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Scotland by fishface - Corel - Scale 1:64 - First wooden build


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This is my first model and I am trying to use basic tools (files, glue and sandpaper at this stage) and not spend a bomb on extra's as have a tendency to go bonkers with a new hobby. Reading the manual is "interesting" to say the least and I wish they would print them in plain English! Will upload piccies when I suss out how :)

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The one almost midline has shifted when drying. Any ideas how to re-ease it to realign as glue has set and wood not that strong and dont want to snap it...?

Have relented and got a basic set of rotary tools off ebay as sanding by hand a mare and Ill never finish! Meanwhile finding it hard to keep my eyes open past 9pm so not much done as also need to suss how to move the shifted section - glued with vitalbond wood glue...

Edited by fishface
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Ahoy fishface :D

 

Ahh the joys of model shipbuilding 

 

If this is your glue 

 

http://www.creativemodels.co.uk/vitalbond_original_wood_glue_titebond_120ml-p-29794.html

 

You might be able to dissolve the glue with water. I use the original Titebond which is easily un-bonded with water and a small paint brush. Sometimes I will add some heat via a small hobby heat gun I own but a hair drier will also work. 

 

You can also add some isopropyl alcohol to the mix to strengthen it. Just don't go crazy with the water or you may damage the plywood. Glue some scrap wood together and then try de-bonding this first. Never use your kit as the test dummy.  A small amount is all you need and then let it soak in, wiggle and reapply. Two or three applications will let you know whether it will work or not. Brute force is not needed. 

 

You can also search the site, there are plenty of posts on undoing mistakes 

 

Search for Legos after that. Their great for aligning bulkheads 

 

PS: Spend the time to make this right. Everything else depends on it 

 

Good luck with your kit :) 

Edited by JPett
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Ahoy fishface :D

 

Ahh the joys of model shipbuilding 

 

If this is your glue 

 

http://www.creativemodels.co.uk/vitalbond_original_wood_glue_titebond_120ml-p-29794.html

 

You might be able to dissolve the glue with water. I use the original Titebond which is easily un-bonded with water and a small paint brush. Sometimes I will add some heat via a small hobby heat gun I own but a hair drier will also work. 

 

You can also add some isopropyl alcohol to the mix to strengthen it. Just don't go crazy with the water or you may damage the plywood. Glue some scrap wood together and then try de-bonding this first. Never use your kit as the test dummy.  A small amount is all you need and then let it soak in, wiggle and reapply. Two or three applications will let you know whether it will work or not. Brute force is not needed. 

 

You can also search the site, there are plenty of posts on undoing mistakes 

 

Search for Legos after that. Their great for aligning bulkheads 

 

PS: Spend the time to make this right. Everything else depends on it 

 

Good luck with your kit :)

thanks for this; will have b a bash at it (not literally!!)

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Ahoy Fishface 

 

NP.  It really is the bane of the newbie shipbuilding that such a crucial step should be first. 

 

Remember they don't need to be taken apart, just adjusted. Once you get some Legos or other squaring device you should check the entire build.Take the time to get this right and you will thank yourself later. What you learn here will only help you through out the entire build. 

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As this frame is internal, could you not align it properly and then fix the parts in place with some extra blocking. The blocking can be glued to the "keel" and the broken parts. Maybe even across the broken parts to fix them back together. I have used this method in one form or another many a time. Who cares what it will look like if it is hidden in the hull. The important part is to get the parts aligned and squared properly. Your real concern is where the outside edges of the bulkheads are and how they align to each other.

 

...or...

 

 

you could just order a replacement part and save yourself the hassle and time it would take to make the repair.

 

;) 

 

Good luck!

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Here's a little drawing that might help. Use blocks vertically (seen behind the bulkhead) to square the frame and run a longer piece horizontally on the opposite face across the bulkhead. To do this later step you would need to knock out a notch in the "keel" piece for it to fit through (circled in red). The horizontal piece will help brace the broken parts together.

 

Hope this helps!

 

:)

 

 

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Welcome aboard Fish!

 

I will be happy to follow along on this one,  I have eyed the Scotland a few times, looks interesting - but as I am on a kit buying hiatus (until the closet I have dwindles a little bit) I will live vicariously through yours!

 

 

Some great advice so far on your first steps into ship building - those frames can be pesky sometimes.   Whether to replace or repair a broken part is sometimes a toughie,  to me it depends on how badly damaged it is.  If the broken peice can be aligned properly and look "good as new" with a little bit of effort I will usually try to repair - and creb has a good drawing and plan to do just that!.  

