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US Brig Oneida by rlb - The Lumberyard - (POF) 1:48 scale - 1809 Lake Ontario Warship


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Thanks, Russ.

 

I have some pieces of square stock in cherry that I might be able to use.  Color-wise, the type of wood doesn't matter as I plan to paint or stain the dead-eyes black.   The square stock is pretty oversize (it's about 1/4 or 5/16"), especially for the smaller of the  dead-eyes I'll need.  But I don't need much.   About 8" of length will supply the 3/16" size dead-eyes, and I may need even less for the 1/8" size.  I don't have a way to rip wood, but for these pieces I think I can sand it down, and then I'll look at buying a screw gage to draw it round.  If none of that works, then I can go back to the dowels.

 

I'm happy with the jig.  I can experiment with cutting the blanks for the dead-eyes first and then drilling the holes--in which case I could use my rotary tool "drill-press"; or continue completely by hand a la Underhill.

 

Ron

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Ron,

 

Nice little jig there.  I like the approach, the soldered ring and drilled metal sheet, and the results look good to me.  Very nice.  I think hardwood is the way to go with the deadeye material - provides strength of breaking or tear-out in the small finished detail.

 

Very nice.

 

Elia

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I set about reducing a square cherry piece to a dowel for the larger dead-eyes.   The piece was a little over 1/4" square--9/32" to be exact.  I needed to get it down to 3/16".

 

This was done all by sandpaper.  First sanding it square down to just a hair over 3/16"--

 

post-69-0-39723800-1363315167.jpg

 

 

Then, sanding at a 45 degree angle on the 4 corners of the square, creating an octagon.  Then just twisting the piece in a loop of sandpaper until it was round.  I used 80 grit, then 160, and finally smoothed it a bit with 320--

 

post-69-0-22445700-1363315170.jpg 

 

post-69-0-96745600-1363315168.jpg

 

 

(The caliper in this picture was set to millimeters--it shows just under 5 mm)

 

 

Yes, it took a long time, but I was in no rush.

 

Then I used the jig, drilled the holes and roughed out a deadeye--

 

post-69-0-80523400-1363315170.jpg

 

post-69-0-56041200-1363315171.jpg

 

 

I'm not sure how thick to make the deadeyes.  I need to work with the shroud line, and chain links to determine this.

 

My short list of the next steps is--(1) finish my experimentation on how to make the deadeyes (I don't necessarily need to make them all yet, just settle in my mind how I'm going to do it).   (2) experiment with making belaying pins, (3) make the pinrails.

 

 

Ron

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Hey Ron,

More excellent work. As you were stating you needed to make deadeyes and didnt have a lathe I instantly thought of Russ crossection jig, then you beat me too it. I like the way you modified it to sit on the dowel with the metal ring.

Turning down that cherry to 5mm must of been relaxing, stuff like that I find like meditation. The cherry looks good also and its hard enough that it should hold up without getting dings like a softer basswood might. 

 

Keith

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Ron:

I used to be able to tell you right off the top of my head the thickness of the deadeye, but I cannot recall the source I read it in. However, I "think" (not to be trusted) the deadeye's thickness is half its diameter. Your deadeye jig should be that depth (whatever it is) so that you can cut the deadeye off in the jig and then pop it out afterwards. If someone knows for sure the relative thickness, please correct me here.  

 

Russ

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Thanks, Russ.  1/2 the diameter just happens to be about what the thickness of the jig is now--I can file the brass ring down if it needs to be thinner.  I'll have to do that when I make a jig for the smaller (1/8") deadeyes.

 

 

Keith and Patrick,  I take no credit for the jig.  It's directly from Harold Underhill's Plank on Frame Models v.1.  I need to remember to look there first when I'm not sure how to make something!

 

 

Ron

 

 

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When I saw your first attempt at cutting deadeyes using stock dowel I though, wow, what great work... But of coarse your work isn't good enough at "wow" you re-did said dowel in cherry and all I can say is that the test deadeye looks Fantastic!

 

Keep keeping the bar set so high.

 

Brian 

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hi Don,

 

I wish you good luck with your Oneida, and I hope your cateract surgery was sucessful. 

