, and get some 150 grit sanding paper and wrap it around the mast the I can go up and down the the taper going a little futher down each time but always goign back to the top, that way the top gets the most sanded and it is gradual on the way down. But some mast are taper just in the back and the front is even with the rest of the mast. I just down the same procedurebut without it spinning and ust file 3/4 of the way around from tip to where the taper starts.

 

Yeah, the hinge at the bottom, I didn't do it the way the instructions were. Actually I made the piece out of scratch and didnt realize until later that they provide the parts. BUt, I revert back to the kit piece and made it work.

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Were you able to get the hinge mounted on both sides of the triangular taper and then attach the cleats?  I had a hard time with those.  I guess the instructions will let me know later what the other hole I drilled through the mast end of the boom was for?  LOL

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Thanks Pete!

 

JD, I bent the hinge to be at the same angle as the taper, and glued the hinge in place, from there I drilled the holes for the nails and put them in.

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I have a question on your first two planks on page 1.  Where are the joints located?  It appears that the plank goes from the bow to just short of the stern, but the planks are not that long, right?

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Floyd, my boom piece started of triangular, but just bigger than it needed to be.  I sanded one end more than the other till I got close to the measurement listed and then tapered it from end to end.  I am not sure I like the shape anyway, but that was what the directions showed.  

 

And as for the hinge, it wanted to buckle as I attempted to fit it around it's pin.

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