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I am presently starting a second log. I am not even 2 years into this hobby, plugging away at a Caldercraft kit, the HM Granado, and have now started a new (old) build. My neighbour purchased this kit 25 years ago in 1989 and completed it to the stage shown in the pictures below. Unfortunately, that is where it has sat for 24.5 years and fortunate for me though is that he has passed the kit on to me. I was very surprised at the quality of his work, certainly better that what I would have done on my first effort and maybe even on a second effort for me, specifically with respect to the planking. The kit though has some definite misgivings.

 

1) There is no instructions at all - not sure if they were present originally and subsequently lost but for me I have had to do a lot of research both on MSW and with a co-worker of my wife's who to my surprise has built 3 Bluenose and Bluenose II kits and lucky for me, was able to provide me with his instruction manuals and plans to refer to.

2) The quality of the kit components is certainly not up to par with the Caldercraft kit  - for example plastic deadeyes and blocks which I will surely replace with wooden items.

3) Some missing parts but certainly easy to scratch build - for example the rudder and the cradle. 

4) There are some minor mistakes and deviations from the plans made by my neighbour, but easy to fix.

 

There are some positive items to the present build and kit though.

 

1) The hull is single planked but my neighbour has done a very good job (in my estimation). The nail holes are nicely countersunk and with a fine layer of wood filler, the hull is ready for primer and paint.

2) The deck planking needs a simple fine sand and is basically ready for a protective varnish.

3) The fixes that are required are easy to do - for example at the transom. Also I feel that I should first put some fake stanchions to make it more to the proper and original form. I should also cut some scuppers into the hull which I find more appealing to the model. And I will also have to create a waterway which I presume will have to be masked off and simply spray painted, first with primer and then a paint, given the current state of the model and difficulty getting a brush into the bulwarks and stanchions.

 

There is a current build on MSW of this same original kit, presently not on the market, at this scale anyways, done by 7Provinces. Hopefully we will be able to collaborate a bit and I think the model will turn out quite well. Not sure on how fast my progress will be as I currently have another build on the go.

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Edited by mrcc
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Hi Julian,

 

It's interesting to see this "other interpretation" of the same kit to compare with. I can see that the original builder also did not use the original instructions by Billing Boats. Or just chose to do things differently. The rail is an example. According to BB this is just one long strip. I have seen the technique used by the original builder in the Model Shipways (kit 2130) instructions. Both the BB and MS instructions can be found in the internet by the way. I try to find my own way and use both instructions for reference. Anyway the absence of the BB instructions is not a big loss  ;) .

Interesting also to see how the deck was done. This is one of the flaws in my model which I intend to deal with soon.

I am interested to see what you will do with the fake stanchions as well. I am working on these as well at the moment. It looks like I will put three fake stanchions between each pair of bulkhead stanchions. But from pictures I am not sure whether or not this would be the same throughout the length of the ship. At least at the aft there seem to be fewer stanchions (visible). 

 

Great to see you have started your Bluenose log, I will definitely be following it closely!

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Thanks Alan, Jan-Willem,

 

I think my neighbour (the original builder) may have taken some liberties with the plans, slight as it may be. The problem now for me, especially with the cap railing on is to fit the fake stanchions in. I think I will just stick one in the middle as see how it looks. Jan-Willem, maybe try two between each fixed stanchion (bulwark) and see how it looks. I certainly feel that this Billings kit may not be true in any sense but I am sure it will look great in the end.

 

I will post some progress / pictures later this weekend.

 

Cheers,

Julian

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I have had a couple of weekends to complete some work... but only now able to show progress.

 

I added the fake stanchions which the kit never asked for, I added one between each of the bulwark stanchions already in place. Perhaps should have done two between each which likely reflects the real number on the original ship. Certainly looks better in my eyes.

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So I have now come to a hiccup... I decided to create scuppers. I did some research, whether correct or not and made 11 in the fore deck and 8 in the aft deck. I drilled a 0.5 mm hole in the inside going outside tight against the stanchions as a reference and with a small file created the rest of the cut-out from the outside in. When you are in the middle of the work, you don't realize how much material you are taking out and perhaps I got over zealous and only upon resting after the work that I noticed that the cut-outs are out of scale and are now perhaps too big. I have tried a fix as evident in the last picture and hope to get opinions on whether to fill with a small length of 1mm planking and then sand back to create perhaps a more realistic look for the rest of the scuppers or leave as is. Not sure...?

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This might work as a fix to at least try on one hole....

1) make a long tapered rectangular plug (long enough to handle) of the finished size you desire

2) give it a thin coat of releasing agent (vasoline?)

3) insert it into the oversize hole and fill around it with wood putty

4) let it dry for 30 minutes or more

5) pull out the tapered plug and see how it looks

carefully file/sand to finish if it works

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Hi Julian,

 

I see that you got your hands on a Billing Boats manual after all  ;) Not that it is of much use but at least for the deck structures it might be handy. And wow, you are speeding forward! Looking good on the transom and on the deck structures!

Please be aware that the grate at the wheel is located starboard of the wheel, not in front as suggested by the drawings!

 

On the BB drawings the scuppers are oversized. I understood that there is one on each side of a stanchion (makes 2 between 2 stanchions). From pictures of the original I would say they cannot be larger than 1 mm (height) and 3-4 mm long. That said, I think sometimes small items must be a bit out of proportions to make them visible. And the proportions of the ship are not right anyway...

 

As to the stanchions: since you have placed a fake stanchion in the middle between each bulkhead stanchion, you still have the option to add 2 addional ones, one on each side of the fake stanchion, bringing the total to 3. I have been experimenting the past few days and I think I will do 3 fake stanchions between each 2 bulkhead stanchions. To me this looks best. As to the original, it had even more stanchions, judging from the pictures...

