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Benjamin Latham by Brian Parsons - Model Shipways - 1:48 Scale

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Hi all!

 

So I have just completed the hardest part on my build. Which was waiting for Fedex to show up with my package.  :P

Now I have a basic question already. I have Gorilla glue and Elmer's wood glue. Are these ok to use or should i get something else? Well off to finish unboxing and inspecting parts. More to come soon.

 

 

 

 

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I always use Elmer's yellow carpenter's glue. The Elmer's wood glue will be fine.

 

Russ

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I've used yellow wood glue (Titebond 2) and Weldbond along with CCA.

 

The only issue with yellow wood glue I had was.... wait for it... it's yellow.  Sometimes on a messy application it shows.  The Weldbond dries clear.

 

I've never used Gorilla Glue except for the original messy foaming formula, so I can't comment

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Great, thank you. So far I'm building this piece of garbage Fair-A-Frame with 3 versions of revised instructions. Which is really wonderful since none of the measurements are correct anyway. I've read here that there are better options to use, so i think i'm just building it because it's here. 

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The Fair a Frame is indeed a waste of time. But, if you are having fun with it....

 

Seriously, there are plenty better ways to get your frames in straight and true. I use a steel machinist's square made for model work.

 

Russ

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So I'm not really sure why they made this false keel four pieces. The two identical pieces for the front, then the same for the back sandwiched together, then join the front and back. However there it is and it's drying. Reading through the instructions for the next step, it says to cut the rabbet and the bearding line. I am curious if that it a good idea or not. I've seen a few posts that talk about adding a piece of scrap because they cut to much? Any advise would be great. 

 

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My 2 cents:

Cutting the rabbit is a bit tedious, but if you are careful not too hard to do.  I built two models without cutting one (instructions didn't call for one and I didn't know how hard or easy it would be) and one with.  It is easy to "over-cut" so you need to be careful.  When you do over cut you may have to remove and replace some wood with scrap.  I over cut a bit on one and it worked out fine without doing anything.

 

When you don't cut the rabbit you can  make a joint that looks good, but it is more difficult.  When you cut the rabbit the joint nearly makes itself.

 

My advice: Cut the rabbit. 

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I have never seen a model with that sort of profile former. Are you sure that they meant for you to sandwich the pieces together like that? I would have thought that you would have two pieces, front and back. It almost sounds like you got two profile formers in your kit. I do not know why they would have done that.

 

However, if the instructions specifically mention the sandwiched pieces, then it must be so.

 

Russ

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Brian,

 

I've just caught up with your Ben Latham build. Looks like a good start you got going. I look forward to seeing the hull develop.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

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Curiosity killed the PopJack.  I couldn't help myself, I checked the parts list for you on this ship.  It reads (in part):

 

 

"The center keel, keel, stem, sternpost, and rudder each are supplied in two 1/8” thick pieces. Glue

these together to form the required 1/4” thickness."
 
So, I guess you are good!
 
(But now that I've done that, I realize how easy it is for anyone to check and see that I don't always follow directions!)

 

Can't wait to watch the build.  The ship is a great one to model.

Edited by PopJack

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Brian-

 

Welcome to the newly forming fleet of Benjamin Latham builds! :dancetl6:

 

Looking good so far!  I am also building the B.L. and am only a few steps ahead of you, hopefully starting planking the hull tonight. 

 

Yes the false keel is in four pieces, the only thing that I came up with for a reason to do it this way is that this way it is easer to get a straight hull by clamping it to a flat surface while gluing.  But I may be way off, who knows :P

 

Check out my build thread in my signature and I will check here often as well and we can bounce ideas and questions off one another.  I think this is going to be a fun ship to build.

 

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A bit more progress today. I did the rabbet and bearding line, not sure if it's correct really but I think it's pretty close.  I did some shaping on the keel stem and rudder. Then installed the stem. After it dried I noticed my line was a bit off. Once the glue cures I'll shape it a bit more.  Well, back to sanding on the bulkheads.... :angry:

 

 

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It's starting to take shape! There is a slight warp in one of the middle bulkheads that I couldn't straighten out. I'm not sure if it will be an issue or not? All the rest of them are square so I think it will be ok. My next step is checking the fairness. However, I was wondering if I should install the transom first? Or am i thinking to hard?  ;)

 

 

 

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The framework looks pretty good so far. I could not see the warp in the bulk you mention. So long as the center profile former is not warped, you should be okay. A slight warp across one bulkhead will probably not be a big deal. Any difference should be taken care of during the fairing process when you prep the hull for planking.

 

Russ

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looking good so far!  I found that the transom just got in the way while forming the bulkheads ( well it kinda broke off so I left it ) and installed it when I put the plank sheers in place.  One other thing to look at is on the bulkheads where the plank sheer will be placed, I cant tell in your pictures if you already prepped them yet but you have to sand the bulkhead stanchions down a bit so that the plank sheer will fit over the stanchions flush with the outside of the bulkhead.  I was surprised at how much they have to go down and found it a lot easer to prep these as I was fairing out the rest of the ship. 

Edited by SaltyAK

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Haha, I was just looking at that. I did prep the stanchions some but I was afraid of taken them down to much. I can see now that it wasn't even close. Tanks for the tip.

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So, I'm a bit confused about the transom framing piece. I have to bevel it on top and bottom, and then bend it. I guess the bottom dotted line is the underside bevel, and the solid line above it is the top bevel? And then the plans show to bend it to the curve shown. That's where I'm really confused. At what points is that measured?

 

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The dotted line is the outside bevel at the bottom. The second line down from the top is the inboard bevel for the top.

 

You can make up a bending jig based on that curved line they show you. Match the centerline on the plan with the centerline of the actual transom and then use heat and/or moisture to bend the pieces slightly to match that curve.

 

Russ

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I have the bevels cut. But I'm still not sure the way it should be bent. Is it towards the center line from each side? or top to bottom?

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I think I have the correct bend in the transom plate now. It looks about right. I also installed the plank sheers. However, I'm finding that the bulkheads are very brittle. While fairing the frame and shaping the stanchions, I broke several of them. Instead of carving, they seem to kinda just split or that brake right off. I've glued them back in place but think I might have gotten a defective kit. :(

 

post-11407-0-28171800-1393897650_thumb.jpg

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If the bulkheads are solid basswood, breakage of the stanchions is quite common. No real defect here except that basswood is prone to break in these situations. I even had a few break on my current scratch built project. I could have used plywood, but it is harder to work.

 

Russ

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Brian, your not alone with the bulkheads breaking off, the kits use a lower quality plywood for those and the center ply is very soft and almost crumbles.  I'm going to replace a few of mine that broke off too and depending how they look they all might get replaced, I still don't know :huh:

 

Your hull is looking nice and straight!

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On my bluenose, I broke several stanchions and chipped others while trying to shape them.  I glued them back on as best I could and left them on until the bulwark planks were attached.  AFTER  all the planks were all installed and everything was nice and solid, I installed the fake stanchions (I'm assuming your kit will have some) gluing them to the deck and the bulwark.  After those had dried, I carefully cut off the damaged stanchions (breaking the glue joint to the bulwark) and replaced them with fake ones that match.

 

I'm not familiar with your build to know for sure this will work, but it might.   can send you some photos if you like.

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