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Rigging yards with no sails - question


heksanol
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Hey Gif_Hasie, I think you just whip the blocks and let them hang in the correct locations with no lines going down at all.  This is what I did on my bounty launch since I didn't rig in the sails.

 

From what I see in the pictures it looks like if there were a sail in place then you would use a line to connect from the top block down to the block down on the sail edge.  Since you aren't doing sails those lines wouldn't exist, therefore the block would just dangling in the wind.

 

If anyone really knows the answer please correct me.

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Line number 105 is a bunt line (or possibly a slab line from the way it passes under the sail).  If no sail is rigged you can omit this altogether or you can do as suggested above and attach the block to the yard in the proper location and just let it hang there.

 

Line 106 is a clew line.  Missing from your diagram is the sheet line that would come down from the lower corners of the sail (the clew) and run through blocks or sheaves in the yard below the sail.  This is the key to what to do with the line if there is no sail rigged.  If there is no sail the sheet will be attached to the lower clew block and you can haul it up close under the upper clew block.  Or you could just omit line 106 and treat the upper block the same as for line 105

 

Regards,

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Hi Gif_Haise.  I have just had the same issue in my Endeavour build.  I rigged the blocks in-situ and intended leaving them unrove as suggested above.  However, when I posted my progress photos there were several queries (some p via PM) as to whether I was going to rig the clew, leech and buntlines.  After a little bit of research I determined there are two schools of thought on the matter - with and without lines (obvious ;))  It was pointed out that most of the contemporary models of the period showed the lines fitted with them rove through the blocks with a small overhand knot stopping it from pulling through the block.  I have used this approach leaving about 25mm of scale rope dangling.  In real life i believe they would have fitted/rove a spike/toggle through the line to prevent the line pulling through when the sails were unbent.  I will be posting some photos in my HM Bark Endeavour build log (Kits) of the finished lines later today/early tomorrow if you are interested in seeing what it looks like to assist your decision process.

 

Your choice though.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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In my opinion, if you don't rig the sails don't worry about those blocks and lines that serve only the sail. Namely the sheet lines are gone and so are the leech and reefing lines. Those are now just funny names.

 

However, what is important are the halyards (103) which raises and lowers the spar, the lifts (104) which control the position of the spars up and down as well as the braces (not shown) which position the spars fore and aft.
I would add the blocks for 105 and 106 as discussed above, but let them dangle in the breeze. In other words, add the block tied to the spar but don't include a line going through it.

BTW learning some of the terminology will help later on during your build. Hence the bold words.

Edited by Modeler12
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Thank you all very much for the info! :)

 

I think for now I will just leave the blocks that serves the sails hanging on the yard.

 

Banyan - I will have a look at your pictures - thanks.

 

popeye2sea - is this what you meant as shown in the picture below?

 

Regards

post-24596-0-96562500-1475049501_thumb.jpg

Edited by Gif_Hasie
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popeye2sea - is this what you meant as shown in the picture below?

 

Regards

 

In your last picture, line #101 is the sheet.  Do you see how it attaches to the lower corner of the sail at the same place as the lower clew line block from the first post (line # 106)?  If you have no sail set these two lines would stay together so that when the sail gets bent on they can be re-attached to the clew of the sail.

 

The other line (#97) is a lift line and functions to position the yardarms vertically.

 

On the lower yard from outboard in are a leech line, then two bunt lines, a clew line, and then the block for the sheet. 

 

Hope that helps.

 

Regards,

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