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Bristol Pilot Cutter by michael mott - 1/8 scale (POF)

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1 hour ago, michael mott said:

Walter has been watching what was going on over on the Skipjack ways and asked if he could borrow a lamp.

I couldn't resist.

Today I glued the floor into the bottom of the cockpit.

Michael

Michael.

Great job done! Lantern is a work of art!

 

But the sailor in the cockpit is nothing like you. :) 

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IMG_5979x1024.jpg

 

I've seen a lot of coal oil (kerosene, paraffin) running lamps in my days, but I've never seen one like that one. I've seen port and starboard lights in electric fixtures, mounted on the bow of small powerboats with a septim between the two to avoid confusion, but never an oil lamp like that. Perhaps it's a European model.  The angle of the lenses is interesting. It would seem they'd not be as easy to see from dead ahead (and wouldn't meet modern regulations.)  Can you tell us where you found the prototype and a bit about it. I'll bet there's an interesting story to it. 

 

Beautiful workmanship, by the way!

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20 hours ago, michael mott said:

The prototype is here in my Skipjack build log.

Thanks for the reference, Michael! I must confess to overlooking the Skipjack build log. I noted some prior references to "the skipjack," but erroneously presumed it was a reference to a Chesapeake Bay skipjack and not a launch. Turn of the last century launches are a particular interest of mine, especially steamers. (I once restored a now-100 year old model of steam yacht, including its working steam plant, and modeling a steam launch with a working steam plant has been on my "bucket list" ever since.) I've scheduled a couple of hours to pore over that log, too. (Thank you for your generous sharing of so many tricks, tips, and techniques! I've learned so much from your posts.)

 

I answered my own question as soon as I realized it was a bow light that would have probably been used under one of the old "inland rules" powered vessel light systems instead of a running light on a sailing skipjack. The "headlight and sidelights" combination evolved, IIRC, into today's sidelights and 360 degree white masthead "steaming" light navigation lights regulation.

 

The prototype is a product of the Persky Lantern Company or its descendant companies.  The company was started by Frederick Perksy, who later changed his name to Perkins. Eventually, Perkins' company became the Perko Company, still family-owned and in operation over a hundred years later and one of the giants of the marine hardware industry. https://www.perko.com/about_us/ I was unable to locate an old Persky/Perkins/Perko catalog on line, but I expect the prototype of your lamp would be found there if an ancient Perko catalog could be found. (Mystic Seaport may have one in its library.)  Here's a couple of articles on the history of the Perko Company, one with some nice photos of their older lamps, many of which were in production for nearly a century. https://www.perko.com/about_us/  http://skipjacksnauticalliving.blogspot.com/2012/12/

 

Now, to the regret of some of us, Perko's lights are all electric fixtures and their once huge selection of oil lamps are no longer manufactured. (Sadder still, many early examples have been "electrified" by well-intentioned, but nonetheless barbarian, interior decorators to make "nautical décor" lamp stands and the like!

 

The "Christmas tree" shaped ventilating holes in the chimneys of all Persky/Perkins/Perko oil lamps has always been their company trademark.  The below photo of a sister prototype to your miniature depicts this trademark feature well.  I will also point out the blue lens on the below prototype.   It is a detail that, if models are any indication, is frequently overlooked... or ignored in the interests of "artistic license."  The lens on starboard oil burning running lights is always blue. (Or, where the lens is clear glass, there will be a blue colored piece of glass behind it inside the lamp.) When the oil lamp is lit, the flame of the lamp is yellow. The yellow flame projecting light through the blue lens yields a green light. Similarly, the port lens will be a very dark red, so as to yield a red, rather than an orange, light when lit. This is apparent in the below photo. (This isn't any criticism of your magnificent miniature lamp, Michael, but if you decided to replace the green lens with a indigo blue one and the red one with a darker red one, ...  but, never mind, lest I push you completely over the edge.) :D 

 

 

12206_brass_port_starboard_running_light

Edited by Bob Cleek

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1 hour ago, Bob Cleek said:

When the oil lamp is lit, the flame of the lamp is yellow. The yellow flame projecting light through the blue lens yields a green light. Similarly, the port lens will be a very dark red, so as to yield a red, rather than an orange, light when lit. This is apparent in the below photo. (This isn't any criticism of your magnificent miniature lamp, Michael, but if you decided to replace the green lens with a indigo blue one and the red one with a darker red one, ...  but, never mind, lest I push you completely over the edge.) :D 

Thank you for the information Bob that does make a great deal of sense... Yeah I don't want to go over the edge just yet. The sample you showed is lovely.

