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Mike Y

Oliver Cromwell by Mike Y - 1:48, 1777, POF (Hahn style)

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Deck clamp installation is in progress.

Some clamps are curved (bow and stern), edge bending will not really work with such thick planks, so cut them to shape.

Tracing paper helps a lot, just make sure it is fixed in place and will not move:

 

post-5430-0-76795700-1464457639_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-44559700-1464457650_thumb.jpg

 

In a meanwhile, was trying to make treenails. I do not trust the glue joint between the deck clamps and the frames, it might be too weak for the humidity varations. So will reinforce it with a boxwood treenails, brass nails would be really hard to sand inside the hull.

Drawing through drawplate is really difficult after 0.7mm diameter, and is also very time consuming.

Tried another method - drilling with a hypodermic needle, sharpened as a crown.

So far my experiments failed - after first few nails wood gets stuck inside the nail and you get burned holes.

After careful reading, seems like the trick is to bend the edges of the needle to the inside, so there would be a gap between the inner surface of a needle and a treenail.

Tried the same idea with a large needle (designed to inflate balls) - but it is not polished inside, so I get burned wood again.

Also, dremel drilling stand vibrates too much, so mill is the only option for that method.

 

post-5430-0-35614300-1464457660_thumb.jpg

 

Test results, fail:

post-5430-0-28048100-1464457662_thumb.jpg

 

Ordered a bigger hypodermic needles, will try again.

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Hi Mike,

 

Would bamboo be easier to draw than boxwood? Instead of brass nails maybe you could use copper. I would think that you could file the nails down if you used a #0 or #2 flat riffler without damaging the hull. http://www.ottofrei....nd-LR12711.html. Anyway, just a thought

 

Mike

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Hi Mike,

 

Would bamboo be easier to draw than boxwood? Instead of brass nails maybe you could use copper. I would think that you could file the nails down if you used a #0 or #2 flat riffler without damaging the hull. http://www.ottofrei....nd-LR12711.html. Anyway, just a

 

Thanks for the advice!

I experimented with brass wire, copper wire and a boxwood treenail on the pear plank with tung oil on top.

Copper looks a bit not how I want it, brass looks better, but both are very difficult to sand/file if it is a concave surface inside the hull. Also, I am not confident in the glue bond between the nail and wood if using CA, and do not have an experience with CA.

So boxwood is the safest way to go. Bamboo is too grainy when exposed cross-grain.

 

Yes, I was reading that topic and followed advices from it. Hope that method will work with a larger needle, waiting for it to arrive. Edited by Mike Y

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Unless the wood grain of the boxwood is absolutely straight, it will not draw without breaking in smaller sizes. Use split bamboo, as Mike suggests.

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Unless the wood grain of the boxwood is absolutely straight, it will not draw without breaking in smaller sizes. Use split bamboo, as Mike suggests.

Yes, the grain is not perfectly straight in the pieces I tried. Bamboo seems a bit too grainy when used as a treenail.. Will try it again though, thanks for the advice!

 

Current status: need more clamps to install the deck clamps! :)

post-5430-0-99612900-1464533139_thumb.jpg

 

I fitted joints to be a bit loose, so they are clearly visible from the outside:

post-5430-0-40471500-1464533141_thumb.jpg

 

The only problem is a not perfectly smooth run of the clamps around midship. I made them out of 100% straight planks, instead should have curved them just a little bit. Well, next time, on the next model :)

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Maybe I have some wrong bamboo... It looks very uneven.

Did a test. Swiss pear, tung oil as finish.

Two photos done with different lightning.

 

Top plank, left: brass

Top plank, middle: castello boxwood

Top plank, right: copper

Bottom plank: bamboo

 

post-5430-0-24890100-1465327630_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-42230900-1465327631_thumb.jpg

 

 

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The lighting certainly changed things considerably!

 

Might be just my bad eye sight but the bamboo doesn't seem quite right does it.

 

The top middle castello looks nice.

Edited by AON

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I use normally veneer for treenails, if I need a diameter smaller 0.7mm. For pear I uss pear treenails.

 

I cut small square strips. Then I  draw them 3-4 times through the draw plate. They are not perfectly round, but I can hammering them in the whole. After this the are round.

Edited by AnobiumPunctatum

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Been busy with apartment renovations - painting, painting, painting, and replacing all floors with a nice oak hardwood :)

Finally back to modelling!

 

Treenailing the deck clamp, with a plastic pattern to mark holes accurately:

post-5430-0-00043300-1469647484_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-38517700-1469647485_thumb.jpg

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Hi Mike

 

Whoever said/thought that the framework of a hull isn't beautiful, obviously hasn't seen your work.  Talk about precise, symmetrical and down right, just plain gorgeous...oh, and the workmanship's not too bad, either ;)  ;)  ;) .  

 

Nice stuff!

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

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Thanks for all the warm words, it is very encouraging!

Ugh, I am ashamed to admit, but this is just a pencil marked locations for the nails. Not the real nails. :) 
 

The treenailing itself is in progress and mostly done, but no photos yet. Realised that hand drill is not the way to go - takes 15-20sec to drill each hole, and fingertips are hurting after a hundred of holes. Building process should be a pleasure, so need to change the process to make it enjoyable :)

Not enough space to use the rotary tool, even the mini dremel. Ordered a tiny chuck and a small motor, should be enough to make a micro drill.

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Drilling with a pin chuck is very time consuming - been there, done that! I hope you can mini-mechanize the process. Look forward to seeing your home-made drill for small spaces.

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hi mike

looking very good.

i tend to use precut boxwood for my treenails.......available from most good veneer suppliers in 1 metre lengths.

the grain tends to be nice and straight and ive managed to pull 0.4mm diameter treenails with the byrnes drawplate.

it does break but usually end up with lengths that are more than usable.

 

in england they are available in various dimensions .....the smallest i ve found are 0.5mm sqaure.

 

original marquetry  and timberline are two good companys.

 

looking forward to more progress.

 

cheers....mick

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Quite unexpectedly ended up in Hamburg maritime museum. Unfortunately I only had 45min to visit it, and the museum is big - 9 floors of maritime history! It was also full of great models, including Oliver Cromwell! I was really surprised to see it in the museum, considering a very boring history behind that ship. 

The model is good, seems to be done in a fully framed manner, but 95% planked. There is a small opening in the bottom of the hull, which is barely visible. 

Sorry for the poor photo quality, museum has a soft light which makes it cozy, but hard to make photos (especially on a phone)

 

post-5430-0-71043500-1471778060_thumb.jpg

 

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Decor:

post-5430-0-19914200-1471778059_thumb.jpg

post-5430-0-69078500-1471778068_thumb.jpg

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My modelling progress is quite slow,  barely find few hours per week to work on it.

Still installing various deck clamps:

post-5430-0-07259000-1471784557_thumb.jpg

 

Using scrapers to make the final shaping of the clamps when they are already installed. Straight or curved, depending on a section:

post-5430-0-42147700-1471784553_thumb.jpg

 

post-5430-0-04633600-1471784555_thumb.jpg

 

And a final polish with a straight xacto blade, it barely removes any material, but leaves a nice finish, better than sandpaper for such tight locations:

post-5430-0-93398200-1471784555_thumb.jpg

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