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Found 9 results

  1. Have you ever browsed through your favorite build to see what the full build looks like at the present time? Have you ever wondered what else is being built on MSW 2.0, it may be a kit, scratch, R/C, card or plastic, or any other material, including digital reconstruction. I am inviting all members to post a latest photo of their build (side elevation)and a link to that build, so everyone can see what it looks like, and give others an idea of what else is going on. I am not trying to create a multitude of build logs under one topic, just photo’s so we can all see what is going on. This will possibly help others in deciding on what to build next Anyone interested?
  2. Late summer 1805, the sun is burning inexorably from above, the wind is completely asleep, the sea is smooth as glass. The dispatches have already been exchanged. The master of the small cutter has just returned to his tiny vessel. Behind it there is towering the enormously massiv silhouette of the huge black and ocher striped three decker. Through the open gunports the lashed up guns can be seen. Also the officers' cabins ports are wide opened by the order of the Captain's to ensure an optimal ventilation of the hot and steamy lower decks. Clatter of activity on some guns being ran out cuts through the silence. The rumble of the heavy guns rolling over the decks and the trampling of countless bare feet and the short shouted commands supported by a multitude of hand signs originate from the ordered gundrill for new gun crews and their officers. In competition between the three decks they are fighting for the fastest rate of firing. The rest of the ships crew is occupied with cleaning and mending duties. The holystone are scratching on the decks. Above all the sails hang slack in their yards. No breath of wind moves them. They are nestled heavily over stays and fighting tops. The captain took advantage of the hot calm to put up all the canvas possible for airing. One of the studdingsails is taken in, the spar tied up with its inner end against the shrouds, in order to mend something on its fittings. Sitting on a swing seat pendent from the fore top, a crew member just is finishing painting over with ocher the originally black coloured mast loops. On the poop Captain Hardy monitors the young cadets´ training in navigation, supported by Lord Nelson, who uses the opportunity to entertain the cadets with stories of his actions and the ideas of his tactical concepts. But in the back of everybodys mind there is just one question - When will there be wind again ...
  3. Hello folks, google's cache still remembers my original HMS Fly log, so this is what I could scrape from it: After HMS Race Horse by Sergal I decided to get a bit more serious and build HMS Fly using the wonderful kit by Chris Watton. What I miss about kit presentations in general are detailed photos of their various parts, so I decided to make them.
  4. Having completed my first model ship (Airfix's HMS Victory) in 2013 I was eager to build a second, 74 gun ship as they were the mainstay of the Royal Navy. However it soon became apparent that none are available in the form of a plastic kit. But, after a bit of digging around i discovered that Heller do two versions of the French 74 gun ship, quite a few of which were captured in battle and re-commissioned into the Royal Navy. This meant i could build a British 74, but i would have to do quite a bit of kit bashing. Now all i had to do was decide what ship to base my model on. THE SHIP Launched at Rochefort on 29 April 1794 Lion was a 74-gun, third rate ship of the line -a member of the Téméraire class designed for the French Navy by Jacques-Noël Sané. In May 1795 the ship was renamed Formidable. Captained by Charles Alexandre Linois Formidable sailed as part of the fleet commanded by Admiral Villaret Joyeuse that fought against the British at the Battle of Groix on 3 June 1795. During the battle Formidable came under the sustained fire of two British ships. Her hull, masts, sails and rigging were badly cut up and a fire soon broke out on her poop. When her mizen mast fell over the side Linois finally hauled down his colours. Over 320 of his crew of 700 had either been killed or wounded in the action. Linois had lost an eye and all his lieutenants had been injured. The ship was taken to Portsmouth where Linois was exchanged. The Royal Navy already had a 90 gun second rate named Formidable and as it was mistakenly believed that the ship had been captured off Belle Ile, rather than the Ile de Groix, she was renamed Belleisle. In August 1798 Belleisle began fitting out at Portsmouth. Her hull was strengthened and much of her internal layout was altered to suit British tastes. The refit took fourteen months and cost £35842.0.0d (roughly two million pounds in todays money) In February 1803 she sailed for the Mediterranean, joining a fleet that would soon fall under the command of Admiral Horatio Nelson. Captained by William Hargood, (her longest serving captain) she was the second ship in the British lee column at Trafalgar, sailing into battle astern of Collingwood’s flag-ship Royal Sovereign. She soon lost all her masts, her bowsprit, her anchors, even her figurehead in her bruising encounter with Fougueux and eight other ships of the combined fleet. The only place left to raise her ensign was at the end of a pike which she managed to keep flying until the ships following behind her in the British line finally came to her rescue. By the end of the battle thirty-three of her people had been killed and a further ninety-four injured. The next day the battered British ships and their French and Spanish prizes were hit by a terrifying storm which did not let go for four whole days. Sails were shredded, fragile masts brought crashing down. When the storm hit Belleisle was under the tow of the frigate Naiad. The tow had broken and as desperate attempts were made to reconnect the line in the heaving swells the two ships crashed into one another, staving in Naiad’s