Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi Folks

 

First question:

Does anyone know about planking inside a ship, i.e. HMS Victory? Are the planks on the inner hull the same length as on the outer hull? What ist the planking scheme?

 

Second Question

What about the planks on the lower decks? Are are decks caulked? Or only the main deck? Caulking on lower decks seems a bit too much for me because there isn't much water to sip through?

 

Many Greetings and lots of sunshine from Germany

Thom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good questions, I have guesses but want to see what the true answers are.

 

I would imagine the inner hull planks would require a butt shift pattern similar to the outer hull, but the plank tapering would be different, they would probably be sized to fit in that particular decks space from deck to ceiling.

 

If I had to guess, I would say the lower decks are not caulked unless there is some sort of drainage system to allow water to make it all the way down to the bilge, where it can be pumped out.

 

Ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 'right answer' would take up several chapters of a book!

 

Probably the best short answer is to look a Ed T's build log of Naiad. You will see how complex this is. The only short answer is to the question of plank length. Standard lengths in the 18th century British yards were either 24' 0", 26' 0" or 28' 0". The butts were staggered or offset from the outside planking for maximum strength.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 'right answer' would take up several chapters of a book!

 

Probably the best short answer is to look a Ed T's build log of Naiad. You will see how complex this is. The only short answer is to the question of plank length. Standard lengths in the 18th century British yards were either 24' 0", 26' 0" or 28' 0". The butts were staggered or offset from the outside planking for maximum strength.

 

Hi

 

Yes, I think you're right, it seems to be very difficult. Most ship models are with a closed hull, and so there are not so much infos to be find in the forums. I think usind the "normal standard length" would be okay, and with the butt staggering you are right, it was with offset to the outer planking (sounds logical).

Okay okay, seems a bit overdosed for my Vic Cross Section Model with 9cm width, I won't do a butt shifting here. But with the build came the question (still sitting in the corner to build Jack Sparrow's Black Pearl with one open hull side).

 

Thanks for your answer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

the inner hull planks were all sorts of thickneses, and had spaces for air flow, and so on, like Druxey said a book's worth of info.  See 'The Contruction and fitting of the English Man of War: 1650-1850, by Peter Goodwon' for some details.  I think all decks are caulked with the exception of the ortholp(spelling?) deck.

Edited by BrianR
Link to comment
Share on other sites

the inner hull planks were all sorts of thickneses, and had spaces for air flow, and so on, like Druxey said a book's worth of info.  See 'Anatomy of Nelson's Ships' for some details.  I think all decks are caulked with the exception of the ortholp(spelling?) deck.

 

Yes, you're right. It's much more complicated than the outer hull. Interesting that deAgo on the Victory Cross Section Model cares for caulking only the upper decks, not the orlop deck, because of it's removable planks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Forgot which book I saw it, but the interior of the bulk heads had metal strips nailed to them running at or about a 45 degree angle in both directions. Apparently it added considerable strength to the hull. I would think it was also a lot more expensive then nailing wood.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...