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mtaylor

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Everything posted by mtaylor

  1. Well, if they can make it out scrap or sawdust, than it's actually a renewable resource. The question I have is what's created and needs disposal when they make these panels.
  2. I'm now thinking something to ford a stream or a moat. I don't think would have been effective being used as shields against firearms which was tried around that same time. I'll have to find the link.....
  3. The P-82 had some roots in the P-38. As kid, a buddy and I took 2 P-38's and started modifying them. A neighbor set us straight so we bought 2 P-51's. and actually had a model of the P-82. I know where I get my kit bashing from that turned into scratch building. LOL....... P-82 article: https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/f-82-twin-mustang-crazy-jet-fighter-you-never-heard-184389
  4. Wives are like that. They're used to the whole house being "their space" and you're just the guy who hangs out evenings and weekends and does the yard work, repairs.
  5. While not available yet, they're working on production, etc. Might be an interesting thing for models... ships, trains, planes, and buildings. https://phys.org/news/2016-03-wood-windows-swedes-transparent-material.html
  6. No other place to put this but it seems appropriate to post it as "Not ordinary news". https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-56978344
  7. And here I thought a Phillip's screwdriver was vodka, orange juice and Phillip's Milk of Magnesia.
  8. Good choice on the model I think and beautiful work on all of them. Welcome to MSW.
  9. The base is perfect, Eric. It really fits the mood and character of the model.
  10. All add..... mills are nice and pricey. However, much work can be down with a dremel type and few hand tools like files and sandpaper that mills and even lathes are used for. There's several topics on using a dremel type as a lathe. I have a lathe, not used it much except to turn some cannon and masts. Tasks I found could be done using the Dremel tools. The mill I have, is being patient with me as use if more than the lathe but not nearly as much as my small table or my jig saw. Those last two, I'd highly recommend. I'd say take a look at what you're building and what tool
  11. Welcome to MSW, Jim and thank you for your service. Do give some thought to a build log for your Pride of Baltimore. It's a great way to meet other modelers and also get help.
  12. Try what Dziadeczek suggests. If that doesn't work, there's always paint. I do a pickling step using vinegar, rinse, clean with acetone, then blacken. I also do it off ship as at times, I'm a bit messy. .
  13. I'll add this link to what Roger said... a good starting point is here: https://modelshipworld.com/forum/16-masting-rigging-and-sails/
  14. I did the color darkroom for several years as I did track side drag race photos of the cars for everything from handouts to huge photos for framing such as over a fireplace. A big PITA but really didn't have alternatives as the commerical processers priced everything out of the range of what my customers would pay. Even still.. made a great second income and made a lot of friends. Even the pros would have me do some shots for them. Take pictures on Friday night, proofs for Saturday, and final print ready for them on Sunday. Now, I'm pretty happy with digital all things cons
  15. The scale in the title is 1:48. From the dimensions on the ANCRE site.... 110 cm (43 inches) long.
  16. I don't see why not. Many of the builders doing POB scratch and kits do that. I'm doing on my Belle Poule even.
  17. That is classic government/engineering speak, Egilman. I swear I've sat through his meetings in the distant past.
  18. Indeed they are. It always amazed when I think about it... the rotors barely support their own weight. They sag. Yet, they lift the weight of a full loaded helicopter. Yes, centrifugal force but still..... I have to wonder what the first test pilot thought after walking around, preflighting it and moving those blades and watching them bend.
  19. Gary, those of us who flew in them or maintained them felt much the same way. We also called them "thousands of parts flying loose formation".
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