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michael mott

Bristol Pilot Cutter by michael mott - 1/8 scale (POF)

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2 hours ago, FriedClams said:

but aren't the screw slots supposed to be horizontal? 

Well Gary not according to some learned members of this site. From a logical perspective though having the moisture, dust , able to fall out via gravity makes much sense to me.

 

2 hours ago, cog said:

I was under the impression you knew all about brass, now it seems you have some (memory) gaps in your knowledge!!

There are some  "known knowns; there are things we know we know" about brass. "We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know" about brass.

Sorry Carl I couldn't resist.

 

Michael

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2 hours ago, michael mott said:

Well Gary not according to some learned members of this site.

I have a dry quirky sense of humor Michael - I was just ribbing you about the screw slot orientation discussion. 
 

Gary

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Royal plural, Michael (I couldn't resist it either ;) ) But thanks to let me know about the known knowns and unknowns, it makes even me knowledgeable.

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I picked up my new slotting saw and arbor yesterday I like the way it cuts. I also prefer using the lathe for making the slots rather than the mill The worm on the quill is a bit worn and the very fine depth adjustment is still able to be done but is much more fiddly that on the lathe when making multiple increments for slots on the lathe I just need to index the carriage along the bed. All the same issues really but easier to deal with on my lathe. Ah the joys of backlash on old machines (50 years)

 

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Nice clean cuts these are .057" which is the thickest width on the 2 inch diameter saw with 110 teeth

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Michael

 

 

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Spent a few hours this morning mucking about with turning tool form, working at making minute screws from hard brass which turns  better than the small brass plated pins that have heads that are forged and require some very careful cleaning up in order to create the fake screws. I eventually came up with the formula for the smallest screws they have a .5mm body with a 1mm head.

 

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This afternoon assembled the top half of the port side paneling after finishing the forward cabinet door hinges, I glued on the rear vertical supports and boxed out the interiors of the two cabinets. I am still deciding haw to deal with the middle panel. yesterday I picked up some very nice tan material for the cushions.

 

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The insides of the cabinets are recycled extremely fine grained old growth clear fir that came from the redwood garage door The frames around the redwood panes was old growth clear fir.

I put a coat of Tung oil on the maple it has a nice glow.

 

Michael

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I quite like solid brass pins as raw material, because the forging/stamping process hardens the material and makes it easier to turn. However, if you have access to hard brass rods, that is probably the easier option, requiring few machining steps.

 

What shall I say, I can only join into the chorus of praise ...

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Thank you All for your kind comments, and also to those who are following along quietly.

I spent the morning sorting out the forward and aft bulkheads for the dining area had to scratch my head a few times. This afternoon was spent prepping the materials for them. I have decided that the forward bulkhead will be made to include the sides of the seating areas, and will have a location tab at the edges to locate the forward ends of the side panels, the aft bulk head will form as parts of the cooking area and as there is no door they are smaller and will also have a location tab for the aft end of the side panels.

A couple of shot showing today's progress

 

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Michael

 

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Beautiful joinery Michael, a master carpenter couldn't do better.  

 

Those screws look great; any chance of seeing the 'formula' or process you settled on?

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Michael, have you considered making up a scale bill of sale or papers showing the shipwright, you, and the completion date that you can stick in a cupboard or something in the interior that may be found in years to come. I met a modeller at ANMM years ago that had the pleasure of being part of a miniature camera probe deep into the bowels of some of the original admiralty models at a maritime museum in England and they found interesting things.

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Pat Thanks, I will draw up the sequence that I used, it might take a day or so.

Steve funny you should mention that, The very first model that I made when I came to Canada was a silver  plated model of a Sherman Tank that was used in the second world war that helped to liberate Holland I made it for the Sarcee Barack's Silver collection. it was a 1/72 scale model and the track actually worked there were 1571 parts that were made to complete this model. I folded a piece of paper with my name age address and that I made it, and placed it inside the model before it was delivered. 

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I had forgotten about this until you mentioned the idea so yes I will do that perhaps in the charts locker.

 

Michael

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After watching your construction of the door hinges, Michael, I was holding my breath waiting to see whether you'd be able to fabricate operating latches to scale or have to "fake" them. Your Sherman tank answered that question!

 

Brass handle combination for small warded lock
 
Brass handle combination for small warded lock
 
Blank key for delicate yacht lock
 
Cupboard rim lock
 
 
For those who are unaware of it, Toplicht is a chandlery firm in Hamburg, Germany, which carries what is probably the most extensive collection of ship and yacht products anywhere in the world. They are in many instances the only source of many traditional yacht and ship fittings left. Their nearly 500 page free catalog is full of photos and engineering drawings for all sorts of bits and pieces of "jewelry" and I'd nominate it for a "must have" in any scratch builder's reference library.  https://www.toplicht.de/en/catalog
 
 
 
 

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Well now that we agree we all had hair we can move on. first for Pat the sequence for making the screw like pins

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then mounted in the pin vice to cut the slot.

 

I spent the afternoon fitting the rails and stiles to the plan I used the shooting board a lot to trim pieces to length.

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Then prepared some more salted maple for the bulkhead panels, some trimming still need to be done to bring the panels to the correct widths.

 

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This is the material I picked up for the cushions.

 

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And this is the way they will look with the buttons , these are cotton seat cushions from one of the garden railway carriages.

 

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That's all for today.

 

Michael

 

 

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Thanks very much Michael, stow that away as well.  

 

I had to look twice at the cabin paneling with the cushions in place; I thought it was the real 'McCoy' you were using as a reference, not your scale version.  That is impressive!

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Thank you everyone for your kind comments they are appreciated.

 

While working on the paneling I discovered that I had in my quest to have the floor and the end wall fit through the opening in the deck I had overlooked the issues of the door opening and not fouling the area below the seat cushions, I had been so concerned with the integrity of the floor component and that it be easily removable that the stile next to the door with the hinges was wrong I had made it too short because I had a bit of tunnel vision thinking about the strength of the floor box. this picture shows the problem

 

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My thinking was focused on the side panels and how they would slip in and lock into place. so when I placed the panel into the boat it looked like this.

 

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You can see the problem. So I decided to take off the solid end wall behind the paneling and removed the short side walls that gave the inset some integrity and had a rethink. By removing the solid panel it opens up a whole new vista which is better, My it would have been better to have thought about doing the interior before getting to this stage. so now I find myself working in some tight spaces, I need one of those magic reducing spells to miniaturize myself. Oh well! so now without the side walls and end wall.

 

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In order to give the floor a better integrity I cut some new maple floorboards that run the full length of the kitchen dining area these are just laid on top of the old fir floor loose at the moment. Now with the port side panel included after adding an extension to the stiles on both sides it looks more like the one inside Integrity which I am using as a general guide.

 

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And this then makes having the door opening make more sense, because I can see through into the forward area around the mast.

 

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All I need to do now is figure out how to make all this work. I am having a lot of fun even if I take two steps forwards and one  step back half the time.

 

Michael

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, michael mott said:

 

 

 

 

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Michael, you'd have no trouble convincing me that this pic was taken in the full size boat!

Spectacular work from the keel up, inside and out.

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