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Chuck

HM Cutter Cheerful - 1806 - 1:48 scale by Chuck

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Planking with a minimum number of  - or no - stealers at all is quite possible and practical, except in the case of an extremely full, bluff bow. It is a matter of taking time to plan the planking layout and run of strakes before ever laying a single plank. Planking by the seat of one's pants will not end well!

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Everything below the wale,   I did include the garboard......... I actually have a second planking draft that is slightly different and shows 21....this one is just more clear  to post,  not to confuse the situation.  There are also two deck plans.  All original but with slight differences.   The important thing to note however is that they are identical in showing no steelers and the one drop plank.

 

When I started planking,  I had two versions of my own plans ready to go....I found that after doing the math,  the 20 strake scheme was a perfect match to fit 3/16" wide planks mid ship in two belts.   Once the hull was lined off and I divided into two belts, below.   Each ten plank belt divided up into perfect 3/16" wide strakes at the center bulkhead.

 

liningout.jpg

 

liningout1.jpg

 

The break at the square tuck divided the hull perfectly with ten strakes in each belt.   Whereas the one that showed 21 strakes would need a funky smaller fraction.    Its a lot easier to rip 3/16" wide planks and its a standard wood thickness to buy,  so I went with that one.

 

As a side note....I added the drop plank and the first two strakes in the first belt before I lined off the hull.  It just made it easier to do the lining off.  Thats why you can see them in the picture while I lined out the hull.

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Chuck,

Thanks for all the information.  I now understand how to bend the planks to fit the curves rather than trying to puzzle them into place.  Now I just need to remember this when I do my next build.

 

Richard.

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As a side note....I added the drop plank and the first two strakes in the first belt before I lined off the hull.  It just made it easier to do the lining off.  Thats why you can see them in the picture while I lined out the hull.

 

Thanks for all the details Chuck.  The only thing that I'm left unclear on - was the drop plank and it's buddy (i.e. the first two strakes in the first belt) included in the 20, or extra?  I think if I understand everything they are included, so there are 20 planks including these and the garboard, correct?

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Yupp it was included.   Just like the original draft I posted.  But I knew they were all 3/16" planks at the center of the hull so it wouldnt effect that.   So adding them before lining out made it easier to visualize the eight remaining planks in the first belt.   

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Thanks Chuck.  It's all about learning techniques that work.  I've never edge bent a plank before, but since I'm working from your Cheerful plans, and have seen how well (and easy) you make it look, this will be my first.

Great discussion!!!

Maury

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My two cents

Everything could be scaled down except for the wood grain.

The real ship builder could bend the plank a lot easier than the modeler does, because the grain in the modelers plank is 50 times the scale of the real thing. Any oak or maple grain in a real ship will be impossible to reduce to sale. Even boxwood scaled up to real life dimensions will translate into a grain not suitable for planking. It probably will be like building a ship of the line out of bamboo.

The modeler works around those limitations and Chuch has found the best way to do it (having tried all of the above and never being happy with the results)

I say more cutting and less plastering makes the modeler more proud of his work

Edited by Guillermo Madico

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One other observation and question Chuck, I know from your builds that you use CA to fasten your planking - but your progress shots always look so pristine.... I also use CA but my hulls look like they are diseased with splotches, pencil lead and bits of my fingers glued to them until I sand them down - how do you keep your hulls so clean? Is there a certain applicator you use to control the glue? Or is it your technique? 

 

Lou

Edited by ASAT

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The picture above seems to show The Charles Morgan with lots of drop planks.  It actually shows the lines of coper plates in the middle of the whaler restoration. The picture bellow shows Charles Morgan in bright sunlight after coper plates and paint were removed. Both pictures could be found at the Mystic Sea Port Museum with a lots more of contemporary real scale ship building and planking with modern and not so modern tools. Really nice stuff.  

