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michael mott

Bristol Pilot Cutter by michael mott - 1/8 scale (POF)

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Hellppppp! someone pick me up off the floor.  I am still stunned with the level of machining and manual skills you display here Michael.  Between you and KeithAug, a collation of your various works would make the best Video/Image based tutorial for us 'apprentices'.  That is some excellent work!

 

Thanks for taking the time to document your processes.  

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Thanks for all the nice comments and likes.

 

the oblong plate has now been attached to the lock body and the lock is now fitted to the door next is the handle.

when filing the hole for the slide plate (Latch) in order to be able to file just the right amount ie file only a particular amount away it occurred to me to use something of a known thickness as a guide. (The jaws on my Grinding vice are hard, not cutting tool hard but hard enough that they only need to be dressed occasionally.) I put the blade of the thickness gauge ont the jaw and pushed the piece to be filed down to the surface of the gauge with a flat block then tightened up the vice leaving just .008" to be filed down to the jaw. 

 

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when filing the actual hole I used a different thickness the photograph was to show the principle.

 

After getting the plate shaped and drilled I set it up in the third hand to be soldered to the main plate of the lock.

 

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Then rotated the set up over so that I could add the solder to the back side .

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a small sliver of solder placed with some cleaning type flux (duzall)

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After heating with the air soldering gun rotated it back up and released

 

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A couple more 00x90 screws to hold it into place.

 

I IMG_9020x1024.jpg.9ecad325c5f80a4d077b6d1c3e44024a.jpg

I have been thinking about the handle and I am leaning toward an oval shaped one not a lever, the oval feels a bit less harsh than the lever .

 

Michael

 

 

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Well, what can one say ... a lock-smith apprentice could have done this as his test-piece (in German we have a much more impressive word: Gesellenstück)

 

I understand that knobs are preferred on boats and ships over handles, as lines or clothing can easily get caught in handles - which kind of shows the pervasive maritime tradition in Britain, where doors usually have knobs.

 

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Thanks again for the kind remarks, I settled on the oval handle I found a classic one that was for sale on Ebay so used that one as a guide  I liked the 2 inch square plate and the oval head screws. I set up the 1/2 inch collet in the square collet holder and made 4 cuts

 

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The parted them off on the lathe

 

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Next I turned up a ball and filed the sides to create the oval shape it took a bit of fettling to get the correct shape. It occurred to me that it would be best to make the square key part integral to the handle so after shaping the handle I reduced the diameter so that it could be filed square.

 

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Slowly I filed down to the 1.2 mm to fit into the square hole in the lock, I used a bit of the same square tube as the gauge while filing to dimension.

 

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then slid. the handle into the lock, just need to drill the screw holes in the plate and figure out the second handle for the back side of the door.

 

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Michael

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Michael, Amazing. I’ve read all of your builds and parts of them several times. But I’m going to reread them all from start to finish. There is so much to be learned, especially from a standard of quality point of view.

 

Kurt

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Greg, Druxey, Rick, Dirk, and Kurt, Thank you all for you kindness.

 

I have just about finished the handles now, The second Handle require a slightly different approach because I needed to insert the square tube into it. and I needed to do that under pressure so a tight fit. first the rough shaping.

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Then after getting the handle shaped the square tube was pushed into the hole.

 

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Then cut off with the Jewelers saw.

 

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I used the watchmakers key tool as a holder for the final polishing.

 

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And the handles are done.

 

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Next the square roses were drilled and countersunk IMG_9051x1024.jpg.ddb6599ba0a5ebfc771a398aa885383c.jpg

The fake screws are basically the same as the hinge screws except these are oval headed.

 

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and the back set mounted on the door as well, just four more screws.

 

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Time for a break today.

 

Michael

 

 

 

 

 

 

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But where's the lock and key? ;) :)  Just kidding - darn that is some lovely work; you Sir are a magician with brass.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Very tasty! 

 

One question, who's going to keep all the brass polished on this model... Or are you going to gold electroplate it all like they used to do with the metalwork on the old builders' boardroom models?

 

 

540x360.jpg

 

Lot 107 - MONUMENTAL BOARDROOM CASED SHIP MODEL ON STAND - The Great RMS "Mauretania", built for Cunard

 

 

Edited by Bob Cleek

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I am about to hit the 'ignore this topic' button, it makes me ache ...

 

Brass and silver were traditionally given a thin coat of zapon-lacquer to prevent tarnishing.

 

On the other hand, it seems that the handles and taps on the SEA CLOUD were gold-plated, because it was cheaper this way to keep them bright.

 

Jewellery makers supply shops sell tampon-plating sets, in case you consider.

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Steve, Pat, Bob, Geert, Eberhard, Keith and Johann thank you for you kind comments.

The front panel is now assembled and the catch plate is fitted. 

On 2/7/2020 at 12:39 PM, KeithAug said:

exquisite - only to be improved by making the end plate screw slots vertical.

I made sure the catch plate screw slots were vertical, the door will have to suffice with slanted screw slots. The tung oil really brings out the lustre of the inset panels and the ritch colour of the wood.

 

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The bottom of the panel fits into a slot in the floorboards which are now scraped Maple, there is a 1/6th bar glued across the bottom of the panel that is level with the floorboards, this allows for the door to be contained within the panel and the click when it closes is audible

 

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Next the rear panels to be glued up all the parts are cut already.  Once they are done then the side panels can be fitted as they will hook into the bulkheads at the forward and aft ends.

 

Michael

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Extremely nice work on the woodwork Michael.  As Pat has mentioned above, the grain really looks beautiful, especially now that the tung oil has been applied.  Matching the grain pattern down through the individual door panels is an elegant touch.  

 

Gary

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