 

Cheers,

Jan-Willem

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Hi Jan-Willem,

 

Thanks for the notice on the grate placement. I noticed your recent log post with the stanchions... looks good!

The issue for me was that the railing was already on and it was difficult enough to cut and place a single stanchion between each bulwark stanchion. I took the liberty to just place the single one and yes its not true to the original plan of the Bluenose but it looks good enough for me. 

 

With regards to the build manual... I snooped around and found the most recent manual to the Billings 1:65 scale on the internet. PM me if you wish the copy to be emailed to you.

 

Cheers,

Julian

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Oh yes Alan, thanks for your input... interesting!

 

Have you tried it and does the plug come out easily after the wood filler has set a bit (given the Vaseline coating)?

I could make a standard plug and just run through all the openings with it.

 

Julian

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I confess to not having done this on models but have seen it done elsewhere

must be tapered to pull back outwards freely without damaging anything

will it work on such a tiny hole... you never know until you try one

make sure you allow adequate drying time for the wood putty (commercial sawdust and glue)

Edited by AON
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Julian, re. scuppers I would cut a piece of wood from a plank which has the right thickness and glue it in. It is fine when the plank sticks out on the outside of the hull (easier to place the piece) and it is ok when the plank does not fit 100%. Try to get it flush with the inside of the hull however, since this side will be difficult to sand since you have the rails already in place.

Then when the glue is dry cut or sand off the excess plank on the outside of the hull and fill the gaps with filler. Other methods will surely work as well but this would be my choice since it is easy and fail-proof (in my opinion).

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Julian,

 

re. the instructions: I downloaded the instructions for BB576 from the billing boats site about a year ago in the hope they would be improved over the course of the last 20 years. However, these proved to be identical to the printed version in my kit. But I notice they do not mention a scale. Are your instructions for kit nr. 576?

As to your decision about the stanchions, I fully understand that, as I too have made the decision not to change the work done before and only enhance the kit where it makes sense (enough information at hand, not too difficult and enough "gain").

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Thanks Alan, Jan-Willem for your advice...

 

I will try the small piece of plank/wood and sand from the outside back and then wood fill and sand again.

 

With regards to the instructions, I just found them on the internet at the Billing Boat website just last month.

They are just a generic set of instructions with not much direction, scale unknown. Luckily I still have the plan drawings.

 

I will provide an update with photos early next week as I typically only work on the model on the weekends...

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Last weekend... I worked at my correction on the scuppers. I filled the top or bottom of the scupper with a small 1mm width of plank and inserted it to where I thought the proper line would be as some of my original cut outs wandered a bit and with the fill and then sand was able to correct that issue as well. I think it turned out well.

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I then added some wood filler and with some sanding, got my first coat of primer on. This is my outdoor sanding station FYI. Very relaxing with or without Tecate.

 

I will reassess the finish on the hull and with some minor wood fill and then another coat of primer should be ready for paint.

 

Between coats of primer, I was planning on using 220 grit sand paper. Too much or should I go higher in grit?

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scuppers look good to me!

(for me) when it comes to sanding you have to do what feels right to you.... always depends on how much needs to be removed

I do like your sanding workroom (and am a bit jealous)

 

I think you've done well ...but what I think doesn't matter ... it is all about how do you feel?

 

As the cap'n said to me many time .... carry on!

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Wow Julian, looking good on the scuppers. And I agree with Alan on your sanding workplace.

As for sanding between coats of primer I think I would start with 220 as well (after the first coat). You are not going to remove anything serious anymore are you? So I think what you need to watch for is that the sandpaper is fine enough to not leave scratches big enought to show through the next coat of paint or primer. This should work with 220. But as the number of coats increase the surface gets smoother (this is the idea, right ;) ) and then you might want to get a 320 or 400 or even higher (be careful not to scratch the paint with the pointy edges of the sandpaper though).

It also depends on your painting method. If you use a brush the paint layer is fairly thick (as compared to spray paint or airbrush) and the paint will flow and cover up small scratches. I used to make wooden models of products like phones, home appliances, etc. in my days as an industrial designer which I painted with a spray gun. Then the paint coat is very thin (like airbrush) and you see absolutely every irregularity underneath. For these models I could not use 220 on the primer because one wipe would clear the model of any primer. With these models I used 220 and 320 on the wood, 600 and 800 on the primer and 1000 and 1200 on the first coat of paint. If I was to airbrush or spraypaint my Bluenose, I would do the same. 

 

I hope this helps.

:cheers:

Edited by 7 Provinces
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As I only work on my model on the weekends, I do not have much to report but I did manage to do the rudder and do a second coat of primer on the hull . The only concern is that I did some extra filling after the first coat of primer and found that I perhaps did not sand it back enough even though I triple checked for smoothness against the rest of the hull. Or perhaps I have to do a second coat of primer on the newly filled and single primed surfaces and then reassess.

 

The other issue is that I have to attach the narrow strips of 2.3 x 2.3 mm strip of spruce that I bought at the local hobby store to create the narrow upper wale along both sides. I bought the spruce thinking it is a bit sturdier and of a harder wood that the basawood strips in the kit and can weather the "storm" this next year of  modelling and handling the hull.

 

The only worry on this is attaching to a primed surface - can I presume that PVA or wood glue will work or should I just use CA glue? I do not want to sand just a narrow strip on this newly primed and pristine surface just so I can use wood glue if CA will do the job, even though working with PVA is safer and easier. Any thoughts?

 

Thanks.

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Edited by mrcc
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Thanks Keith for your advise...

 

It is such a small (2.3 x 2.3mm) piece of wood that along the length of the hull, I might just take my chance and apply directly over the primed surface with wood glue. Worse case scenario, I will then try CA glue.

 

Julian 

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