 

Michael

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10 hours ago, Bob Cleek said:

Thanks for the reference, Michael! I must confess to overlooking the Skipjack build log. I noted some prior references to "the skipjack," but erroneously presumed it was a reference to a Chesapeake Bay skipjack and not a launch. Turn of the last century launches are a particular interest of mine, especially steamers. (I once restored a now-100 year old model of steam yacht, including its working steam plant, and modeling a steam launch with a working steam plant has been on my "bucket list" ever since.) I've scheduled a couple of hours to pore over that log, too. (Thank you for your generous sharing of so many tricks, tips, and techniques! I've learned so much from your posts.)

 

I answered my own question as soon as I realized it was a bow light that would have probably been used under one of the old "inland rules" powered vessel light systems instead of a running light on a sailing skipjack. The "headlight and sidelights" combination evolved, IIRC, into today's sidelights and 360 degree white masthead "steaming" light navigation lights regulation.

 

The prototype is a product of the Persky Lantern Company or its descendant companies.  The company was started by Frederick Perksy, who later changed his name to Perkins. Eventually, Perkins' company became the Perko Company, still family-owned and in operation over a hundred years later and one of the giants of the marine hardware industry. https://www.perko.com/about_us/ I was unable to locate an old Persky/Perkins/Perko catalog on line, but I expect the prototype of your lamp would be found there if an ancient Perko catalog could be found. (Mystic Seaport may have one in its library.)  Here's a couple of articles on the history of the Perko Company, one with some nice photos of their older lamps, many of which were in production for nearly a century. https://www.perko.com/about_us/  http://skipjacksnauticalliving.blogspot.com/2012/12/

 

Now, to the regret of some of us, Perko's lights are all electric fixtures and their once huge selection of oil lamps are no longer manufactured. (Sadder still, many early examples have been "electrified" by well-intentioned, but nonetheless barbarian, interior decorators to make "nautical décor" lamp stands and the like!

 

The "Christmas tree" shaped ventilating holes in the chimneys of all Persky/Perkins/Perko oil lamps has always been their company trademark.  The below photo of a sister prototype to your miniature depicts this trademark feature well.  I will also point out the blue lens on the below prototype.   It is a detail that, if models are any indication, is frequently overlooked... or ignored in the interests of "artistic license."  The lens on starboard oil burning running lights is always blue. (Or, where the lens is clear glass, there will be a blue colored piece of glass behind it inside the lamp.) When the oil lamp is lit, the flame of the lamp is yellow. The yellow flame projecting light through the blue lens yields a green light. Similarly, the port lens will be a very dark red, so as to yield a red, rather than an orange, light when lit. This is apparent in the below photo. (This isn't any criticism of your magnificent miniature lamp, Michael, but if you decided to replace the green lens with a indigo blue one and the red one with a darker red one, ...  but, never mind, lest I push you completely over the edge.) :D 

 

 

12206_brass_port_starboard_running_light

Very true indeed Bob.  My father owned several old railroad lanterns that used blue lenses such as you depict and he explained it to me as the very reason you just explained.  The light omitted was green.  Yellow flame + blues lens= green light.   Smart folks back in the day.....

 

Rob

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On 8/17/2019 at 4:52 PM, Mauricio Pinto said:

Would like to have some help in finding plans for a pilot cutter model. Anyone there able to help a beginner?

At the risk of thread drift, may I recommend Tom Cunliffe's Pilot Cutters Under Sailhttps://www.amazon.com/Pilot-Cutters-Under-Sail-Pilotage/dp/1848321546

 

Also of interest would be Luke Powell's Working Sail. I haven't read it, but it appears to be full of pilot cutter "porn." He's made quite a name for himself building pilot cutter replica yachts of late. You can also go to WoodenBoat Magazine's website and use their index to order back issues with articles detailing his designs and work. https://classic-sailing.co.uk/article/luke-powells-book-pilot-cutters-working-sail

 

The pilot boat Bible is the two volume set, Pilot, volume one is on pilot schooners and volume two is on pilot boats with other rigs, as I recall. A bit pricey at around seventy bucks a copy, but highly regarded. https://www.woodenboatstore.com/collections/history-books/products/pilots These are also by Tom Cunliffe and are presumably expansions of his original Pilot Cutters Under Sail published earlier.

