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Nenseth

La Belle 1684 by Nenseth - 1:36 scale

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hi hans christian

great work so far.i shall be following very closely as this ship is on my "to do" list.

look forward to your progress.

cheers.............mick

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Nice work so far, Hans Christian. Use a water-based glue and wash off any excess before it sets. Then there won't be any glue stains.

 

If it's any help, I built my first big framed model (over a metre long) on my dining room table!

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1mm should be possible to sand away, either with disk sander or 220 grit sandpaper fixed on the table top with some clamps.

I just did it today, needed 4mm and 5mm thickness, but had only 8mm wood sheet  :angry:

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Life settled down abit and I´m back at it again.

 

This is my first go at carving so I don´t have high hopes but it must be done 🤨

 

So far

   -Six frames done

   -One in assembly

   -Five others cut out

 

Slow going but happy to start up again

20190927_104646.jpg

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Hans,

 

Nice work and an interesting project.

 

A question.  Does the ANCRE monograph include an lines drawing of the vessel?  I believe that some of their monographs include only lofted frame shapes but no complete lines drawings.

 

Roger

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Thanks for all the likes 😁

 Roger, the monograph does indeed include line drawings of the vessel.

 

I´ll see if I can dig up some clay druxey, it might help doing it that way. Thanks for the tip.

 

And all the forward frames are done (roughly)

20191006_223746.thumb.jpg.33443d3e7ad8b30ee00b0caa643e1939.jpg

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On 10/27/2019 at 11:45 AM, Nenseth said:

Just browsing through my collection.

For some reason it looks to small 🤔

Any suggestions as to what is an essential book that is missing?

20191027_114143.jpg

Dear Hans,

 

 I would strongly recommend to buy the book, written by Henri Louis Duhamel de Monceau, the "Beginning of the art of shipbuilding" or "practical treatise about shipbuilding". - I must admit, I currently don't even know if there is an english translation available. So the title in english may be a bit different than what I wrote.

 

It was originally written in french in 1752 or so. - So it is not too much older than the Belle, but you will have a hard time, to find something useful, before that time, about french shipbuilding.

If you know German better than French, then you might try to find the German translation. it was translated to German in 1791 and there exist facsimilie books, reprinted in 1973 by Horst Hamecher in Kassel.

 

It includes several illustrations (alone 18 big plan sheets) and many tables, too and has close to 600 pages.

 

It is clearly the best book you can buy for the Belle!

 

Best regards,

Herbert

 

 

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On 10/27/2019 at 3:45 AM, Nenseth said:

Just browsing through my collection.

For some reason it looks to small 🤔

Any suggestions as to what is an essential book that is missing?

20191027_114143.jpg

 

I'm surprised you do not have "From a Watery grave: The Discovery and Excavation of La Salle's Shipwreck, La Belle." It's a fantastic book with boatloads of information on the ship, artifacts, and history of the expedition. It's written by the gentleman who oversaw the excavation.

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Watery-Grave-Discovery-Excavation-Shipwreck/dp/1585444316  

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My book recommendation would be:

 

Les Trois-Ponts du Chevalier de Tourville, 1680.

 

Although La Belle represents the smallest of armed vessels - the barque longue - she is a microcosm (IMO) of all of the larger ships of the line, from this time period.

 

From a general construction standpoint - what applies to the big ships, would mostly also apply to the smaller ships.

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Wow thanks for all your suggestions.

Some of these books I`ve seen, some not. I will try to look into them all next week when my head clears of this cold I got.

 

Thanks again 

 

Presently working on assembling more frames (all now cut) and the rabbet.

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1 hour ago, Oliver1973 said:

Dont forget the rabbet before you start the assembly !

Nothing is assembled yet.

 

Anyone have some suggestions about how to temporarily fix the frames to the keel? 

So it is easier to sand the correct shape. Some kind of glue which can be 'unstuck' somehow later perhaps..? 

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1 hour ago, Nenseth said:

Anyone have some suggestions about how to temporarily fix the frames to the keel? 

So it is easier to sand the correct shape. Some kind of glue which can be 'unstuck' somehow later perhaps..? 

PVA glue is soluble in isopropol alcohol. Placing a slip of paper between the faying surfaces before gluing a part will make it much easier to separate the part thereafter. the glue and paper can then be scraped from the surfaces and/or soaked off with isopropol alcohol. I've also had success with the judicious use of hot-melt glue from craft glue guns. ("The Martha Stewart school of ship modeling?") The less tenacious hot-melt glue sticks come apart pretty easily and that can be assisted by a bit of gentle heat from a heat gun.

 

The jig you are using will provide a surprising amount of rigidity when combined with a temporary batten or three to a side. (The battens can be tied to the frames with string or wire. "Spacer sticks" cut to the width of the frame spaces can be hot-melt glued to the top of the upper jig piece, running across between the frames. (These would have eliminated the need to cut all those tedious notches!) A spot of hot-melt glue at the corner between the spacer stick and the frame side will permit the upper jig frame from being removed and turned upside down on the jig base to permit free access to the bottom of the hull. (Providing you've located the threaded rods identically on each side of the jig as should be done.) The temporary longitudinal battens are removed as they are reached in the fairing process and then replaced, or not, as needs be, and similarly removed as the planking progresses, the planks replacing them and maintaining the frame's rigidity.

 

Once the frames are bound together in such fashion, sanding the frame bevels fair with sandpaper glued to a flexible batten is easily done, although the area obstructed by the top frame of the jig will be inaccessible. That can be left to be attended to after the planking below it is hung. Once that is accomplished, the hull can be removed from the jig entirely and should have no problem holding its shape and can be sanded and planking hung in that area as well. (Don't plank above the upper jig frame while the hull is in the jig frame. If your upper jig frame isn't made in two pieces separated on the centerline or you may not be able to remove the hull from the upper jig frame, of course.)

 

 

Edited by Bob Cleek

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You need quite some rigidity when sanding, to achieve it and prevent misalignment when humidity changes - you need temporary spacers between frames anyway. Hard to imagine how that can be done with a non-temporary joints. Replacing a frame or two is doable by just dissolving PVA as described above, but getting them all in and out?

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