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Brig Fair American circa 1780 by Pete Jaquith - Model Shipways - 1:48 scale


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Welcome to the Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 build log,

 

With the bulwarks, transom, and black strake complete, next steps included:

 

>>> Deck scuppers fabricated from 5/64" thin wall brass tube

>>> Deck scuppers drilled from both ends

>>> Wales fitted after completion of deck scuppers

>>> Bulwark cap rail fabricated from sheet stock

>>> Bulwark interiors painted prior to cap rail installation

 

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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Pete - I love those scuppers. You may be able to answer a question for me. On many kits they have a plank that follows the inside of the bulwarks. it is often called the waterway. But it is thicker than the deck planking. to me this makes not sense. the water will not reach the scuppers if they are above deck heights. Unless there is lots of water. So is there really a water way plank? and is it really larger than the deck planking?

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Floyd, Robert,

 

Thank you for your interest and a very good question re waterways. The following points apply:

 

Period Wooden Shipbuilding Practice

>>> The outer deck edge or waterway was a logical place to add strength members; i.e. the larger the vessel the more and larger strength members

>>> The current Clipper Ship "Young America" build log shows this even on the lower decks

>>> While some of the added thickness would be let into the frames, shipbuilders tend to add most thickness changes away from the molded line (top of deck frames and outside of shell frames)

>>> As a result, most deck scuppers were located in the waterway planking or in the deck planking IB with a bend just below the deck framing (see "Newsboy" picture attached)

>>> Some coastal schooners left out the lower bulwark plank or part there of (see "Eagle" picture attached)

 

Modern Steel Shipbuilding Practice

>>> The outer deck plate (deck stringer) and upper shell plate (shear strake) are often thicker high strength notch tough steel (up to 2/1/2" on modern container ships)

>>> As an exception to the general rule, this is sometimes let into the internal framing (i.e. flush on top)

>>> Deck scuppers are pipe with a 120 degree bend below the deck framing passing out through the shell plating

>>> Modern ships typically have no camber, and if used camber is straight line

>>> Modern ships typically have no shear, and if used shear is straight line

>>> These changes are a result of mechanized flat panel line construction

>>> Deck drainage is considered early in the design, but remember ships are constantly in motion at sea and therefore through off most deck water when at sea, in port they are moored with a slight list to keep the decks clear

 

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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Welcome to the Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 build log,

 

Continuing with the fancy rails and poop deck framing, key points include:

 

>>> Heights of wales, black strake, bulwark planking, main rail, fancy rail, and poop deck planking are all related

>>> Fancy rails pre painted to minimize masking

>>> Fairing of poop deck framing required

>>> Fancy rail caps left loose (install after poop deck planking)

 

With the fancy rails complete, the stern is starting to take shape. Next steps will include the poop bulkhead and poop deck planking.

 

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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Welcome to the Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 build log,

 

Continuing with the poop bulkhead, key points include:

 

>>> Poop bulkhead moved aft to clear cannon rigging

>>> Poop bulkhead redesigned based on contemporary practice

>>> Poop bulkhead designed as P/S removable panels with fixed CL panel (e.g. P/S panels removed when at battle station); see design sketch

>>> CL bulkhead panel includes support for steering shaft

>>> Poop bulkhead painted prior to installation

 

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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Welcome to the Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 build log,

 

Next step was poop deck planking. Key points include:

 

>>> Poop deck planked using curved/tapered planks

>>> Deck planking laid out using design sketch

>>> Deck planking cut from sheet stock using ships curves

>>> Deck planking finished as per main deck planking (Ipswich Pine oil stain and oil based gell wiping varnish)

>>> Fancy rail cap installed after completion of poop deck planking

 

This completes deck, bulwark, hull, and transom construction above the main wales. The transom and upper hull framing on these vessels is rather complex but makes an interesting model when complete. My choice of curved planking on both the main and poop decks added a little challenge but I feel it was worth while. This model is but a small tribute to the craftsmen who built these vessels in the late 1700's.

