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Mysticfr

Hello from the Bluegrass state ... of confusion that is .

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 Thank's for allowing me to join . I have never built / completed a model ship . When my wife and I were wed we decided to head to Mystic Seaport for our honey moon . She fell in love with the Charles W. Morgan and a few years later she gave me a Charles W. Morgan for my anniversary gift . That was about 21 years ago and my plan is to give it back to her on our 25th anniversary . My prayer is to build it in 3 years . I am looking to you all to help me with this task . The Morgan by Model Shipways  looks to be a beast of a build . I am more into WWII aircraft and 1/72nd ground equipment . The tall ships and river packets have always been of interest to me so this could be an adventure and a great new hobby for me .

 

Respectfully, Mysticfr

Edited by Mysticfr

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Welcome aboard.

 

Wow the Morgan as a first build. There are many good build logs for the Morgan on this site. She has a blunt bow which may be intimidating. Build a bending frame and practice. You can do this just take your time, don’t let frustration cause you to quit. Your bride is going to love it.

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Good Morning Mysticfr,

The CWM is going to be my next project; I have one waiting on the shelf. While I think it will be a challenging build, there are plenty of good resources available. There are some build logs on this site and one builder has created his own website about his build, which offers lots of good advice and many good photos of the real ship. It's at www.charleswmorganmodel.com.  Another builder has developed a mini practicum on how to build the tryworks, which is worth taking a look at. It's available under the resources section of the NRG website. And, of course, the actual ship itself is always available for first hand reference! 

I'll be starting mine this fall, so I'll be looking forward to following your progress at the same time.

David

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David , thank's for the link , most interesting to say the least . I think the whale boats will be the best place to start for me .

 

Everyone thank's for the warm welcome !

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Hi Mysticfr,

The whale boats are mini kits in themselves. While I haven't started my CWM yet, I did make four similar boats for my Constitution. Shaping the exteriors is relatively easy, but it's very hard shaping the interiors; it's difficult to get even the smallest tool into the corners at the bow and stern. I have since read of two techniques that might be helpful and I'm planning to try this time. The first is to leave the bottom piece off until after you've shaped the interiors. The allows much easier access from both top and bottom. And the second idea that I'm interested in trying is a little more drastic. It also involves leaving the bottom off at first, but then running the boat through a band saw lengthwise which would allow very easy access to the interior of each separate side. Once each interior side is shaped, glue the two halves back together, then add the bottom. Once all that is done, then shape the exterior.

 

I'm not sure yet how helpful these techniques will be, but with seven boats to do, there's plenty of room for experimentation!

David  

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On 7/30/2018 at 5:28 AM, David Lester said:

Hi Mysticfr,

The whale boats are mini kits in themselves. While I haven't started my CWM yet, I did make four similar boats for my Constitution. Shaping the exteriors is relatively easy, but it's very hard shaping the interiors; it's difficult to get even the smallest tool into the corners at the bow and stern. I have since read of two techniques that might be helpful and I'm planning to try this time. The first is to leave the bottom piece off until after you've shaped the interiors. The allows much easier access from both top and bottom. And the second idea that I'm interested in trying is a little more drastic. It also involves leaving the bottom off at first, but then running the boat through a band saw lengthwise which would allow very easy access to the interior of each separate side. Once each interior side is shaped, glue the two halves back together, then add the bottom. Once all that is done, then shape the exterior.

 

I'm not sure yet how helpful these techniques will be, but with seven boats to do, there's plenty of room for experimentation!

David  

David take a peak at the Master Korabel Small boat kits. They are a dream compared to others on the market and come in several different scales.

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Given the complexity of the Morgan . I have decided to back off the whale boats for awhile and due a few long boats from Model Shipways and the Providence from Arestania Latina as it is considered an entry level kit .Then maybe the Kate Cory .  Some of the articles point out one could get discouraged very easily . The thaught of giving up is just not acceptable .  The Shipways kits are the little bread and butter kit and planking kits of long boats . For $9.00 each how could I go wrong trying something new ? I will post some pictures as I go and again thank's for the info .

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I had to hold myself back from jumping in with both feet on the Constitution which is a big build.  I built one "learning kit" which was the Model Shipways Armed Virginia Sloop, and found it was enough to give me the confidence to tackle the Constitution. I believe the CWM is a pretty big build too, so your idea of getting some experience under your belt first is probably a good one. The Kate Cory should be a good choice to give you the type of experience you need to take on the CWM.

David

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