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Jaager

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  1. Jaager's post in What Glue is Best for Rigging Ropes? was marked as the answer   
    What PietFriet said, but it should probably be bookbinders pH neutral version of PVA.  It is white, dries clear, and does not potentially degrade natural fibers that are vulnerable to acid.  
  2. Jaager's post in Sycamore wood harvested – best way to proceed? was marked as the answer   
    If the terminology follows tradition, you have a species of Maple there.  It is close enough to Hard Maple for the differences to be academic.  It is also a local commercial hardwood for you.
    Harvesting, seasoning, and milling your own wood is tricky to do and a lot of work if it is not a part of your usual work.  The rewards generally match the necessary investment in time, equipment, and skills if the species harvested are those which are not to be had by any other means.  This would most often be a fruitwood, box, if lucky, hawthorn, Cornus and the like.
     
    That editorial caveat out of the way, It needs air circulation to dry before a fungus gets it.  It needs protection from rain and snow. It needs protection from borrowing insects.  The rate of water loss from various surfaces needs attention.  The wet finger rule is seasoning requires 1 year per inch of thickness.
     
    The water will leave much more quickly from areas of open end grain: cut ends and where branches are cut off.  Left uncontrolled, the difference in rate of water loss will produce internal stresses. 
    The wood will split and check.  In the worst cases, the result is toothpicks.  The open ends must be sealed. This needs to be done concurrent with harvest or soon after.   There are many materials that do this, but quick and dirty is a THICK coating of leftover latex house paint.  Recoat as any splitting there shows there is not enough of a barrier.
     
    Bark slows the rate of water loss from the side grain and there also may be eggs or larvae of wood eating insects in it back from when it was standing.  Leaving the bark on invites insect damage, a slower rate of drying, and not discovering any existing rot, which would result in a wasted effort.
    Air circulation around each piece is important.  Pieces of wood are generally used for this.  Over here, these are called stickers.  The process of stacking the drying wood using the stickers is termed "stickering".
     
    It speeds drying time, making handling easier, and may save on loss to splitting if the logs are immediately reduced to billets.  One inch thick is OK if you do not need stock for larger scale POF frame stock.  Two inch is better if you do need this.  Getting logs into billets is most efficiently done using a band saw.  It is a royal PITA otherwise and generally involves serious loss to kerf.
     
    Length,  from the lumber yard, the boards generally come in 8 foot lengths.  My first outing involved the yard bisecting to 4 foot.  This is still impractical. For a while, I cut them into 16" lengths for my bench.  It is a bit fiddly and short, and now I find 2 foot lengths to be my sweet spot.
     
    Does your garage have rafters/ trusses?   Is there room there for drying wood?  Is there an attic in your home?  Otherwise, your outside stack will need a blue tarp and probably a new one every 6-12 months.
  3. Jaager's post in Thickness Sander questions was marked as the answer   
    1700 rpm is about the max  for any of this sort of sanding machine.  I have not done the experiment, but I suspect that  mush faster will produce a well charred surface.
    If the rotation is in the direction of the feed, you will have an electric motor driven version of a medieval or Roman era projectile throwing weapon war machine.
    Even at your slower 4500 rpm, any stock will probably deeply penetrate drywall.  Mere human flesh would not stand a chance.
     
    I suggest dropping back 10 yards and buying a Byrnes Sander.  I have experience with making my own - from way before there was any commercial machine - and the ease of use and precision with the Byrnes makes any homemade machine an exercise in pointless frustration. 
  4. Jaager's post in Thickness Sander questions was marked as the answer   
    1700 rpm is about the max  for any of this sort of sanding machine.  I have not done the experiment, but I suspect that  mush faster will produce a well charred surface.
    If the rotation is in the direction of the feed, you will have an electric motor driven version of a medieval or Roman era projectile throwing weapon war machine.
    Even at your slower 4500 rpm, any stock will probably deeply penetrate drywall.  Mere human flesh would not stand a chance.
     
    I suggest dropping back 10 yards and buying a Byrnes Sander.  I have experience with making my own - from way before there was any commercial machine - and the ease of use and precision with the Byrnes makes any homemade machine an exercise in pointless frustration. 
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