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Bristol Pilot Cutter by michael mott - 1/8 scale (POF)


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29 minutes ago, TBlack said:

After all this effort, I hope these cushions are visible in the final product. But they do look classy!

Hi Tom yes they will be, I still have a couple of niggling problems to solve now.

The new foam gives a better softness to the cushions, however because I only used a single layer of 3/32 the tension on the foam and backer board hs a slight curl or cupping which can be seen in the last picture. Tomorrow morning I will glue up some backer boards with a cross laminate to prevent that from happening.

 

IMG_1777x1024.jpg.fa99deeb2ed47865510b74ca3b046fb2.jpg

 

There will also be a bit more "meat for the small nails.  I can see the end of this particular tunnel now.

 

Michael

 

 

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1 hour ago, michael mott said:

Hi Tom yes they will be, I still have a couple of niggling problems to solve now.

The new foam gives a better softness to the cushions, however because I only used a single layer of 3/32 the tension on the foam and backer board hs a slight curl or cupping which can be seen in the last picture. Tomorrow morning I will glue up some backer boards with a cross laminate to prevent that from happening.

 

IMG_1777x1024.jpg.fa99deeb2ed47865510b74ca3b046fb2.jpg

 

There will also be a bit more "meat for the small nails.  I can see the end of this particular tunnel now.

 

Michael

 

 

Good work,  good material,  good choice .     Rob

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Thank you all for your very thoughtful condolences, it helps soften the pain that welled up yesterday, even though we new her time was drawing to a close.

 

here a couple of picture from earlier in  September 2019 and March 2020

IMG_7835x1024.thumb.jpg.8f9191d51ceb934fe65b474b1253577c.jpg

 

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To the moderators, I know this is a build log so thank you for your compassion, Had I had my wits about me I would have posted the earlier picture in the Shore leave, so thank you.

 

Michael 

 

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Again thanks to you for all your kindness.

 

Today I was able to get back to doing a little work. I feel like my apprenticeship in the upholstery department has moved me forward enough to make the final set of cushions

The first picture shows the production of the seats, with all the learning steps piled up in the background. The fabric was marked and punched for the pins and then that will be done all at the same time.

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I used a steel plate to initially act as a stop for the pins then set up a 1/16th set of spacers to set the pins a little lower. after that the pins were snipped off the backside and then reset to dull the snipped ends and to ensure that all were the same depth.

 

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The starboard side cushions are ready for the coloring, the port cushions will be pinned tomorrow.

Michael

 

Edited by michael mott
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Pat, Rob, and Eberhard, Thanks for you comments and condolences. All the cushions are done now they just need the paint on the buttons. I am also in the process of remaking the floor of the cabin because it has cupped across its width. I also made it narrow enough to lift straight up out of the opening on the deck. I needed to add a little bit to the width of the floor in order to set the vertical panels properly. So instead of incremental fixes I am making a whole new floor which is actually easier . This will also take care of the slot that needed to be filled. I had a piece of nice close grained Clear fir which is the same material that the deck is made of, so have chosen to use it.

 

Michael

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Here is the new floor.

step one was to re-saw the piece of fir into some 4 inch planks

IMG_1783x1024.jpg.95ceaa1080e908a0036734be92c9ef8d.jpg

 

Next the wood was set up so the the grain was flipped end for end to create the opposite cupping like this

the planks were glued up in pairs first

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Then the six pairs were glued up in pairs again

 

IMG_1785x1024.jpg.62f7e6c2840d56819692dd6d60cfbce5.jpg

 

Then the three pieces were glued together and given a final clean up with the bench plane and shaped to fit into the hull. After the fitting it was taken back to the bench to finish fitting the seat platforms with the maple edge.

IMG_1786x1024.jpg.a5298f76e56cbb1b3e2bff712ca720e6.jpg

 

The seat edge was cut from a lovely piece of fiddle back figured maple and I only had a small piece, so I used the jewelers saw to split it down the middle.

 

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Before gluing the piece to the seat bottom I put a small chamfer on the bottom edge the top was done after it had been glued to the bottom, this gave it the rigidity and stability.

