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Cheers,

I'm Just returning to modelling after several years off.

I am 'forced' due to age, etc. to no longer build POF in wood so I am going 'Virtual'.

My model will start with scantlings taken from historical references and finish with a walk-thru 3-D model.

I'm looking at a working class boat 1700's era. Now looking at a collier.

Any reference recommendations as to using blender in this type of environment?

Should I develop my lines in cad (frames etc) or do it all in blender?

Should be a multi year project. I love the research necessary.

I've looked at several posts and this seems to be the most active forum around - great members.

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Hi, I am confused with some terms as " walk-thru 3-D model " and "blender". Could you explain what you mean?

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Blender is an open source 3d model engine.

 

If a 3d model engine then the POV can move through the project hence 'walk-thru'

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No problem-

If you are a 1"tall person and someone placed you in a completely finished POF model, you could 'walk-thru' it. I want to the same in a 3d ,model. Have the camera location move through the completed virtual model.

My bad - re blender - should have been capitalized. It is a graphics package similar to Cinema4D or any of the others, but Free.

Ed

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I see. Thanks. I am only familiar with 3D modelling software as Solid Works, Inventor and Catia. For solid works I have a hands on knowledge of. Use it constantly at work.

Edited by Y.T.

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Ed,

Before I left 3DCG and returned to wood, I had Blender on my look into list, being free.  It has polygon and NURBS modelers.  I do not see any purpose in adding a program like CAD into your process.  I suspect that CAD has a steeper learning curve for modeling.  I am betting that any additional precision that CAD offers will be lost when translated into something that Blender uses.   The rendering and lighting will be a whole nuther thing.  I suspect that actual physical modeling may be a faster process, especially if a wood model does not involve the hidden innards. 

 

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Jaager;

Some good ideas. The virtual model will have all the frames and their various joints and I was thinking that doing the parts in CAD and then having them as a 'stack' of parts in blender, then showing how they went together. I did all my drawings for a 1:24 Morgan in TurboCad, then made individual patterns for each futtock for cutting and installation. I was thinking of doing the same, except importing the parts into Blender for rendering and assembly.

I think I'm going to spend some time with Turbocad and look at what it can do for high quality rendering and developing a walk thru.

Ed

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