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Mike Y

Oliver Cromwell by Mike Y - 1:48, 1777, POF (Hahn style)

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Yay, the fairing is finally finished! It was a nasty process with lots of curves, and final finish done by scraping with xacto blades.

But in the end no frame got hurt, no iron bolts got exposed (though some come really close to the edge).  ^_^

 

Applied one coat of a non-diluted, 100% pure tung oil (tried diluted oil - result was blotchy, meh).

I was applying a very moderate amount of oil and wiping it with a cloth quickly to prevent uneven result. Covering only the outside surface, no oil at all was applied inside the hull (because deck clamps would be glued to it). The process was very relaxing, finished in the middle of the night..

 

And you can imagine my surprise when I checked the inside of the hull and saw OIL there!  :huh:

Seems like it really penetrated through the entire frame, except the thicker floor timbers. You can see the oil avoiding the lamination seems, where glue blocks the oil from penetrating.

I really thought it goes just 1-2mm inside the wood, but no, it is more like 5mm, and maybe even 10mm if you take the grain direction into account.

 

post-5430-0-41297000-1462568766_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-73416900-1462569025_thumb.jpg

 

At the same time, it is fairly simple to scrape it away with xacto blade. Miracle. Capillary suction sucked a pretty thick oil, which was applied in a very moderate amounts.. Who could have guessed. 

Edited by Mike Y

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Final result. As you can see, I was not really careful with the wood selection in the beginning, so there is a spot of lighter pear around the midship. I began to sort the wood into lighter and darker color later on, and now it is visible. Forever. Well.. Let's call it an artistic touch :D

Overall, I am pleased with the colour, but surprised it became reddish. It will probably get darker and fade away over time.

There is also a big contrast between the along-the-grain wood covered with WOP (all the parts of the keel) and cross-grain wood with oil applied. It is literally the same wood, where I selected a pretty dark pieces for the keel! I swear! Now it looks like two different woods. Let's call this a feature too :)  

 

post-5430-0-15490600-1462569070_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-55358500-1462569064_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-36921700-1462569067_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-83179400-1462569068_thumb.jpg

 

I am done with the fairing, and done with the hull structure. HOORRAY!

Now I can finally relax, watch the oil dry and start making the deck clamps. Big relief! The hull is not screwed up while fairing, the viking funeral is cancelled :)

Edited by Mike Y

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Beautiful framing, Mike.  The finish makes it pop.  I wouldn't worry too much about "light" and "dark" differences since as the wood ages, it will change color.  I'm not sure what time frame is involved, however.   ;)   I noticed on my build that the Swiss pear was brownish-pink when I put the planks on and then went more pinkish with the Wipe on Poly.  It's now slowly loosing the pink.  

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As Mark already stated: Don't worry about dark and light. It comes down to the quality of the wood work, and as far as I can see that is high indeed!! MAsterful work, Mike

 

Cheers

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Beautyful framing job. What's about planking the hull over the waterline? I am abit curious that you oiled the complete hull. I've made the experience, that wood glue don't work on oiled timber.

Thank you!

The oiled side would not be planked at all, the other side would be fully planked, so it was not oiled :)

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Hi Mike

 

I can't add any more compliments to those that have already been given, because your work is outstanding!

 

I also love the shape and beauty that your hull has. You've most certainly done it justice.

 

Wel done.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

Edited by Omega1234

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Thanks a lot for likes and good words, it is really encouraging!

Now playing with different tools to properly transfer height/depth from plans to the inside of the hull. Height gauge only works outside, but thanks to MSW, there are lots of different jigs posted in other build logs :)

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Started marking the deck clamp positions, seems pretty straightforward:

post-5430-0-88397400-1463322184_thumb.jpg

 

But I am really confused about the location of the lower deck clamp.

The method is very simple - take the deck beams locations, make an offset because they are inserted into 1'' recesses in the clamps, mark the clamp position accordingly.

 

However, the lower deck beams line has some weird step, according to Hahn plans:

post-5430-0-71567600-1463318829_thumb.jpg

 

Original NNM plans have two sets of beams pictured, one of them is in dotted lines:

post-5430-0-95237300-1463318830_thumb.jpg

 

Close-up: 

post-5430-0-89682200-1463318831_thumb.jpg

 

I am really confused about the meaning of it. With an open and unplanked hull, I do not want to make a stepped lower deck clamp, it will not look nice.

 

Would really appreciate an advice! 

