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michael mott

Bristol Pilot Cutter by michael mott - 1/8 scale (POF)

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good morning Druxey,

 

Have you thought of using acrylic matt medium for the purpose?

No I have not, My thinking was along the lines of the sewing glues that are used to hold seams together before sewing. The stuff I used on the full size sails smelled like copydex basically a latex liquid rubber type glue. I wanted to first see how the eyelets would work. Now I know. next is looking at different ways of accomplishing the tabling and panel seams. the sails will be sewn as well.

 

Thanks for all the support regarding the show, and for the likes.

 

Off to help with putting in the docks today.

 

Michael

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Hi Bob and Lawrence, Thanks for your thoughts and concern. With so many different avenues of interest I sometimes feel a little divided, Almost like a lack of focus.  I can focus intensely for a period on one project, then get sidetracked and follow its course before remembering something on the original project, and so go back to it and the cycles repeat, and so it goes. If only there were 48 hours in each day....

Then there is house maintenance, and visiting, the afternoon nap... you understand.

 

Michael 

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Thanks Michael

 

I was worrying about getting the fold neat (sheet metal work wasn't my best apprenticeship experience) so I came up with a slightly different plan which I will try when I am next home - Friday. If it does not work I will try your method. 

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Well thanks to everyone who have pressed the like button on this rather slow build.

I took a break from all the other stuff today and did a bit more reworking of the cabin I am still working out the shape and size of the companionway into the hull.

 

The underside of the forward section of the cut up cabin was a bit weak and so I added a thin reinforcing strip to keep things together until the rear cross timber is added

 

Capture2135.JPG.8ee4c80b056858683a6e55a3f5e526d3.JPG

 

I shortened the rails and the hatch and also cut the rear section of the old cabin top in half along the line of the front of the new structure (temporary blocked up to see if this shape and size feel right)

 

 

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So I will sit with this for a couple of days and then if it still feels about right I will finish up the structure and it will be fixed permanently with the rear section to the deck. Access to the interior will still be adequate through the two forward sections in order to load and unload the ballast weights.

 

Michael

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One can't appreciate the detail and expert craftsmanship in builds such as this unless they take a walk through the process, or have walked that path themselves.  Every time I see your work, Michael, I think I am in a boat yard watching the master shipwright ply his craft.  Beautiful work, Michael!

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Thank you all for your support and encouragement.

Since it seems that winter does not want to let go in these parts I might be able to spend a bit more time working on the cutter alongside the restoration work which I should technically working on diligently in the day time hours.

But it is evening.

I am also beginning to get back to the compass and am working on the glass viewing and access port. the first task is to cut the foundation ring for the oval support that the lid will hinge off.

 

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The copper dome was inverted onto a scrap of  .031" (.8mm) brass sheet by inverting the dome and scribing a line to mark the inside diameter of the ring.

Next will be to fret out the hole and then use the hole as a guide with an odd-leg divider or caliper to scribe the outside of the line parallel to the inside hole.

 

Michael

CaptureDSCN0017.JPG

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After my afternoon nap a little more progress.

first I set up the plate to drill a hole for the fretting out of the central portion.

 

DSCN0026x1024.jpg.67f33410a3299dce18ec5d76a1db172a.jpg

And while looking for a couple of wrenches to tighten the collet I came across my very first tool that i made in school metalwork class an adjustable spanner, a great project that included all the major hand tool operations from cutting with a hacksaw to filing, bevels and holes, also draw filing  and lathe work for the adjusting nut, tapping and threading, riveting and also case hardening by heating up the main body to almost white heat in the forge and then plunging it into a tub of carbon powder. All before I reached the tender young age of 14.

 

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The next picture shows the bow compass ready to mark the line for the next cut with the jewelers saw.

 

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And cut out ready to file to finish size.

 

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Temporarily balanced over the hole for a test to see how it will look.

 

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I found the picture of the cast Iron from the BBQ grill that I will use to turn up the iron balls, the bar is machined from one of the grill to eventually to be fitted as a firebox grill in a steam locomotive.

 

IMG_6354x1024.jpg.1d42b78e5937be6ef1f925498a58e1ae.jpg

 

Michael

 

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Michael. Re first tools.

 

I remember those days well. All nuts came with acres of space around them and no obstructions in sight. Perfect for accommodating the pride and joy of our schoolboy and apprentice exploits. My first product was a pipe wrench, hack sawn, hand filed, drilled, turned, reamed, riveted, case hardened and lovingly polished. Alas it is no more, its teeth gradually fell off and it was consigned to that great scrap yard in the sky. I bet these days kids make them on 3D printers and wonder what all the fuss is about.

 

 

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1 minute ago, KeithAug said:

All nuts came with acres of space around them and no obstructions in sight.

Ah yes engines that you could actually fix without needing to completely disassemble the whole front end to get to a nut that adjusts the alternator. LOL

 

Michael 

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Thanks Julie, and thanks for all those who pressed the like button.

 

I used an old Watchmaking tool as a go no-go gauge to file the ring down to a constant width.

 

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Then set up the copper dome in the third hand in order to solder the brass ring to it.

 

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temporarily reassembled

 

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time for bed

 

Michael

 

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