Jump to content
Beef Wellington

HMS Jason by Beef Wellington - Caldercraft - 1:64 - Artois-class frigate modified from HMS Diana 1794

Recommended Posts

Thanks everyone as always for continued interest....

 

Jim - not going to be able to put canon rigging off much longer....ugghh

 

The area around and immediately aft of the pumps is really quite congested and requires some planning.  The main jeer and topsail sheet bitts were scratched, parts from the kit look a little oversize to my eye.  Pillars were made square in section after studying as many pictures as I could find, these seem to be a mix between square and round, but I don't think my turning skills are up to making round ones.  Side blocks and fake sheaves were also added. 

 

For the aftermost stanchions, I followed the AOTS diagrams which shows these to be of smaller dimension.  All of these items will require some final finishing.  The capstan step was cut out of a single piece of 2mm boxwood and 'joints' faked by scoring with a knife and filling with pencil lead.  This took a while with just hand tools and I couldn't help but think of a toilet seat from the end result!  These details will be visible but obscured so forcing myself not to be too fussy.  The base of the capstan itself as sanded back to the pawl rim which sits in the hole in the capstan step.  (This requires a lot more finishing to get the surface to be acceptable)

 

Pictures are hopefully self explanatory.  I've shaped some box for the elm tree pump shafts and I've placed an offcut just to get a sense for positioning....

 

And to mystery that's been puzzling me for a while (and Rob alludes to in his Ethalion log), how does the placement of the pump brakes reconcile in the this workspace in such close proximity to the capstan and companion? 

  • I seem to recall reading 'somewhere' that some stanchions were removeable which would explain the location around the capstan  - once both sets were removed this would make this workable.  In later ships, these seem to have been replaced by hinged iron columns which makes a lot of sense.  if anyone could corroborate that would be much appreciated!
  • Lastly, given the pump brakes also extend to this area, these would really be a permanent accident waiting to happen at the foot of the ladder to the quarterdeck which must have received quite a bit of use.  I can't find any reference to this, bit I have to suspect that pump brakes were removeable, and unshipped when not in use.  On the Artios class, there is a set forward, and 2 sets aft - in normal seagoing routine I would speculate that not all banks would have been needed, but could easily have been placed in the event or expectation of an emergency.  The last photo below from Victory seems to show exactly this, and it also makes the square section joining each brake much more functional.  Again, if anyone can point me to sources would be much appreciated!
  •  

IMG_2121.thumb.JPG.3afbbc42d49bee468631bad565799560.JPGIMG_2115.thumb.JPG.3815664448674a7c94a9872c7335d200.JPGIMG_2116.thumb.JPG.1e057b38adb577fc67a553dc009f407b.JPGIMG_2114.thumb.JPG.0ad3d0bcf3907097d3e27ca2738debcb.JPGIMG_2118.thumb.JPG.44a6678090f03bc0afaca451f21edf65.JPGIMG_2115.thumb.JPG.3815664448674a7c94a9872c7335d200.JPGIMG_2113.thumb.JPG.c699872cd55b0b880fceb3c691a70d8d.JPGHMS-Victory-pump-assembly-lower-gun-deck.thumb.jpg.1a00fc45f7547882fa37fe8bb5cddf4f.jpg

 

 

Edited by Beef Wellington

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pat - the capstan is the 3D printed one I had previously ordered.  I had ordered the 'best quality' I could from Shapeways as well as a few other things, but in my opinion the quality of finish won't fly for items that are openly visible.  However, I can live with these for items that are mostly obscured (stove and lower capstan).  I'll be scratching my own quarterdeck capstan.

 

Paul - thanks for confirming.

Edited by Beef Wellington

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jason, the capstan turned out great.  A mate drew up the one I needed in a #D programme and we have also just had it printed at shapeways.  I think we used ultra high definition plastic.  I am just assembling my Vampire printed with the same  stuff and it gave nice detail - just a cow to clean.  What did you use?

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Pat - I tried using a very fine sanding stick after coat of primer had been sprayed on.  This worked in some cases, but less so in others, and not at all in all those hard to reach corners.  I've never seen many samples of 3D printing to compare to so I may be being a little unfair, and of course it comes down to the materials supplied.  I ordered the "Smoothest Fine Detail' option which was the 'best' finish of those available.  Its odd as one side is almost perfect, the other much rougher...https://www.shapeways.com/product/9VPR7D8CW/1-64-lower-capstan-18th-and-19th-century?optionId=64749325.  I suspect other materials offered by other suppliers could give better results.

