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HELP with Treenailing and Sweep Ports - Opinions and Advice requested: HMS Granado Bomb Vessel - Caldercraft 1:64


HardeeHarHar

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I have completed the 2nd planking on the HMS Granado hull with Boxwood and a dark walnut wale (please see build log pictures), and have reached a point of no return with regard to treenailing the deck and/or hull and drilling out the sweep ports (egad).  Its a little further complicated by the fact that this is only my 2nd build, and I am already considering leaving the hull unpainted to show the nice boxwood/walnut contrast.  Opinions and comments on this move would be most appreciated.  Then, treenailing the hull would be required (I would probably try and use a 0.3 mm hand bit and a syringe needle to start the hole), and that is a considerable undertaking that if done poorly could make the model look too busy.  Yes?  Again, opinions and suggestions appreciated.  Treenailing just the deck might be a little easier in scope?  Finally, the sweep ports look awesome when done right.  Given my skills and where I am in the build log, what is the general consensus on the value of cutting them, or heaven forbid, just putting the lids on hull and faking it.  Ugh, so many questions, and thats why I am asking for help.... Need more context?  Consider this:   If I go and treenail the hell out of the hull, and it looks bad then that sucks.  Or it could look great, but then as a newbie, I could screw the model up later in the rigging or doing something stupid and have it all end up in the trash.  

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I don't know, what the "general consensus" is on the treenail topic, so I will post my own opinion here.

It all depends on the scale of your model - the smaller the model, the smaller and less visible the treenails should be. Perhaps no treenails at all, since they were practically invisible from ~15, 20 ft. on a full size ship. Calculate, what 15 feet would be in your scale and try to reproduce the same on your model.

If your model is in the scale 1:64 and you want to show them, but at the same time you are concerned about overdoing it (don't want your model to look like it has measles), you can do it, using the same wood you used for planking (boxwood). End on, it will be a bit darker than your planks, especially after you oil it. You can entertain the idea of cutting your treenails with a special treenail cutter from Vanda Lay Ind.  here:    https://www.vanda-layindustries.com/html/treenail_maker.html   I have this gadget for many years - it works well with many species of hardwood, will work with boxwood as well, but not so well with bamboo (too fibrotic for this cutter). If you want to use bamboo skewers, go with Jim Byrnes draw plate (he is a member here). The process of drawing treenails from bamboo through his plate is a bit tedious and bamboo tends to break while you push it through, so go easy - after a few trials you'll figure out the mechanics, pulling steady, no yanking, just steady pull, gently grasping the skewer with tongs or pliers. Andrew Kudin is showing it here:   https://modelshipworld.com/topic/20825-le-fleuron-1729-by-kudin-148-scale-kudin-andrey-youtube/page/5/?tab=comments#comment-753014

 

If that scares you too much, I would recommend just marking your treenails with a cut off sharp end of your medical needle. with a gentle circular motion. Just enough to make a mark of a tiny circle - after you oil the hull, those circles will be a bit more accentuated, just enough to show them. You don't want to show them too much, or make them too large, so figure out before how big they shoul be in your scale.

If you are the beginner, I would in fact recommend you to do just this. Less work, less chances to mess it up, and the end result may be the best.

Happy modeling!

 

Thomas

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25 minutes ago, Dziadeczek said:

I don't know, what the "general consensus" is on the treenail topic, so I will post my own opinion here.

It all depends on the scale of your model - the smaller the model, the smaller and less visible the treenails should be. Perhaps no treenails at all, since they were practically invisible from ~15, 20 ft. on a full size ship. Calculate, what 15 feet would be in your scale and try to reproduce the same on your model.

If your model is in the scale 1:64 and you want to show them, but at the same time you are concerned about overdoing it (don't want your model to look like it has measles), you can do it, using the same wood you used for planking (boxwood). End on, it will be a bit darker than your planks, especially after you oil it. You can entertain the idea of cutting your treenails with a special treenail cutter from Vanda Lay Ind.  here:    https://www.vanda-layindustries.com/html/treenail_maker.html   I have this gadget for many years - it works well with many species of hardwood, will work with boxwood as well, but not so well with bamboo (too fibrotic for this cutter). If you want to use bamboo skewers, go with Jim Byrnes draw plate (he is a member here). The process of drawing treenails from bamboo through his plate is a bit tedious and bamboo tends to break while you push it through, so go easy - after a few trials you'll figure out the mechanics, pulling steady, no yanking, just steady pull grasping the skewer with tongs or pliers.

If that scares you too much, I would recommend just marking your treenails with a cut off sharp end of your medical needle. with a gentle circular motion. Just enough to make a mark of a tiny circle - after you oil the hull, those circles will be a bit more accentuated, just enough to show them. You don't want to show them too much, or make them too large, so figure out before how big they shoul be in your scale.

If you are the beginner, I would in fact recommend you to do just this. Less work, less chances to mess it up, and the end result may be the best.

Happy modeling!

 

Thomas

YAY, thanks so much for your advice and opinon.  I like the needle idea to just make the ring.  I will also check out those treenail makers.  I really appreciate this feedback and opinion, as I am definitely a beginner and can add more details and use more skills as I build more models, but want to get the best out of the effort as well.  THANKS AGAIN.

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