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amateur

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  1. Sorry, the guy doesn't give a reference. http://www.die-kartonmodellbauer.de/index.php?thread/10799-messerschmitt-bf-110-4-r8-1-33-halinski/&pageNo=3 at the end of the page. He is a rather good builder: don't know how he does it: no sloppy sides, no fibers at the edges, no glue where it does not belong, just perfect.... (and the partsize of those halinski kits is mind blowing) Jan
  2. Bit late, but I have seen some builders on a german forum to use double sided tape. Glue th thing to the inside of the canopy, cut the windows, and next peel the protection layer. Bit fiddly, but it seems to work. And yes, I will check whether or not I can fins a refer nce for the double sided Jan
  3. Quite a large part of this navy-collection of the Rijksmuseum is from collection of the department of the navy. That collection consists for a large part on demonstration-models, quirky designs and other experimantal stuff. Some of which made it to real life, many of which never got beyond the demonstration model. Jan
  4. My guess is a german produced decorator model from the first quuarter of the century. Somewhere around 1925. going by the sails and the ‘dragon’ I guess it was sold under the name ‘Santa Maria’ Jan
  5. Actually, the deck-lay-out has very much resemblance to the schooner Hannah, as drawn by Harold Hahn. In that lay-out, the foremost deck-hole, is not a cargo-hatch, but a sky-light. The windlass is just in front of that, behind the fore mast. Again, that points in the direction of a slightly out of scale windlass, and not of something else. Jan
  6. But, without knowing the onformation the builder used, one of the options could still be ‘windlass, build after a bad quality drawing’….. Given the fact that there is no other anchor handling gear, I tend to that option. Jan
  7. The Dutch military Museum also has this one in their collection: https://collectie.nmm.nl/nl/collectie/detail/263253/ it was a design by a rather famous Dutch admiral, Van Kinsbergen. the NMM has no documentation either. Can't see which problem is tackled by this design.... (actually, I can think of a number of new problems attached to this one, pusing this thing with a full sized gun barrel is rather cumbersome, I think) Jan
  8. Be welcome! We are looking forward to your build log. (And always happy sharing knowledge and tricks) Jan
  9. Please, do not use links, or desktop-copies to include pics, but the 'add files' feature of the forum. That is the way to make sureeveryone can see the pics. Jan
  10. I still am not sure whether I like the scalpels: the scalpels tend to flex, while the x-acto blades are quite inflexible. Is a matter of taste, I guess. Swann is redicously sharp. Jan
  11. My cat wasn't interested: they don't move and they don't make noise. As far as my cat is concerned, they are very much like shipmodels. Jan
  12. There are some very realistic bird models around. My favorite are the birds by johan Scherft, a dutch paper artist. They are incredibly good, and yet very simple to build (much smaller than that impressive eagle shown above ) and they cost (next to) nothing.
  13. Hi Martijn, welcome to MSW. Anything you want to know on shipmodels is here on the forum (somewhere ) Any chance of pictures of your builds? Jan
  14. I guess he means that the ringbolts you have made so far have an eye with an inner diameter that is larger than the thickness of the ring that will go into it. I.e. you need a far smaller drill size for your ringbolts. But: using a far smaller drill will result in a ringbolt of which the twisted end is actual thicker (or nearly as thick) as the outer diameter of the ringbolt, thus looking a bit clumsy and out of scale. As far as I read his comment: his suggestion is to make ringbolts like the originals: single wire, and an eye bent into the end. btw: I don't comment or react to your posts, but I am a regular reader of your story. Interesting stuff to read, and a breathtaking model! Jan
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