 

Then again I am impatient\ and don't like waiting for parts ;)

 

Am sure you will get a handle on it though!

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Ahoy Fishface :D

 

You can then also add a piece of wood to "connect" the bulkhead to the following one. This is common practice among POB shipbuilding. It makes the hull stronger for planking. Just make sure the wood is a good fit. Too tight and it will bend your keel as it pushes on the bulkheads. Too loose and it will pull on them. Always start from the center, do one on each side, checking the hull for a twist with something straight as you do each one. Checking the hull could be done using something as simple as a straight line drawn on a piece of paper or a jig. The jig is the best, it can be used for multiple things during the build. Just don't use your eyes. 

 

Picture 

 

1 Upgrade connecting bulkheads. (Thx to crebostar for the original)

2 My hull with bulkheads all connected  

3 making a jig 

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Edited by JPett
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Its not a neat snap so going to order a new one but do appreciate the advice and piccies!! Didnt realise how complicated it is!! Wondering whether I have started with a more complex model than was wise? The guy in the shop said it was easy but suspect he meant easy if youve been building models for years?! What is POB jpett?

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Ahoy Fishface :D 

 

POB is "plank on bulkhead". Your kit is POB 

 

The kits are not complicated. They do require some research, planning and lots of patience. All of them, even the easiest. It is all part of the fun.

 

You will learn many things building model ships, the least of which will be how to build a model ship 

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ahh...thanks for that.  :cheers: 

So you  think its doable as a first kit? Am in the process of ordering some balsa wood and will have a bash at replicating the broken piece...how hard can it be with my new thinga-me-jig! Its got a saw on it so reacon I can have a bash!! Watch this space (not too closely mind...gonna take a while!!)

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In my opinion (for what it is worth) I have come to the belief that the idea of an easier kit is in the time and effort, not in the kit itself or the complexities of what has to be done..  They are all essentially a box of wood, some parts, some string and some plans.   Granted, some may take more time and effort than others, but I do not believe there is a "perfect starter model ship".   All are complex in their own ways =)  It isn't like plastic modeling where there are snap together versus crazy 4 foot long 1000 part photo-etched air craft carriers.   I think wooden ship modelling is actually an advanced hobby, so within that advanced hobby the easy kits are still complex B).  Likewise what is easy for one builder is hard for another and vice versa.

 

(Scratch built and/or plans kits are the exceptions =) ... those are crazy skills :P )

 

You can do it Fish, you can do it!  Patience will pay off and every mistake is a skill being honed.   What is difficult today, won't be so difficult the next time around :dancetl6:

Edited by SkerryAmp
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Hey, Fishface, welcome to the marvelous, wondrous, just fantastic hobby of building model ships. As you´re struggling with the bulkhead alignment - I must confess that in my first ship I didn´t even gave too much thought to that and just maybe, maybe she´s a little bit pending to one side -  lucky you to have everyone´s help on that and that you are willing to fix that. Don´t worry about the fix, though. Crebostar showed a great idea to strengthen your bulkead - after that, you can also glue a strip from one to another bulkhead.

 

Try not to be bashed by this early mistake, too. As we build them ships we make lots of mistakes (I´m on my second, just on the start for the third) - and tools come as you need them. It´s a hobby, all about having fun! Enjoy ^_^

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whoop whoop! I did it!! One new piece made and currently drying in place along with a couple of batons! Thank all! Can also now see why you boys like power toys....loving my new thinkamegig but think it wise to get a table clamp as sawing in my knees with a tray going to end in tears me thinks!!

 

Jpett just seen that you are in Dallas! I spent many a happy (but hot!)time there when I was a nanny to an American family many years ago (my "boys" are now in college!)...still remember the takeout chicken, mash, gravy and corn bread!! yumm!

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The thingamejig is a 234 piece tool kit! Ship is drying at present and will post piccy over weekend but jpett it will be nowhere near as precise as you would like! Been looking at your build log and flipping heck you have patience in spades!!

So for my next question how do I make sure that the edges/top are correctly aligned? The plans look like the top sect (with "planking" either side of each slat) should effectively fit in with the bottom bit = a bit puzzle like if I have done it correct;y? Looking at the top lie there needs to besome adjustment to be straight but the sides I cant tell with...$_57.JPG

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