 

Taking stock:

 

Not too much time in the shipyard this weekend, trying to get the garden ready for winter.  The shipyard did however get a bit of a spring cleaning as I was getting a little bit tired of working in a 2"x2" square on my cutting mat despite working on a pretty large table.  A few overall shots of where things stand as its been a while.  Now the channels are glued, the chainplate locations could be drilled as well as the emergency rigging eyebolt positions.  The scuppers have also been completed.  The positioning of all of these things requires quite a bit of planning and luckily I didn't encounter any problems with the airing ports.  (I seem to recall leaving off the foremost one because it is very tightly positioned between preventer links and would have been impossible to locate correctly and likely resulted in a necessary compromise with the chain alignments. 

 

Nearly all the parts for the upper gun deck have been completed an I'm still following the mantra of not gluing something into place until it absolutely needs to progress.

 

IMG_2124.thumb.JPG.97fea89b344891ca5899c42f5b767074.JPGIMG_2125.thumb.JPG.c2576419dfe813d20d4610ad3de8e63e.JPGIMG_2126.thumb.JPG.3b92c95fd6dd92dd1ac8f72ddab4c835.JPG

 

Syren rope will be used, and I would welcome peoples' opinions on which size to use for the breech rope.  Picked two sizes that seemed most appropriate, left is 0.025"/0.63mm, the right is 0.35"/0.88mm.  Even though I'm sure it exists, I can't find info on what regulation would be - and even if I did, the carriages and barrels are best efforts at matching scale and undoubtedly not spot on, so the right "look" is probably more important.  Upon consideration, I think I'm leaning toward the smaller size, but again would appreciate input...

 

IMG_2122.thumb.JPG.c9d27618b4c2fdaa7607561acb1e7b02.JPGIMG_2123.thumb.JPG.25162b7aa24f11baf7a3e6449e2a6eb9.JPG

 

Edited by Beef Wellington

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jason - in my humble opinion I would lean toward the heavier rope,but it`s your ship so do what looks good to you!  I am no expert,but most of the pictures I`ve seen of real guns seem to use really heavy rope for the breech. A fantastic build you have going there!

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carl  - sadly Victory doesn't have any 18lb'ers...

 

Found the exact info I needed after a lot of digging in the 'armament' section:  This translates as follows:

  • 24lb 6 1/2" circumference - 0.82mm diameter at 1:64
  • 18lb 5 1/2" circumference - 0.69mm diameter at 1:64
  • 9lb 4 1/2 circumference - 0.57mm at 1:64

 

So not surprisingly, the smaller size is slightly too small (91% of actual), and the larger too large (127% of actual).  Mathematics would point the smaller size being least inaccurate, so as always it seems it comes down to the 'eye of the beholder'.  Interestingly, I had initially leaned toward the larger size as well, but changed my view.

 

Cannons on Trincomalee are 18lb'ers, but the breech rope do look bulkier, however no info to suggest that these are indeed the 'period correct' size either.  And so the modelers dilemma, follow sources, try to replicate (possibly inaccurate) real life examples, and/or follow your eye!  (The cheesed hauling tackles jump out at me as a little incongruous being probably not contemporary practice (rather than more practical frapping) but this is a look modelers follow because it does look good!)

 

The jury is still out...of course, this isn't a matter of life and death, its way more important than that 🙂 

 

15722633935_abd7708270_b.thumb.jpg.d4a0b03884759d6c9a0076d489e79408.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by Beef Wellington

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, in the midst of discussion about rope weights, I think we forgot to say your model looks absolutely stunning. Love seeing photos of the whole thing.

Your finishes are very very clean. And the limited, consistent palette of colours you have chosen to use, is very pleasing to the eye. It gives your model a classical quality.

I really admire your work.

 

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Beef Wellington said:

Carl  - sadly Victory doesn't have any 18lb'ers...

that isn't necessary, it is the way it looks, which in the end will define if it looks correct or not, for would you see the difference with the naked eye between

0.82mm and 0.69mm diameter

or

0.69mm and 0.57mm diameter

(although you will probably see the difference between the extremes) in the end it is you whom decides



Edited by cog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great Jason, one of my favorite logs on this site.

 

How did you do the scuppers?  Does the kit come with rings that you just glue on?  My Caldercraft Badger kit had rings for the scuppers - they drove me a bit nuts because they kept brushing off the hull.  I bought some kind of product that is used in electrical applications that is like a metal tube with a flange on the end (forget what it's called).  So, I'm thinking that using those will have more stability because I can insert them into the hull.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...