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LMDAVE

Endeavour J Class Yacht by LMDAVE - FINISHED - Amati 1:80

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Thanks ragove, it's not normally very clean on my desk.

 

Floyd, I know most that do this kit jsut use the one roll of tan for everything. I don't want to be that laid back on it. I have a thicker gauge for the larger stays, and will just used the supplied tan for the running rigging goign through the blocks.

 

This is a good picture for showing a lot of the rigging.

 

http://homepage.eircom.net/~johnhearne/Sailing/Grenada/Endeavour%205.jpg'>http://homepage.eircom.net/~johnhearne/Sailing/Grenada/Endeavour%205.jpg

Edited by LMDAVE

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Dave - the problem with this picture is that it is recent. are you building her as she currently sits, or as she was during the America's Cup? Also it is hard to see enough detail to see if the shrouds are metal or rope. I think it is interesting to see the rest of the running rigging. I also agree about using several diameters of line. I believe my kit has both black and tan. But 1 size of each.

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Here's a good shot to see some original rigging. One thing this picture shows is the gauges on the block is attach to the hatch behind the ship wheel, not the one in front, like most model show. I cant tell if the one in front of him has it, but it's clear that the guages and behind Sopwith. I'm leaving mine where it is.

 

121754.jpg

Edited by LMDAVE

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That is a real good shot at the running rigging. If I look very close to the standing rigging at the side of the mast I think I see a turnbuckle. If so this would confirm that the standing rigging was wire rope or steel cable. This was common for this period. I also like the blocks on each side to control the bend of the mast. similar to what we do today on the backstay when preparing for a race.

 

A good title for this shot would be - "Gentlemen Meat to the Rail!"

Edited by Floyd Kershner

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Well, you'll never guess...

 

The Admiral decided to pick up a bit since I am working in my office on the deck-houses and she threw them in the trash.  But, she was good enough to go through and find them for me.  I think I'll keep her.

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What did you use to make up the blocks so they can attach to the eye bolts in the deck?  It shows to use the tan thread, but it looks like you used some type of brass wire?

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Yeah, had a lot of experience with Bluenose on making the blocks with thin brass wire. I ran out but only have a few more blocks to go, so will probably use thread on those.

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HI LMDAVE, looking good,

quick question, are you going to paint your winch black?

it says so in the instructions but it does seem a bit weird?

 

Also why does it suggest painting the cleats brown?

I'm no expert but wouldn;t these be brass/metal of some form?

 

also nice work on the ships wheel, like your extra brown coat,

better that than the rather odd, silver colour is comes in!

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The cleats are painted brown because I suppose the original ones were large wooden cleats. I can't find good old pics. They are cast metal because precutting these probably would not have worked well. It was a  pain to paint them.

Edited by LMDAVE

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Hi LMDAVE

How are the sails coming along? When I built my Endeavour I ended up removing the sails in the end, didn't think they looked nice. But on the Britannia I'm building now I'll definitely have sails. The cloth delivered with that kit was thinner and smoother than that delivered with the Endeavour, plus they aren't printed, something I think you commented that you didn't like. Do you have any other hints when it comes to sails? Did you soak them in wallpaper glue to make them a bit stiff?

Erik

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Erik, you can see on page 8 of my build how the sails came out, I was forced to use dark brown and just sewed over the daark brown dashes. I would have preferred just an offwhite slightly darker than the sails. I didn't presoak in glue, if that doesn't make them look unnatural I guess that's a way to help form them, otherwise jsut let them have their natural hang from being cloth.

 

I'm at the point that I might install the main sail. If it bothers me, I may start over with different sails.

 

I guess once you get a good material, you can transfer lines onto the sail with transfer paper and sew reef lines over those lines, because the transfer lines wash out. Then you just let them air dry while stretching them over your plans with push pins so they don't shrink, and then iron.

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I just found that I am short of the 1 x 1 darker wood strips that are used at the bow near the cleats and then along the 2nd plank around most of the deck.  shown in figure 63 and 68.  I am not sure where I can get some to replace the missing pieces.

 

Jeff

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YOu can either order pieces online or find a local hobby shop that carry balsa wood strips.

 

OK, decided to move forward and lace in the main sail. Probably a good idea to do it now since the more rigging to work around the harder it is. I didn't do all the loops up the mast and down the boom, just enough to hold it in place for now. The "hypotenuse" of the sail must have been a little longer than it should have because it doesnt pull tight and causes the sail to lay an inch or two to the side, Not a problem when seen from the side. My main problem with the main sail was the lower reef lines, those came out the worst before I started using my sewing machine better, but I kept it. I'll just 'pretend' the sail is old because of use.

 

409978787.jpg

 

409978786.jpg

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Thanks! Yeah, take one line at a time, try not to let slack happen in the lines unless it intentionally has slack in it. Sometimes pulling something tight will cause another to have slack, so think that through. Usually doing it in the order they show is good.

