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Getting CA glue off your fingers


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Not sure if this is the right place to post this but if it isn't please move it.

 

After a session at the work table I always manage to get a layer of super glue on my finger tips.  I try scrubbing it off with soap and water but end up waiting for it to flake off over time.  I decided to experiment with other items around the bathroom sink to see if I could do a better job.  Turns out hand lotion works pretty well.  I put a drop on each finger tip and rub them together.  With in a short time the glue starts to come off.  Only takes a few minutes and I don't have the feeling of dry skin I usually have with CA glue residues.

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I'm with Druxey, don't use CA and there isn't a problem.

As a chemist, acetone is the universal organic solvent, finger nail polish remover is a very dilute version of that., but it has its issues too.

 

Like Andy, I typically use a bit of sand paper or a rasp or file. This helps prepare your fingers for safe cracking also  :dancetl6:

 

They do sell a CA de-bonder also but I don't know how well it would works, as I switched to PVA early on in building.

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Hi grsjax,

 

I remember and registrated with interest that fellow member Dan Vadas once mentioned that the detergent   Isopropyl Alkohol   would  help work for removing wooden CA glued parts, in the Joint, so why not remove those nasty already cured CA flakes from the fingertips, but I did not try it out yet. What I find is more serious is how to explain to your wife how you managed to get some CA Drops onto your second best trousers. Can These ever be removed ?, I do`nt think so. rubbing on the Cloth only gives a spot lighter shade of blue on the jeans

 

 

Nils

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Zap and other companies make a product called debonder or super glue remover.  If your fingers are stuck together, your can squirt a bit on the bond and working it down, will allow you to pull your fingers apart without the skin coming off.  Rubbing it over super glue encrusted fingers will remove most if not all of the glue and you can then use soap and water.

 

Works the same with a product called liquid skin or liquid band-aid.  They are even using a super glue variant in surgery instead of sewing or staples.

 

Jeff

Edited by jdbradford
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Hi grsjax,

 

I remember and registrated with interest that fellow member Dan Vadas once mentioned that the detergent   Isopropyl Alkohol   would  help work for removing wooden CA glued parts, in the Joint, so why not remove those nasty already cured CA flakes from the fingertips, but I did not try it out yet. What I find is more serious is how to explain to your wife how you managed to get some CA Drops onto your second best trousers. Can These ever be removed ?, I do`nt think so. rubbing on the Cloth only gives a spot lighter shade of blue on the jeans

 

 

Nils

 

The alcohol is for removing, debonding PVA or carpenter's glue.   CA needs acetone as the alcohol won't do it.  It might get CA off the fingers though.

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Fun conversations! CA debonder is gelled acetone with an acetone masking agent.  The purpose of the gel is to keep the highly volatile acetone longer on the super glue you want to remove. I use nail polish remover from CVS. It has a little fountain thingy that lets you get just the right amount of remover. It also has something in it to lessen the skin and nail drying effect of the acetone. I use a Q-tip to remove CA from my model. I rub the remover from between my fingers to get CA off.

 

Biggest problem with acetone is that it very volatile and easily catches fire..

 

I know why Druxley says don't use it. What I can't understand is why museums are placing all their bets on PVA except those who want to go back to animal hide glue..  PVA is very UV and water sensitive which is why there are no PVA emulsion based exterior house paints. On the other hand, it  bonds wood well, is non-toxic and is easily removed with alcohol. Most macro wood workers have gone to modified PVA formulations.  Maybe, the NRG should convince a university to do a glue study.

Best

Jaxboat B)

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Your not alone Chuck,

there is nothing like getting the plank perfectly placed, then finding your finger is not so perfectly placed... Then while you pull your finger loose the plank breaks loose, starting the whole process over :rolleyes:. After this happening with my petersboro canoe build several times I decided to go with PVA on the next build.

 

and Jaxboat, I think the PVA studies are going on.... the results should be back in about 100 - 200 years ;) By then it will be too late though.

I've never trusted life-time studies. I remember when CD-R's first hit the market and some companies were claiming "tested for a 50 year lifespan". Then 5 years later they wouldn't read due to oxidation issues. Time is the only true test. ...which strangely hide glue seems to have passed, based on contemporary models dating back to that time range.

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Don't know if this is helpful or not, but a while ago I bought a great little tool called a SQUADRON PRECISION CYANOACRYLATE APPLICATOR. it is a small stainless steel rod with a sort of hook shaped end. It if fantastic for applying CA glue a drop at a time. I use the Zap brand of glue and usually pour some onto the bottom of an upturned empty glass jar when I need to use it. Dipping the applicator into the glue transfers a drop to the applicator and then you can transfer it to your work in the same manner. I used it to complete the coppering of my Norfolk in combination with tweezers and 'pokey, pointy' things from my dentist's set. I hardly got a drop of CA on my fingers and so avoided the messy clean up. I have used it to successfully apply a drop of glue to many other bits n pieces as well.

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Yes nail polish remover is the best solution but don't use it on your model to take off excess CA--it can discolour wood and leave white stains that are hard to sand out.

 

Also, if you are sensitive to CA fumes, you will definitely want to use the remover in a very well ventilated place because the combination of the two is really nasty!

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My wife complained the other day when she asked for me to rub the back of her neck about how rough my fingers felt and that I needed to use something to get rid of the glue. I said "NEVER, I wear my glued up fingers proudly and like it's a badge of honor". Then she began following me around the house with a piece of my own sandpaper. :bird-vi:

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At work we had a job where we had to bend neoprene together.  The customer specified a CA made for rubber and plastic.  Safety rules forced us to get rid of our solvents toluene and acetone.  Found out that Vaseline hand lotion with petroleum jelly would do the job.  Took awhile though.

David B

 

 

 

 

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