 

PD I beleive the gentlemen in the picture are part of the restoration crew 

post-318-0-69323900-1425739808_thumb.jpg

Edited by Guillermo Madico

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Lou,

 

Basically I just sand the heck out of it to remove any CA that may have absorbed into the wood.  Using Boxwood is also an advantage as its dense.  The glue doesnt absorb very deep at all.  So I am not afraid to sand the hull very smooth and thin down the planking.  Typical planking is not a scale 3" thick.  In fact,  the topside planking above the wales on Cheerful was only 1.5" thick.   Its actually noted on the planking draft.  So using 1/16" thick strips is way out of scale.  This is why I actually used 3/64" thick strips and then sanded them down considerably after I was done which thinned them down to about 1/32" or so.   This way you get to the nice clean wood that is blemish-free.

 

FYI....The wales were 4" thick and the bottom planking under the wales was 2.25" thick as noted on the original planking expansion.

 

Chuck

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So do you sand them as you install each strake or do you put a few on and then sand them together? i guess it really doesn't matter but It doesn't look like the planks you have already installed need any more sanding, or will you do a final sand after you have completed the planking? Or is it you don't post a picture until what you have done is looking pristine?   :D  Your "in work" models always look so awesome, I thought maybe I was doing something wrong.....  

 

Lou

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I sand a little bit after every four or five planks.  Then I apply one coat of wipe-on-poly.  It helps to keep it clean with the wipe on poly.  Then after the entire side is planked....its sanded down and finished again.  Then once again after treenailing.

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Just finished planking the port side.  I added the stern post.   Now to treenail the port side and add the molding... :)  It feels good to have it all planked.  It will feel even better when the treenailing is done.   I was getting tired of seeing the hull without its stern post.  I think it really makes a difference at this point.   At least from the starboard side.

 

sternposton2.jpg

 

sternposton3.jpg

 

sternposton1.jpg

 

sternposton.jpg

 

cheerfulhull.jpg

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Love that stern shot. The square-tuck and hull side planking blend in beautiful with the stern-post.

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The port side is done and treenailed. I also made the horse shoe plates for the stem and keel plate at the stern.  These were laser cut from laserboard.  I painted and glued them on.  They have little holes cut through them as you can see.  The beauty of that is after gluing them with yellow glue and placing them on the model....a little bit of glue seeps through the holes and forms a nail head.  But if you dont want to do that,  you can drill through the holes with a #78 bit and insert some 28 gauge wire as bolt heads.  ....Or   just leave it as is.  I will be drilling and inserting the wire as bolt heads later on.  Also all of the fancy molding is in position that I want to add at this point.   Now its time to thin down the bulwarks inboard.  FUN ....FUN!!!  :)

 

Chuck

 

horseshoeplates.jpg

 

horseshoeplates1.jpg

 

horseshoeplates3.jpg

 

horseshoeplates2.jpg

 

horseshoeplates4.jpg

 

sternmolding.jpg

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Hi Chuck

 

When will you add these little jewells to the parts for sale on the Cheerful? 

 

Just finished the treenailing on my Royal Caroline this weekend. I also have all of the Cheerful parts cut out and sitting in a drawer with all of the other parts for it in my Syren tool box just waiting for me to start on this build.

 

Keith

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Yes indeed!!   This will be used for the port lid hinges as well.  I may add them this week just to see how they work.  But it will be a while before I add them to the store.  I want to include a few other elements like the gudgeons and pintles.   Thats a little ways off yet.  Sort of a metal-works package.   Most of it anyway.  But there will be some brass used where extra strength is needed.   That wont be included with this.

 

Chuck

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I just wondered after seeing your latest - How will you be creating the hole for the rudder?  I realize you will need a hole, but what is your technique?

Thanks.

Edited by KenW

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You are referring to the rudder port?.......No special technique really.  I will just drill a pilot hole as large as my preferred needle file.  Then I will slowly enlarge it to shape.   Its interseting to note that the stern post should have extended through the counter as well.  I designed it so another small piece will be glued inboard to fake it.   No one will ever know.  In fact it will look like you have the tightest planking joints around the stern post to allow it to pass through so nicely.

 

Chuck

 

rudderport.jpg

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I just came back from the monthly SMSNJ meeting in Millburn, NJ. This was my first time there and I cannot say enough about how nice it was meeting some of its members there, including Chuck. Take my word for it, Chuck's build log photos as good as they are don't really show how beautiful this build really is.

 

Mike

Edited by Stuntflyer

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