 

I don't think I needed to sand the keel or keelson narrower, they were pretty close to what it seemed they should be.

 

The frames are another story.  Taking off 1/16th (after assembling them) seems about right, but it might vary from kit to kit.  I just measured a few of my frames, and they measure .325 inches, which is about 15.6" in scale.  I'm not sure what they started out at.

 

Rubber cementing the frame drawings onto the frames couldn't hurt.  I think you will find that there will be excess wood on the frames, which will need to come off during fairing.  

 

I encourage you to start a build log!  It would be nice to see another Oneida taking shape.

 

Ron

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Don,

 

I am using regular Elmer's white glue, and have had no strength problems at any time.   As Titebond 2 has a distinct yellow color when dried, you might consider using their white/clear version, or Elmer's, just to avoid any visible patches of color.   Ideally, any dried glue on a visible surface would get sanded off, and nothing would ever show, but I wouldn't be comfortable taking that chance!

 

Ron

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Since the subject of glue has come up.

I've been using Elmers WoodGlue Max. its waterproof and stainable. Interior or exterior.

I made deck stringers by laminating cherry veneer to basswood and then let it cure a couple days. I then soaked the piece for 10-15 minutes for shaping. I was worried it would de-laminate. It held fine.

Tthis glue is a light brown color and dries clear. I really like it so far.

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Keith, that sounds like a pretty useful glue.

 

Don, I think this might be what I was suggesting--it's on Lowe's website, but I don't know if it's available locally for you.

 

post-69-0-03681000-1366833689.jpg

 

 

There's also a thread that was recently started here:   http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/1894-glue-recommendations/

 

That might give you more ideas.

 

Ron

 

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Hey Ron

I liked that it stated stainable, I always worry about the finishing process. Everything looks great then the glue interfers with the finish. We have yet to see if its stainable statement is true but it does become rather water tight/resistant, although I have tested a laminated piece and with long soaking it can be de-laminated. It held long enough for the deck stringer shaping, which I was worried it wouldn't.

 

Things arent always as advertised.

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Don, no problem with the questions.

 

I did not make any marks or guidelines on my building board.  The forward cant frames just about butt together where they meet the keel, and I transferred some marks from the plan set to the keel for the spacing of the aft cant frames.  There are some photos of this in my log on page 3, scroll way down to post #39.

 

I will echo to you some advice that Elia,(who also built an Oneida model) gave me.   He suggested making some kind of jig to get the bow shape correct.  I didn't make a good enough one, and had some problems.  I also suggest doing this for the stern, because mine turned out a little narrow.   A piece of wood cut to the correct hull shape, held vertically off of the building board at the bow and stern would be a good idea.  You can see examples of this on other logs--off the top of my head I don't remember which, but check out a bunch of the scratch build logs--you'll get the idea.

 

Ron

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  • 3 weeks later...

Don,

 

There was one frame, I do not recall which one, that was just as you described, and had to be trimmed short.  It confused me at first also.  Glad to hear you are making progress.

 

Thanks, Christian.

 

 

I have not been working very hard on my Oneida.  I have sporadically been working on turning out the belaying pins, and I do hope to have an update before too much longer.

 

 

Ron

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  • 1 month later...

Ron, I came across your build while doing some google searches for the Brig Niagara. Your build is well done and the model is well built, very professional and not a lot of use of fancy tools. kuddoes to Lunberyard!

 

I will definately come back to see the finished model

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  • 1 month later...

Hello Ron,

I received the kit from the Lumberyard for the Oneida, there were some parts missing in the box and the drawings are in black and white which make the identification of the parts difficult sometime ! I have seen that you have a drawing from Lachapelle, which seems much more detailled that the one they provide with the kit, could you tell me where you found those plans, and your model look terrific by the way !

Thank you in advance

NB I am new to this forum.

Philippe in Québec city

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Hi Philippe,

 

Thanks for the compliment, and I encourage you to start a build log for your Oneida.  It would be great to see it taking shape. 

 

The Chapelle plan (and also the sail plan) is available from the Smithsonian Institution, here:  http://americanhistory.si.edu/about/departments/work-and-industry/ship-plans

 

Regards,

Ron

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