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GuntherMT

Armed Virginia Sloop by GuntherMT - FINISHED - Model Shipways - scale 1:48

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Holly friggin rigging! So glad I found and added this build log. I have been drooling at the chance of cutting my teeth on my own AVS. I also really like how the sections are labeled and separated. I hope this log stays up for while to use it as a supplement when I start construction. Very impressive build. (we're not worthy, we're not worthy) lol. 

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Great looking rigging Brian - maybe you mentioned it elsewhere here - but did you replace the kit supplied rope? Whatever you're using it looks really nice

hamilton

 

Thank you hamilton,

 

All of the rigging, ropes, blocks, hearts, dead-eyes, and hooks - everything except for the bullseyes, are from Chuck at Syren Ship Model Company, as are the gun barrels (both swivels and main guns) and the main gun carriages.  The deck is holly planking from Hobby Mill, and the masting is all Boxwood from Crown Timberyard.

 

Holly friggin rigging! So glad I found and added this build log. I have been drooling at the chance of cutting my teeth on my own AVS. I also really like how the sections are labeled and separated. I hope this log stays up for while to use it as a supplement when I start construction. Very impressive build. (we're not worthy, we're not worthy) lol. 

 

I certainly have no plan to take the log down Philthy, and I'm very happy if it helps anyone with their own build of this kit (or even something else!).

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Thanks all, will get back to working on the final details tomorrow.  I've been pretty busy this week since finishing the anchors and haven't done anything since.  Today was day one of sailing lessons, and I'm completely exhausted, so probably not a great time to work on the ship!

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So I haven't made much progress since my last update, and I've discovered that I don't really like rope coils very much.  Seems like a great thing to dislike given my subject choices, hahaha.. 

 

In any case, I'm working on getting a jig that makes coils I like, and I think I'm getting somewhat close, but still not there.

 

I started working at the stern, and I'm done with the stern, quarter-deck, boom, and shrouds now.  

 

post-14925-0-71816700-1444019245_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-72791800-1444019246_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-31393300-1444019247_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-35388200-1444019248_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-26660400-1444019249_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-73807100-1444019249_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-19351900-1444019250_thumb.jpg

 

The coils are taking much longer than I expected them to, but oh well.  Getting a bit better as I go along.

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The coils look really good.  How about showing us your jigs for making them?

 

That would require that I was taking pictures as I went through them.  :)  I was mostly just using toothpicks (round) stuck in Balsa along with another flat toothpick for the tail end that hangs out.  Now that I think I've got the spacing about right, I'll find something that the glue won't stick to as easily, probably brass tubing, as I don't have any appropriately sized nails to use.  Pretty much the same thing as Dan Vadas used here - http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/230-hms-vulture-by-dan-vadas-1776-148-scale-16-gun-swan-class-sloop-from-tffm-plans-completed/page-101?hl=%2Brope+%2Bcoil#entry339219

 

I tried using the tiny brass nails, but they ended up too narrow, without any gap in the center of the coils to work with to hang them (before I started leaving the tail hanging out as part of the coil building process) and I kept messing up the coils trying to widen them after.  I then used multiple brass nails at either end, and it works 'ok', but the round toothpicks ended up being just about the right size I think.

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Yep, that's Alistair's log, I've used it a lot on my build as a reference and inspiration.  It's pretty much the same thing that I referenced from Dan Vadas, except that Dan showed the rope 'loop' coming out of the coils to use to hang the coil on the cleats, which is the way that all the ships I saw in San Diego hung their rope coils.  It's a very similar jig, with an extra pin.  I'll try to get in the other room tonight long enough to take a picture, had a very late day and just got home.

Edited by GuntherMT

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Ok, so I made one coil on the latest iteration of the jig.

 

The brass is cut at a 45 degree angle at one end and just stabbed into the balsa block so adjusting the size of the coils is a simple matter of moving them to different spots on the block.

 

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I put the scrap plank underneath to keep the rope off of the block for a couple of reasons.  So that the rope doesn't stick to the balsa since it's so soft, it's easy to pull up pieces of the balsa that need to be cleaned off.  The space underneath allows easy threading of the rope on coils that I want to tie off in the middle.  Finally, the space makes it much easier to push the rope off the brass from underneath without messing up the coil.  

 

post-14925-0-98854000-1444110972_thumb.jpg

 

This rope coil I made overly large on purpose to see how it would look sort of folded up against a bulkhead, as there were plenty of coils that were done like this on the ships I saw in San Diego, so I figured I'd try it.  Easy enough to pull it off if I decide I don't like it.

 

post-14925-0-65487100-1444110973_thumb.jpg

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Great work Brian

I did say my method might not be accurate and you've proved it so! Despite the brilliance of your rigging I'll leave mine be and learn for the next time.

 

Cheers

Alistair

 

I certainly wouldn't change yours Alistair, this is a hobby in which we are constantly learning, and going back to completed projects just doesn't make any sense to me.  I've seen plenty of models with coils done like yours, and I've seen photo's of museum models with coils done both like yours, and in other ways that don't make any sense at all (like open coils laying all around the belaying points on the deck to the point where it would be impossible to get to the belaying points without crossing two rings of rope coils).

 

If I hadn't gone to the Festival of Sail in San Diego, I'd probably be more than happy to do them by hanging the top of the coils over the belaying points, but since I saw them on both working ships, and the museum ship (Surprise) done differently, that's what my new goal is.

 

Here are some of the photo's I took while in San Diego that I'm sort of trying to use as a reference while finishing this up.

 

post-14925-0-28050200-1444199012_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-32531200-1444199013_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-88529700-1444199013_thumb.jpg

 

The method that they hang the coils from the belaying points is actually really simple.  They make up the rope coil, then grab the line that remains between the belay point and the coil, pull it through the coil, twist the loop formed by that rope, and stick the end of that loop over the end of the belaying pin/cleat, and bam, the coil is hung!

 

I've been playing with methods of using the actual end of the line from the rigging to loop over the coil in the same way, but it's really difficult to get it to hang right, so I switched to making the 'hanging' loop from the coil itself.  This method works much easier, but I lose the detail of the rope loop coming from inside of the coil and over it, but it's pretty likely that the only person that would ever notice that detail would be me.  :)

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Ever so slowly I am working my way through the rope coils.  I just haven't found a lot of time lately to work on them.  I started at the stern, finished all the ones up to the mast (including the shroud cleat ones), then tonight, finally finished the ones at the base of the mast.  All I have left is all the ropes at the bow now (going to be crowded!).

 

Here is a picture of the little balsa-wood jig in use with 3 coils in various states of the glue soaking in and drying, followed by a couple pictures of the way the base of the mast turned out.  The tooth-pick with alligator clamps thing in the photo is holding that last coil in position while it dries, hopefully staying in position when I remove it!

 

post-14925-0-02360900-1444530544_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-94500300-1444530544_thumb.jpgpost-14925-0-40672100-1444530545_thumb.jpg

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