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Proxxon compound table -- Opinions?


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I have been pleased with mine so far. The hand wheels are a little small and, as discussed elsewhere on the Forum, they would benefit from enlargement. I have not needed to do any adjusting yet but it looks likely to be a simple operation. For the price I would say it is a good bit of kit.

 

Mike.

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Ahoy Richard :D

 

I have found mine to be excellent for hobby use and of high quality. It is not however a Sherline table but it will interface perfectly with your drill and not break the bank. Accuracy is very good but not as precise as a higher end compound table. The comparable Sherline table is $260 and does not include the clamps, the Proxxon comes with them.

 

Mine was made in Japan. Not sure if that makes a difference

 

My only complaint would be that the wheels used to move the table should be knurled. Other then that I have no complaints and use it frequently. It makes a big difference when using micro drills or making custom parts. It should also open up some basic milling opportunities which you will find very useful for shipbuilding

Edited by JPett
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If you are talking about this: http://www.proxxon.com/en/micromot/27100.php

 

... then I would say I have mixed feelings about it. I'll just say that this compound table is the major reason I am thinking of selling my MF70 mill and upgrading to a Sherline. The chief complaint is the amount of backlash on this table, mine has about 0.5mm of backlash. Also, the table has a habit of rocking disconcertingly when you turn the handles. Both of these can be worked around, but I am not happy with it. 

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I have used mine a lot with my TMB 220 drill stand. I found it works well as long as adjusted and fitted correctly. Agree with Mike though, the adjustment wheels are a bit fiddly. I find that I have more problems, accuracy wise, with drill bits flexing than any play in the table itself.

Edited by hornet
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By making your last turns on the feed wheels in one direction will take up any slack on one side, it works with anything that is moved mechanically, without some slack, parts would not move as intended. Being consistant on how you take up that slack will increase precision.

jud.

Edited by jud
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The play in a mechanism is known as 'backlash'. You can read more about this at the Sherline website.

All parts of a movable mechanism need some clearance between other parts, so that the mechanism can be operated. And the price of a moveable mechanism is commensurate with the fineness of the clearances, i.e. a machine with little or no noticeable backlash will cost a lot more money than a crudely constructed copy.  But there are methods to compensate for a less than perfect mechanism.

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I've had no problem with the Proxxon table, which I've been using for several years. Yes, the hand wheels are a bit small in 'throw' and not the most comfortable such as on my watchmakers' cross-slide, but they are useable. I placed a dot of red paint on the '0' of the hand wheels and yellow at the '5', which makes life much easier when counting off turns and decimal fractions of a turn.

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I have the KT 150 (http://www.proxxon.com/en/catalogues/micromot/english/) to go with the BFB 2000 mill/drill stand. It seems  to be a well made and robust piece of kit. Apparently, the bit of backlash can be reduced by replacing the lead nuts with higher tolerance items. I've not had it that long but happy with it. It can also be converted to CNC if the funds allow.

 

Al

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I not only sell them but use them. I have had no problems with mine or heard any complaints from my customers. No it is not a Sherline, it would just amount to how close your tolerances would need to be. If machining or milling metals perhaps you could justify the cost differences to Sherline. I have had Sherline lathes and mills and they are great tools, but for most of the woodwork and light metal use the Proxxon tools are outstanding. Check my site as I offer the Proxxon line at very discounted prices. Thanks, and even though I sell these tools, I am not predjudiced to them, it becomes a matter of what fits your needs.

 

http://www.proxxontoolsdiscount.com

 

John

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