 

Malcolm Darch has a great modeling book in its own right, Modelling Maritime History. It covers the builds of models of various historic vessels, one of which is Marguerite, a Bristol Channel pilot cutter. Each chapter offers lines, rigging plans, contemporary photographs, and discussions of building techniques for each model he discusses. What I liked about this book is that the models he builds aren't the "usual suspects," but rather a wide spectrum of subject matter. I'd expect an experienced scratch builder could build a model of any of the subjects in his book, although its not exactly a "how to build it" book, but more of a "how I built it" book. https://www.amazon.com/Modelling-Maritime-History-Malcolm-Darch/dp/0715391380

 

Then, of course, you've got a beautiful one right here in this thread to whet your appetite!

Edited by Bob Cleek

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A happy new year to everyone. Today I started to do a bit more work on the cockpit The supporting side panels were covered with some "panels" of  mahogany. So now I can finish the top boards and hing the lids. then the cushions to complete the main elements of the cockpit.

 

The support sheet is pine

IMG_5676x1024.thumb.jpg.a3efca24049cc013dd1d6628687208f4.jpg

 

then the Mahogany was glued to the panels and treated with Tung Oil

 

IMG_8506x1024.jpg.f8d3570c6d00c33e63e5b4a8d6704407.jpg

The edges of the teak seating will now get finished and fitted with the lids hinged to access the lockers underneath.

IMG_8510x1024.jpg.754259145a7073c00fd578862f2427e6.jpg

It feels good to get a little work done on the cutter, so thanks Dubz for the inspiration. 

Michael

 

 

Edited by michael mott
spelling

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Great to see this stunning model back gracing our screens Michael.  happy New year and the best of everything to you and yours for 2020.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Steve , John, Druxey, Pat, Thanks for your kind words and thanks to those who added the likes. I am really enjoying getting back to the cutter. This evening I had a go at a miniature piano hinge.

First I annealed a couple of strips of .003" brass shim-stock, then folded it over a piece of .025" music wire in the grinding vice.

IMG_8515x1024.jpg.0ddf9386130ede876b6842c5fdfffa41.jpg

Next I trimmed it to width with an exacto knife.

IMG_8517x1024.jpg.fb8c96a75fb8d1243a6c8d4e2bde783a.jpg

Put it back into the vice tucking it down as far as it would go in order to file away the the alternate tabs I basically eyeballed the distance as the width of the needle file.

IMG_8518x1024.jpg.2c4ae496105c85d6f2efb2a47b397c3b.jpg

Folded the second strip and repeated the filing using the first one as a guide to get the spacing matched this was a little tedious with a lot of trial and error

IMG_8519x1024.jpg.b40f1bd4a42032843db63f52237524f1.jpg

 

The two halves fit together nicely eventually.

IMG_8522x1024.jpg.c4adbbd1bf418107c77c1942b8211fd7.jpg

Then they were fitted to the boards this is before the holes were countersunk and the copper rivets slotted to make them look like copper screws, I was so focused on getting this finished that I forgot to take any pictures of the countersinks and slotted screws, I will make sure I do that on the second one.

IMG_8530x1024.jpg.dac8fadd30e2a9c152531a3441ce7bfa.jpg

Here the lid is fitted to the starboard side locker.

   IMG_8531x1024.jpg.8c381bf23a6026515c53b94189366a15.jpg

 

IMG_8533x1024.jpg.3c2c78880153e85d2bd737b9ba0545b5.jpg

Once they were fitted with the "screws" I ran some CA glue along the joint between the brass and the wood on both sides of the hinge just to lock the pins in place. The hinge feels pretty solid and folds nicely so I am pleased with today's progress.

 

Michael

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So happy that you are back, Michael.

I just looked to the detail picture of your tiller and compared with the tiller that I made for my anatomy project. What a difference!
I'm ready to learn.

Happy New Year!

Edited by G.L.

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Hi Michael,

from time to time I keep looking at your construction report. I am also glad that you are bacck.
Here is a wonderful model emerging.
At this point I would like to thank you for showing us how you do the detailed work. I learned a lot from that and am looking forward to continuing in the new year.
I wish you and your family all the best for 2020.

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Eberhard, Keith, Dirk, GL, Johann, and Mark. Thank you all for you feedback. I am happy that the work I am doing has helped, and given ideas to you all, the feeling is completely mutual I assure you. I have learned so much by participating in this fantastic forum there is so much knowledge held by the membership here that it would fill volumes of books (which it does) my own library is very modest at this point but it grows slowly. and this forum is a world class library in itself.

So finally thank you to the administrators and owners of this site for your great work that allows us to share this hobby safely, and a happy and prosperous New Year to you all.

 

Michael 

Edited by michael mott
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