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US Brig Oneida by rlb - The Lumberyard - (POF) 1:48 scale - 1809 Lake Ontario Warship

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March 5, 2010

 

The flashback is over--that's everything I've got from MSW 1.0, and we are back to real time with this post.   I've been picking away at the bulwark cleats, and will be gluing them in place, along with the rest of the carronade tackle eyebolts, soon.

 

 

Ron

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Thank you for continuing the posts, Ron. I have been following each instalment with great interest. Your fastidious attention to detail (well, you and others) really makes me think I should make more of an effort. I am learning a lot from you! I do have a few questions though. 

 

- in post #119, you show how you make the tiny eyebolts which attach on the outside of the ship (pic no. 5, 6, 7). Can you show a macro of one single eyebolt? I am curious how you made the hole in the eyebolt, and whether you can actually thread a rope through there. 

 

- what tool are you using to make the scarphing joints? That is beautiful, neat work. I am guessing that you own a scroll saw? 

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Hi Amfibius,

 

Here's a picture of the Niagara replica which shows what I was copying--

 

post-69-0-42253900-1362546204.jpg

 

 

The ringbolt that secures the carronade breeching rope on the inside, extends through the bulwark, and has this small plate and a wedgepin (which is marginally visible) to prevent it from pulling out when the carronade recoils.   I've read of people going to the trouble of making the tiny locking wedgepin!, but I haven't done that.

 

I hope this explanation helps.

 

 

I used a fine tooth small hand saw, and a file,  to make the scarph joints, and no, I do not own a scroll saw!

 

 

Ron

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Glad to see we're back up and current now. That's going to be a lot of work to get those bolts and plates made up and secured. It will look really nice once it's done though. Since you aren't using paint are you going to blacken that hardware? Also, that's a great picture of the Niagara. One thing pictures like this showcase is how smooth everything is to point that it almost looks like plastic instead of wood. 

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Thanks, Brian, Sinan, and Patrick! 

 

Just a few more words on those small plates--I only plan to do them for the breeching rope bolts, though the Niagara replica also has them for the outhaul tackle bolts.  And I'm cheating, my bolts don't go all the way through the bulwarks.  That would make them much, much harder to install!

 

The pieces are blackened, and we'll see them again when I glue the rest to the hull.  I'll try to take a close-up photo then.

 

Ron

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A small update:

 

About a 80 new ringbolts in the soup to be blackened--

 

post-69-0-36811700-1362623619_thumb.jpg

 

post-69-0-27302800-1362623620_thumb.jpg

 

post-69-0-09392700-1362623621_thumb.jpg

 

 

Drilling holes for pins to strengthen the cleat attachments--

 

post-69-0-12255200-1362623622_thumb.jpg

 

 

Eight large cleats, and about 16 small ones just about ready--

 

post-69-0-00537700-1362623623_thumb.jpg 

 

 

One thing I noticed in reposting all the old log photos--my green cutting mat has gone through some changes!!

 

 

Ron

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Thanks, Steven!

 

I was hoping to get at least a small update posted today.  The cleats are ready, but I've been poring over Chuck's Syren rigging plans (a similar brig), trying to wrap my head around all that needs to be prepared for the rigging--taking into account some differences between the two ships, and trying to make sure I know where to install everything that needs to be installed.   It's overwhelming!   I hope to have some progress to show this weekend.

 

Ron

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John,

 

Yes, all wood has been from the Lumberyard.   Most came along with the original purchase of the kit, but due to a few goof ups on my part, and some changes I wanted to make, I bought some extra billets of Swiss Pear.

 

Ron

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Thanks, Christian!    Yes, my thought from the start has been to rig her, but without sails.   It's a little foolish, though.  Just the hull I could find a place to display, but I don't think  have any where to put a rigged model of this size, especially considering the case it will need.  So we'll see. 

 

Ron

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Slow progress.