stern. Moments later Naiad’s topsail ripped apart in the howling wind and had to be hacked free; then she lost one of her staysails. By the time Naiad’s sails had been sorted out Belleisle had disappeared from view in the heaving seas and driving rain. Left to fend for themselves Hargood now attempted to take his ship around Cape Trafalgar and into the Straits of Gibraltar under a hastily lashed together jury rig. Around midnight Hargood summoned his officers and told them the ship was about to be wrecked and that they should prepare for the worst. Belleisle’s people, cold and exhausted, waited through the night for the end, but thankfully it never came. By the next morning, using the smallest scrap of sail, they had managed to turn the ship away from the dangerous shore. Naiad returned and as the wind eased was finally able to get a line across to Belleisle and tow her into Gibraltar. Belleisle returned to Portsmouth for a refit which took four months and cost £16384.0.0d. In September 1806 she took part in the capture and destruction of a crippled French 74, Impetueux. After almost four years in command Hargood left the ship a year later. Belleisle was present at the capture of Martinique in January 1809 and later that year she took part in expeditions to the Scheldt and Walcheren. She was finally laid up in ordinary in September 1809. In July 1814 she began a large repair at Portsmouth but a month later the decision was taken to have her broken up instead. THE KIT Copyright Heller The donor kit for this conversion will be Heller’s Le Superbe (80895), a Téméraire class 74 launched in 1784 but wrecked in a storm eleven years later. Here are some sprue shots. These white sprues are the fixtures and fittings for Superbe. Heller's other 74, Glorieux, has a different set of sprues The sprues on the right are for the long guns and carriages. There are five of each provided in the kit The kit also comes with three sheets of vacuformed sails, a chain for the rudder and a rigging machine. No rigging thread though (any provided with the kit would probably have needed replacing anyway.) The instructions are all in French but a page of translations is provided. Parts are both numbered and given a description i.e. 77 bowsprit cap THE BUILD I started things off by sanding down the hull and decks which all have a quite pronounced wood grain effect. I then attached the parts containing the hawse holes to the hull, filling and sanding the gap. As you can see the copper plates continue up to the lower wale rather than finishing at the waterline. This will need to be sorted out. Another area requiring attention are the rather poorly moulded gratings. These need tackling anyway as British and French 74's had different deck layouts.
  5. Hi Everybody, I started building HMS Victory from the DeAgostini wood build kit supplied in Europe (UK). I have been collecting the magazine issues since Q3 2010, but I only started the build on 31/12/2012, it's my project for 2013 I'll add some pictures below now, to show you my progress so far ... some eight weeks into the project. You can find a much more complete set of pictures of this build on Facebook ... over 830 so far and counting ... find them on the link at the end of this post. I have commentary with every picture in my HMS Victory Model Build set. I have built many kit models in the past, but they have all been plastic kits - this HMS Victory build is my very first attempt at a wooden model. I do not have a workshop or studio to work from, so this model is being built in my sitting room. I'm having great fun doing it, I hope you all get some enjoyment as well, feel free to critique/comment. The complete collection with step-by-step commentary can be found on my Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151291206524651.493159.637009650&type=1&l=6948343979 I will continue to add pictures to both the gallery here, and my Facebook. Thanks for reading
  6. Hello All, I was going to start this build about a year ago, after some very helpful advice from members of this forum I managed to narrow the choice of my first build down to either HM Yacht Chathem or HMS Cutter Sherboure. However, shortly after that post my circumstances changed and was not able to start. But now I have decided, for many various reasons, to buy the Sherbourene, I like the fact that it spent most of its time in service around my home city of Plymouth. nevertheless it was a difficult choice between two magnificent vessels. So I decided to create a new account as I cant remember my old one ,and am now eagerly awaiting the arrival of my kit . Thanks to though who offered there advise last year on that thread, Cheers, R5
  7. Another open question from the old forum. Set aside the discussion, when there could have been a side entry port on special british three deckers, if there was one, how was it closed?!? Having looked at this question already for quite a while, looking at plans at NMM and plenty of contemporary models, still saw no answer. Always the door is completely open, even if the port lids beside are closed. So I took the time and collected all the possible versions, that came so far into discussion. Does anybody have a clue? See the attached file, my personal favorite is no 6., as this is the way the side pocket entrances were closed. Also interesting no 9. as it would go with the small cabins that existed in the 1700 in between the guns when the port was introduced. The drawing shows a minimised version. Any opinions or even better hard facts? Best regards, Daniel Seitenpforte v5 en.pdf
  8. Hi Folks, after 9 months I´m back at service and I open my Shipyard again........ I had some health problems but everything is good and I want to show you my new project.....! The HMS Victory Cross-Section, it shows you the part from the mainmast. I change some things as in the kit. At first I use pearwood 2x5mm and inside 1,5x4mm stripes and second I build light inside the ship. But look, here are the first pictures:
  9. for anyone intrested http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-22461376