 

IMG_1791x1024.jpg.3cd5405e3b619ad67f450c8f1665d591.jpg

 

The floor was given a couple of coats of Teak oil and now to finish the port side back panels

IMG_1794x1024.jpg.09201cf8041fd977e7bb20af1c61cc1f.jpg

 

Michael

 

 

 

 

 

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Michael, I have to explain that I agonized about posting this comment. Your work on this model is nothing short of spectacular and a joy to behold. i realize the time it takes to maintain a log of this type and build a model at the same time. It probably nearly doubles the time involved, I'm sure. That said, because the level of your work is so high and your interest in accuracy so admirable, I dared post my thoughts, knowing that you may well have sound reasons for the subject of my comment. 

 

As lovely as the cabin sole you've glued up may be, in my not insignificant experience (I once worked for a yacht brokerage specializing in classic wooden vessels,) a cabin sole on a vessel such as yours would invariably be constructed of loose planks of perhaps six or eight inches in width, laid on top of the sole beams with their ends butting over a sole beam. The planks would usually have a finger hole drilled at each end and would be fitted loosely enough that they would not swell tightly and become difficult to lift. Sometimes, if there were a saloon table amidships, the plank or planks upon which the table rested were fastened to the sole beams with unplugged flush screws and the table screwed to those fastened planks. The purpose of leaving the sole planks loose was to afford easy access to the bilges below the sole to permit cleaning and to access the area for stowage. It was not uncommon, particularly in blue water cruising vessels, to take advantage of the bilge spaces to store canned provisions and other gear that didn't need to be immediately available.  The unplugged screws fastening the planks upon which a table was fastened were to permit the easy removal of the screw fastened sole plank to permit repainting the bilge on occasion. 

 

Additionally, one maxim of naval architecture is that the interior of vessels should to the greatest extent possible provide for ready access to the inside of the planking. If a serious leak develops, it is essential that the leak can be located and accessed quickly to control the damage, if possible. 

 

Again, thanks for sharing your build. It's one of the real gems of this forum!

 

 

Edited by Bob Cleek
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9 hours ago, Bob Cleek said:

Michael, I have to explain that I agonized about posting this comment. Your work on this model is nothing short of spectacular and a joy to behold. i realize the time it takes to maintain a log of this type and build a model at the same time. It probably nearly doubles the time involved, I'm sure. That said, because the level of your work is so high and your interest in accuracy so admirable, I dared post my thoughts, knowing that you may well have sound reasons for the subject of my comment. 

 

9 hours ago, Bob Cleek said:

Additionally, one maxim of naval architecture is that the interior of vessels should to the greatest extent possible provide for ready access to the inside of the planking. If a serious leak develops, it is essential that the leak can be located and accessed quickly to control the damage, if possible. 

Hi Bob Thanks for your comments Please whenever something that I make seems to be in error of simply flat out wrong let me know. Having sailed in a small boat I know just how important it is to be able to clean out those deep difficult to reach places. As you know I have been using Stirling and Sons yacht "Integrity" for inspiration. The interior is so well fitted that it completely missed my attention that of course access to the bilges would have been accounted for. They just did such a good job of being subtle about it that it slipped to the back of the deep recess of my brain.

These few pictures from the web a few years ago that were used in a sales pitch by a yacht broker show what I mean, I have searched for the attribution for them but cannot find it so if there is a problem with them let me know and I will remove them.

31Saloontableup.thumb.jpg.2395b534f47b05729e7f239fd44326b2.jpg

37Ownerscabinvfwd.jpg.70e1f11b9110cb16192a141652255343.jpg

42ChartsGalleyaft.jpg.5d6c6cc3c03e5c3982bd00f29c7e2a83.jpg

30Galleychartssaloon.jpg.7a978ec5bc8ef4b7790c6b6e9bcd5733.jpg

 

Fortunately because all the interior components of my interior can be removed so that I can add the 100 lbs of lead when it finally goes for a free sail.

I will make some changes to the whole floor so as to make it look as if the floor has some loose planks. But for the integrity of making the cabin interior relatively easy to assemble and hold together inside I will keep it as a single piece.

Again Bob don't hesitate to give me critical insights and information to enable me to learn and improve things.

 

8 hours ago, WalrusGuy said:

Did you use any other jigs to cut this straight line? Or was it purely done with the jewelers saw? 

This cut was just freehand with the jewelers saw, I had to come from both ends because the throat of the saw was not deep enough, I followed a pencil line.

 

Michael

 

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This guys must have devised another way of lifting up the floor boards then. They fit indeed very snuggly. From the few sailing trips I did with friends around the Mediterranean and the Carribean (I am only holding an inland waterways certificate), I remember that filled the bilge with conserves and bottles (not only water ;) ) and that boards usually had finger hole.

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