 

Here's a selection of pieces to be glued on: eybolts, eyebolts and eyebolts-with-rings for the transom gunports; some cleats for the running rigging-- 

 

post-69-0-28044900-1362870872.jpg

 

 

And here they are glued in--

 

post-69-0-10854500-1362870873.jpg

 

 

That double sheave piece poorly cut into the bulwark is bothering me.  It doesn't stand out so much in plain eyesight, but I think I'll try putting some sawdust paste in the gaps. 

 

 

Ron

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Ron,

 

If it's bothering you, then fix it - otherwise every time you look at the model all you'll see is that gap!

 

John

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I spent the day today re-making two chesstrees.

 

Here's the Chapelle drawing, and I based my first chesstree and it's location on this--

 

post-69-0-14874100-1362954666.jpg

 

 

However, it's location doesn't quite work because Chapelle's chainplates aren't long enough.  They don't include the topgallant and royal backstays.   Corrected chainplates will move the chesstree aft.

 

 

Since they had to be moved I removed the old chesstrees, and decided to remake them in a more typical shape.

 

Old one on the left, new one on the right--

 

post-69-0-41533500-1362954667.jpg

 

 

Here are the new chesstrees.  In the first picture the piece on the left is in it's rough, beginning form--

 

post-69-0-78911500-1362954668.jpg

 

post-69-0-58016000-1362954669.jpg

 

 

And here they are test fitted on the hull.  They need finish applied, and I'll wait and glue them on when I get to the chainplates themselves--

 

post-69-0-28055100-1362954670.jpg

 

 

Just forward of the new chesstree you can see the "scar" where the old one was removed--

 

post-69-0-79938800-1362954671.jpg

 

 

Ron

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I've just had an enjoyable time reading through your log Ron, don't know how I missed it first time around.

 

I like the way you have structured your log with clear photos and a lot of 'how to' content.

 

A fine looking model and I will continue to follow your build with much interest.

 

Regards,

 

B.E.

 

 

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Thanks, John!

 

Welcome aboard, B.E., and thank you for your kind words.

 

Ron

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Hello Ron

 

I've been a bit under the weather and so decided to spend some time looking at some build logs. Learning about building is an important step of the process. I've not been looking at logs out side of what I'm building too much since the crash as the pain of seeing so much gone is hard to take at times, even though I'm still really new to the hobby. MSW went down about 1 1/2 months after I discovered it. I know how it made me feel, and cant even image for the oldtimers, but I'm still daily amazed at how she bounced back.

 

That being said, praise be to Ilhan Gockay for preserving it and you for getting it back up and online. I am absolutely astounded by so many things. First by just the beauty of your work, second by the simplicity of how you work with simple methods and tools, third by your daring to tear back into her to fix problems (such as the stem/bulwark refit). I just spent the last 8 to 10 hours reading and viewing your revived log and all I can say is WOW.

 

Thanks you so much for sharing this again. You have taught me several things I've been wondering about, like stem/buwarks shaping and rudder hardware. I love your methods of showing the step by step with pictures which is so much a help no matter what ship one is building.

 

As I said to start learning about building is as an important step of the process as any and your build log is/was a fabulous work of learning.

Thank You and Thanks Ilhan.

 

Shine On -/\=

Keith

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Keith,

 

Thank you very much for your post. 

 

What a wide range of models, and methods, exists on MSW!  I know there is no possible way I could have built my model on my own, even with all the books that are available.  To see the photos in the variety of everyone's build logs, and to watch those models evolve before your eyes, is incredibly instructive, inspirational, and actually makes you think you can do it yourself!     

 

Shine on you crazy diamond!  I only had two PF albums--Dark Side of the Moon (of course), but I also had Meddle.

 

Ron 

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HI Ron

 

i truely enjoyed catching up with your build as the detailed explanation and pictures gives a good idea on how much time and work you have put into making sure everythings fits and it shows in your model which is really  beautiful :)

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Ron:

Nice work on the chesstree. It gives a good scale effect.