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LMDAVE

I'm up to point /figure 66. On the instructions

And it says a block (7) will be applied to these eye bolts

And then magically shows the blocks attached to the provided rope.

 

I'm guessing the kit does not include any brass wire to make the little block hoops?

What did you use?

It's seems weird this is not included in the kit as everything else is!?

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I used the tan thread that came with the kit, and stropping the blocks turned out better than I thought it would.  They are a bit longer than is shown in the instruction book, but I think they will work.

post-14625-0-31634900-1409870247_thumb.jpg

post-14625-0-95982700-1409870254_thumb.jpg

Edited by jdbradford

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Dave - I hope you will not be offended by the question - but have you sailed on a real boat?

 

I can just see my sailing instructor turning in his grave the Hypot of what!!!

 

Let me humbly offer a quick lesson which has been drilled so permanently into my brain.

 

Triangular sails have 6 parts - 3 corners and 3 edges. The names of the corners are Head (can you guess which one this is?) Tack (the tack never moves & Clew. The edges are the Foot, the Luff and the Leach. I think everyone will know the Foot. The Luff is the first edge that will luff. ie the edge that meets the wind first.

 

For the main sail power is derived by having an airfoil shape. so yes the Leach will not be straight and the sail will not be a flat triangle.

 

Careful tuning of the air foil is what wins races. Which is why this boat has so much tackle on the boom. This boat has an aluminum boom. This was a huge advancement in technology for the time. Also the boom was allowed to flex which also helped with the air foil shape in certain conditions.

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Floyd, not offended at all...yes, my love for sailing is more of a visual thing that I hope to someday learn. I love learning term, so that was a good lesson. I've learn a lot during the bluenose build, and more here.

 

Henry James, I realized I didn't answer your question before, but the brass wire I used was around .020" or 0.019" brass wire. I know the kit suggests rope, but I liked the brass.

 

This kit is almost finished. I'll even say my next update of pictures will be the final showing. I already attached the 3 sails. I'm dressing of the rigging of that, and will finish any final rigging. The end of this build came faster than I was expecting!

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OK, I decided to to the finishing touches on this today, and posted the final pics here:

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/gallery/album/901-endeavour-j-class-yacht-1934-801-amati/

 

Thanks for everyone following this thread and build. LIke I said before, the end came faster than I expected. Now for a little break and think of the next possible build.

Edited by LMDAVE

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Congratulations Dave on finishing another build.  I love the details on deck and the overall shape of the ship.  Looking forward to the next one!

 

Bob

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Hi LMDAVE,

 

apologies for being a bit annoying, but I think you've missed a few bits (unless you meant to!)

firstly at the bow of the boat there is a couple of pieces of 1mm x 1mm wood strip right at the front of the boat edge

(See Figure 63 in instructions)

 

also if you check Table 2 of the deck plan and look to the starboard bow side, you will see a long 'pole' this is

also show on the same page in its own diagram box and is called 'Tangone' (Part No. 105) it some form of tapered 2mm x 150mm pole that is mounted on deck,

you'll see they are mounted in the remaining little brass supports from the kit.

 

No idea what it is? or what it represents but thought I'd worth mentioning

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Ok let me offer some more input from a racing sailor. The "long pole" is the spinnaker pole. The spinnaker is the huge light weight sail that is attached to the head of the mast and used only to go fast down wind. Depending on your point of sail (angle on the wind) you fly the spinnaker with or without the jib. The spinnaker is also called the chute or spin for short. Often the last leg of a race is downwind and so you will often find the chute flying for the finish.

 

The member of the crew known as "mast" (often this was me). Is often found laying flat on his back staring intently as the top of the mast (head) and watching for the slightest indication that the chute is collapsing. It is his responsibility to control the spin sheet and pull in or out to keep the sail flying. This guy has no idea where the boat is and where it is going. He concentrates on just one thing. Fly the Chute!

 

The spinnaker pole is attached at one end to the mast and the other end to a clew of the spinnaker ( a spinnaker has 2 clews and no tack, i.e. there is no corner of the sail that is permanently attached to the boat.)

 

PS you have never lived unless you have had the Spinnaker "sky the pole". I.e. some idiot did not keep the downhaul taught. This idiot (yes me) got lifted off the deck and for a few seconds Hanging over the water off the port bow. :P

 

PPS if you are crewing on a race boat you should remember to let go when something bad starts to happen. :huh:

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Very nice yacht you have building Lmdave!

 

PS you have never lived unless you have had the Spinnaker "sky the pole". I.e. some idiot did not keep the downhaul taught. This idiot (yes me) got lifted off the deck and for a few seconds Hanging over the water off the port bow. :P

 

PPS if you are crewing on a race boat you should remember to let go when something bad starts to happen. :huh:

 

I've done that!  Good times.  After things calmed down, I was given that PPS advice by the skipper too!

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