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bigcreekdad

Scroll saw operation

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I'm cutting 3/16 apple for my Triton cross section build. I've got the blade pretty tight, but it seems to bend a bit as I'm pushing the wood through. Is this normal? Different blade? Too much effort on my part?

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If this works similar to a band saw, then the thicker the wood being cut - the fewer TIP the blade cutting it should have.  When the gullet of a tooth gets filled, it cannot cut anymore.

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Three teeth in the work at a time is a good rule of thumb. I suspect you are using too fine a blade and/or trying to feed too rapidly.

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I have an el cheapo Delta scroll saw that I have owned for almost 20 years and I get the same sort of outcome your experiencing basically blade deflection. You also have to be careful how tight you set your blade as well otherwise she'll snap! One thing I found which might help you is the use of the spiral blades you can buy. These blades allow tight turns and the trick is to go slow and not force it.

 

Another thing if you have the patience is to do the old "Woodright Trick" and make up a miniature coping saw that will take scroll saw blades. Sure it's not as fast but you get the real feel of the wood as you cut it.

 

The trick with any hand saw is let the blade do the work and never force it. I knew a carpenter who could cut 3/4" plywood with a hand saw better than any guy with a skill saw. I marveled at how he was so accurate. He said it's all in the wrist action, speed of stroke, know your wood, and of course a sharp saw. Try the spiral blades they work well!

Jeff

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I made a 'guide' for the blade as shown below. The table also has a thin sheet of plywood for an almost zero clearance blade path.

The first picture was my first try, the second is a wooden block bolted to the foot.

 

post-246-0-21971900-1424689076.jpg  post-246-0-30297300-1424689089.jpg

Edited by Modeler12

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Jaager, in order to use 'cool blocks' you still have to install the holder and make fine adjustments to make sure the cutting teeth don' touch the teeth. 

In my case it does not matter. If the teeth cut into the wooden block too much I can replace the block, but it does not damage the blade. 

 

In fact, for very small blades it almost becomes a fact B)

  

As far as 'cool' is concerned, for me it has not been a problem either. I don't use the saw that much, but if I were to go on and on, smoke will tell me when to stop (and put another blade and back stop in place).

 

To install this guide takes a bit of work. I ended up drilling and tapping two #4-40 threads into the foot and make the wooden block with a slot so I can adjust the for-aft position for the blade to clear. Once I was satisfied, I made several for easy replacements.

 

DiKri, the way I read this new forum you mentioned, it wants you to join and then pay for what ever info you want. Perhaps I am wrong about reading the first page. Do you suppose that my idea could be worth something with those members :rolleyes:

Edited by Modeler12

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If you'd rather have something in hand.... here's a good reference form ScrollSaw.   I have one and it's been a big help.

 

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/big-book-of-scroll-saw-woodworking-scroll-saw-woodworking-crafts-editors/1111756500?ean=9781565234260

 

There seems to be several versions but the only difference I can see is the cover as all of them are copyright 2009.

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Jay,

I was looking at your 2nd example and envisioning the top middle block as being an epoxyed Cool Block to reduce friction, instead of what looks like Ebony.  The color is close to Cool Block color. 

Edited by Jaager

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Jay,

I was looking at your 2nd example and envisioning the top middle block as being an epoxyed Cool Block to reduce friction, instead of what looks like Ebony.  The color is close to Cool Block color. 

What I did was to paint the block with some black spray paint. The first attempt worked fine (it was held in place with some double backed tape), but the color of the oak was distracting, so I 'blackened' it. The whole piece is oak.

 

PS. The whole idea was mine, No copy rights involved as far as I am concerned. I even have my little drawing of the block if anyone is interested to see that.

Edited by Modeler12

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DiKri, the way I read this new forum you mentioned, it wants you to join and then pay for what ever info you want. Perhaps I am wrong about reading the first page. Do you suppose that my idea could be worth something with those members :rolleyes:

 

As far as I can see, you can read most articles in this forum without having to register. And even registering is free and of course necessary if you want to post something. You only have to pay if you want a subscription to the magazine or other publications.

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As far as I can see, you can read most articles in this forum without having to register. And even registering is free and of course necessary if you want to post something. You only have to pay if you want a subscription to the magazine or other publications.

Sorry, my mistake. I must have read it wrong.

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Hey guys,

 

A scroll saw is just another saw, same rules apply. Blade selection all comes down to what material and how thick it is.

Druxey hit on the head, 3 teeth in the material is a good rule of thumb.

Also practice with speed of saw, speed of feed and blade type. Cutting basswood compared to boxwood is obviously a different thing.

Blade types like reverse, ultra-reverse, circular all give different results.

It's just practice guys, horses for courses.

Take the time to learn your equipment and how it performs under different conditions.

 

Ben

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