 

Russ

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Thanks, Russ.   The first version must have been a historically accurate variation--I'm sure Chapelle knew his stuff.  (Though who knows how correctly I interpreted his drawing.) 

 

I do prefer the look of the second version, for which I had more information (in Charles G. Davis) to work from.

 

Ron

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I'm jumping around a lot currently.  I have a back-log of things I want to work out.  With each little task, though they're not directly related or in order, I feel like I gain some knowledge that might help dissipate some of the "fog" that lays ahead, and make the way forward clearer.  That probably sounds overly dramatic, but I'm really slowly feeling my way at this point.   I'm pretty happy with how it's turning out! but there is trepidation.   Some of the things I've been concerned about for a long time.  Like the dead-eyes.  The fact that I didn't have an answer for them was weighing me down a bit.  

 

 

My problem was that, in seeing the web site photos from a lot of supply places, the holes aren't really in the right places on the dead-eyes.  They shouldn't really be an equilateral  triangle in the center, at least from what I've learned about a ship of my era.  But even if that was the desired location, the variation from piece to piece looked pretty bad.  On the other hand, I've seen fantastic examples on here of folks making their own with great results.   But they all have lathes, and precise equipment.  What to do?

 

Then, today, I saw Russ' post in his cross section log, and the light went on.  In making his dead-eyes he used a jig based on Underhill's, and though I own the book, I hadn't though to look at it.  I have now, and the technique is do-able.

 

I have a couple of pieces of old dowel in my wood supply, that I hadn't measured.  I'm not sure what kind of wood they are, but lo and behold they are the two sizes that I need for my dead-eyes.  The dowel for the larger size isn't perfectly round, so I'll have to figure out if I can deal with it, or whether I need to buy more.  But it's good enough to practice on.

 

First comes some brass fabrication: a ring of brass strip made to the size of the dead-eye.  And a brass "plate" with the guide holes for drilling the dead-eyes (for the plate I used some thin brass sheet that could be cut with regular scissors)--

 

post-69-0-24072900-1363225770.jpg

 

 

They need to then be soldered together--

 

post-69-0-09957100-1363225771.jpg 

 

 

My first attempt didn't quite make it.  The holes, though nicely symmetrical, were not close enough together.  I unsoldered the ring, and a process of slow refinement took place.  After six or so tries to get the right spacing, I settled on the piece on the far left--

 

post-69-0-81919000-1363225771.jpg

 

 

Soldering was tricky.  Due to my single overhead light and shadows, it was hard to tell if I was putting the ring precisely where it needed to be to put the holes in the right spot.  But this version looked good--

 

post-69-0-39318800-1363225772.jpg

 

 

The little jig is then simply placed over the end of the dowel, and the holes drilled--

 

post-69-0-08860200-1363225773.jpg

 

Then the dead-eye's contours are fine-tuned with a file, and it's cut off the end of the dowel.  The result was pretty good.  The spacing isn't perfect, but I think it's okay--

 

post-69-0-28512400-1363225774.jpg

 

post-69-0-98268200-1363225774.jpg

 

 

I learned a few things to improve as I go forward (like making sure the holes are drilled straight through--the back side of my test piece doesn't look as good as the front!), and I need to decide whether to use the dowels I have or maybe something better, but I'm just happy that this looks like it's going to work!

 

 

Ron     

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Ron:

The spacing looks pretty good in fact. I used wood for my jig because it was easier for me to assemble. However, your metal jig looks quite good. Works good too.

 

One thing though. You mentioned using dowels. I would urge you to rip up a stick of hardwood so that you know for sure where all the grain is going in the wood. Then turn or draw it down to the size you need. You can do that the same way you would shape a mast or yard, but if you have a machinist's screw gauge, that will work as a drawplate. I use mine quite a bit on large pieces. Not great, but it gets the job done. Or you could get some sheet metal and drill a few holes to make your own short term draw plate.

 

Russ

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