Edited by Mike Y

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Mike,

 

Do you want it to look nice, or do you want to build according to plan ... it seems that is the primary question to ask ... Ships weren't build with an open hull, so these "ugly" or "weird" constructions would not be seen. Furthermore, it looks like the powderroom just shows above the lowered floorplan. The top of which is in line with the other floor, which might be just the reason for the stepped flooring. Unfortunately, I'm no expert, and can't confirm it or any other possible reason to build it thus.

 

Hope someone can give you a definite answer

 

Cheers

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Carl, I agree, but I am a bit confused with the meaning of these dotted lines on the NNM blueprint.

What are they?

If I remember correctly, the powder room has a tiled floor for various reasons, there should be a space for this floor. So the shape of the powder room outlined with dotted lines make more sense.

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Hello Mike,

 

for me it looks like the aft magazine. But what was really build? The description of the floor plans at the NMM says:

 

post-13971-0-56268300-1463329089.jpg

 

So I think, that the dotted lines are those after the reconstruction of the ship in England at your plan.

 

post-13971-0-38515400-1463329212.jpg

 

When I'm right then are the full lines the construction in the hold and the dotted lines these of the orlop deck at this plan.

 

So what would you build, the american or english version? An other question is, because you would build a beautiful model and not a realistic model you should leaf it out. Most admiralty models started the interior with the gun deck, so that you could see through the frames.

 

You have build a really beautiful model, congratulation

 

I hope I could help,

Siggi

Edited by Siggi52

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Robin, you are right, it is a magazine. I am not very familiar with the internal rooms yet... :)

 

Siggi, you helped a lot, thank you! Will build an english version, with a smooth line of the lower deck clamp :)

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The dashed lines generally mean proposed alterations for RN service, and they were usually done, if time permitted. If the alterations had been made before the ship's plan had been been completed, then those lines would have been drawn solid. American, French and privateer internal accommodations were usually not up to Royal Navy standards, especially powder magazines. Siggi's right. If you want to make her the American Privateer with the name "Oliver Cromwell" under her stern windows, she will be a different ship internally, than if you build her as "HMS Beaver's Prize".

 

I don't know about tile magazine flooring, but historian Peter Goodwin reminds us "The doors and bulkheads were often lined with lead, or later with copper, to prevent sparks", in his "Construction and Fitting of the English Man of War". Perhaps the floor was sheathed to. It also prevented water and rat damage. Privateers often didn't have the time, or the extra money, to build such extra niceties.

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Marked all deck clamps locations and now playing with a small simple clamps that will help to glue deck clamps in place (no pun intended).

The inner surface of the clamp is the extra soft basswood from the longboat kit, it is very good for clamping because it will never scratch the surface. 

But it can't hold anything in place, so the back side of the clamps is made of pear. Seems to work!

The screws are nylon to avoid scratching the frames.

 

post-5430-0-58861900-1463773507_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-70149300-1463773506_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-38510500-1463773505_thumb.jpg

 

(this is a temporary strip, not a real clamp. Just to mark a nice curve)

Edited by Mike Y

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Thanks for the comments and likes! :)

 

The idea with soft inner side of the clamps paid off, it flexes in difficult tight corners, no damage to the wood or to the finish:

post-5430-0-20088200-1463921719_thumb.jpg

 

Just need to make more of them, waiting for the shipment of nylon screws.

 

In a meanwhile, used my mill for the mass production of the scarph joints. Took 40min for two batches, including mill setup and a cleanup!

 

Rough cut angle planks are fixed in the mill:

post-5430-0-52500200-1463921712_thumb.jpg

First some passes to make them all level.

Then cutting the ends to the depth of the joint (2mm in my case):

post-5430-0-00194300-1463921714_thumb.jpg

 

Dividing the remaining joint in 2 equal parts, using mill table to measure the distance (do not forget to offset the cutter diameter). Cutting with the same 2mm depth:

post-5430-0-14457500-1463921715_thumb.jpg

 

The resulting joint is perfect, but a bit too tight, needs force to be assembled, no space for glue.

post-5430-0-35277800-1463921716_thumb.jpg

 

Sliiightly trimming ends of the planks on a disk sander, carefully with the angles:

post-5430-0-55577100-1463921717_thumb.jpg

 

And that's it!

post-5430-0-50427700-1463921718_thumb.jpg

 

Without a mill, it would take me half a day to make all these joints with chisel and file, and they would not be so straight..

 

Result of the day:

clamps are steamed and fixed into place, left overnight to dry

post-5430-0-23030400-1463921720_thumb.jpg 

 

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