 

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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Floyd,

 

Ships curves are different curves more suitable for ships lines. A full set of 156 curves would be hard to find, but a selection of 6-8 common curves should be available on the internet. I have been using the same set of 8 curves for >50 years but I don't have the numbers with me.

 

Good luck,

Pete

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Robert,

 

Thank you four interest in "Fair American" circa 1780.  The curved planks were realy not difficult, just developing a sketch based on ship conditions.  I used proportional dividers and ships curves to layout the planking.

 

Regards,

Pete

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Hi Pete -

Nicely done!!!  I am beginning to think that I should delay any more work on my Fair American build...and wait to see how you do it.  So far you have made some excellent modifications to the "kit".  Please keep the progress reports and photos coming.

 

<<Gary>>

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Gary,

 

Thank you for your interest in the Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 build log.  Is noted earlier, I try to model my ships as they might have looked.  In doing so, I feel free to modify details and resize components as my research dictates.

 

My Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 is currently in storage while I persue my latest 1:1 scale shipbuilding project at Vancouver Shipyards in North Vancouver, BC Canada (17 ships to 6 different designs).  I have a few "Fair American" pictures left addressing planning of hull planking, lining off, and installation of the 1st few strakes of hull planking.

 

A few of the changes under consideration include:

  1. Single hull planking following period practice
  2. Replacement cannons/gun charriages (per mock up)
  3. Resize deck furniture (as required)
  4. Possible addition of ships cutter (from Admirality Models)
  5. Stern lantern kit (from Caldercraft Models)

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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Welcome to the Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 Build Log,

 

With the deck, bulwarks, and transom complete, work shifted to the lower hull planking.  Key Points include:

 

>>> Table of planking butts updated (see pictures) 

>>> Planking layout includes 4 planking belts, 1st broard and garboard strakes (18 plank strakes)

>>> One stealer added to lower planking belt

>>> Planking belts laid and faired using 3/32" sq. batterns

>>> Planking 1/16" basswood

>>> Midship plank width ~7/32" (10" full size) 

>>> Maximum plank width at stern post ~5/16" (15" full size)

>>> Curved planks cut from sheet stock using ships curves

 

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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Welcome to the Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 build log,

 

Continuing with the lower hull planking, key points include:

 

>>> 1st broad and garboard strakes fitted (see previous pictures)

>>> 3 strakes fitted below wales aft port

>>> Aft curved planks were cut from sheet stock

>>> Aft planks required heavy soaking where bending up to counter

 

Since completing the above construction, I have been engaged in Vancouver Shipbuilding's start up of their newly updated shipyard in North Vancouver, BC Canada.  I am working as the Mgr. Production Engineering with responsibility for shipbuilding plans, hull block and outfit module arrangements, design for production guidance, and assembly planning for 17 ships (6 different designs) under Canada's Non-Combat Federal Fleet Renewal Program.

 

My "Fair American" circa 1780 model is currently in storage awaiting my return to the model shipyard.

 

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

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  • 2 weeks later...

Welcome to the Brig "Fair American" circa 1780 build log,

 

Continuing with the lower hull planking, key points include:

 

>>> 1st broad and garboard strakes fitted (see previous pictures)

>>> 3 strakes fitted below wales aft port

>>> Aft curved planks were cut from sheet stock

>>> Aft planks required heavy soaking where bending up to counter

 

Since completing the above construction, I have been engaged in Vancouver Shipbuilding's start up of their newly updated shipyard in North Vancouver, BC Canada.  I am working as the Mgr. Production Engineering with responsibility for shipbuilding plans, hull block and outfit module arrangements, design for production guidance, and assembly planning for 17 ships (6 different designs) under Canada's Non-Combat Federal Fleet Renewal Program.

 

My "Fair American" circa 1780 model is currently in storage awaiting my return to the model shipyard.

 

Pete Jaquith

Shipbuilder

Beautiful build,

I used a technique learned as a kid working in a body shop; to fair the hull planking I sprayed a shadow coat ( very light coat) of flat black on the rough sanded planking, then made up various sized sanding blocks, different roughness, the low spots stay blackened making it easier to fair to smooth.

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