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Simulating weathered copper- verdigris


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Pleased you liked it 1492, that of course was a painted finish, the procedure for giving a patination to actual copper plates is different, and not that easy to achieve to get that even soft green verdigris finish you see on Copper domes. etc,

 

C.N. Longridge  tried on his  model of Victory without much success. That effect would only really materialise with the hull out of water and on my particular model I was using a little artistic licence, but I do like the effect.

 

What model are you building, let me know and I can a let you know my approach to different  mediums.

 

B.E.

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I acheived something of a verdigris patina on the coppered hull of my (as yet unfinished :blush: ) Phantom.The technique is from Doanald McNarry's Shipbuilding in Miniature:

"Alternate applications of sal ammoniac solution and sea water are made in the same manner (i.e. with a piece of chamois held with tweezers-- Mike) until the hull takes the mottled green look required and then the whole of the coppering is given a coat of clear satin-finish . . .

 

Sal ammoniac is ammonium chloride, NH4Cl, and I simulated sea water with sea salt dissolved in distilled water. It's a slow process, but looks good when complete.

post-36-0-35217700-1361244487_thumb.png

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Blue Ensign,

 

Thanks for the information, I'm building AL Swift at the moment, I would like to use this on the rudder hinges and some other small pieces. Eventually I want to build a coppered hull and weather the entre ship including this effect below the waterline. 

 

Mike,

 

That is really is a nice natural effect on your copper. When you say it's a slow process do you mean slow for the effect to appear or the amount of coats required to reach this stage?

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Mike,

That is really is a nice natural effect on your copper. When you say

it's a slow process do you mean slow for the effect to appear or the

amount of coats required to reach this stage?

 

It takes quite a few applications to build up an even patina, and one must wait for each application to dry, as well.

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Hey John,

 

you can try a mixture of normal salt and white vinegar (+water) on your copper. The patination process will start within a few hours. Depending on the solution ratio Vinegar/water you will get different strong effects on the green patina that builds up. Other than that you only need Oxygene.

Depending on the copper u used u have to consider, that esp. copper foils often come coated when bought. Before treating them with chemicals its recommended to sand them to get rid of the coating. In my experience its not recommended to paint or spray the copper after the patination process with clear paint because the copper turns very dark and looks nearly black then. If the green patina gets too much its always possible to wipe it off with a wet sheet.

Harry

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