Jump to content

Kelpie

Members
  • Content Count

    14
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Ordered some mini planes for the mast and they sent a hacksaw. Had to reorder. Started on the hull removing old filler that was chipping out and sanding the rough spots. Was able to take a look at the original photos and the standing rigging is a bit weird to me. The two outside shrouds are attached at the top of the mast, and the three inner shrouds are attached just above the gaff boom. Has anyone seen this before?
  2. How large of a blank should I have to start? I was thinking no larger than one inch or so. Is that the right size? I downloaded the article on making masts from square stock.
  3. John, I was considering work on the hull. When I got it, the hull had been banging around from place to place for 70 years and was all beat up. There are some areas where some 100 year old wood putty has chipped out and also areas where the hull could use some light sanding. The top was originally white, when I refinished it it was stained it to look more like a deck. Not sure if I will paint the deck, or leave it stained. I do have a couple of hand planes, so that may make the work on the mast easier. It would be nice to use the hand drill method of a lathe, but the mast needs to be finished to about 0.71 inches, and my drill does not open up that far. Dad has the original photos, so I'm going to get a look at those. My photo is a copy.
  4. Unfortunately, I do not have access to much more than a table saw down at Dad's house. I did see some threads on how a mast can be built using straight lumber. I may give it a go, but I do not have access to a planer or anything like that.
  5. Still working on a parts list. Looking at the photo, it looks like it uses chainplates and turnbuckles. The chainplates are still on the model (some I made back in 1980), but I cannot see how the turnbuckles were attached. Guess I'll use some small shackles. The single and double blocks measure out to about 7mm in length. The turnbuckles are about 1.17 inches. Not sure at all about the cleats, thinking 12mm at the largest. Not sure if they were wood or metal, as none were left, but I can get an idea of the number from looking at old nail holes on the deck. The nails were about the size of a pin.
  6. Well, the dowels I have to choose from are too large. The mast isn't quite 3/4, its more like .70 in. I thought I would try an 11/16 dowel and look for a mast base to use. Measuring the photo again in several places puts the diameter between .7 and .68, so 11/16 doesn't seem too horribly small. The bowsprit measures to around 3/8, and the boom and gaff are around 1/4. The more I look with the microscope, the more lines and blocks I am finding. I am up to 15 now, and maybe more. Also, the boom was adjusted with a traveller.
  7. I pulled the mast, and the hole in the deck is 3/4 inch, but the hole in the keel for the mast is 1/4 inch. I did the math on the mast diameter using the Gaff Rig Handbook and by measuring a copy of the photo that Dad has, and it looks to be 3/4 inch or so on the photo. Anyone have any ideas on the mast diameter I should use? I am leaning toward 3/4 inch because of measuring the photo, but I cannot find any mast bases that would fit properly. Looking at several sources online and the Gaff Rig Handbook, I'm guessing that the original boat was at least 35 feet long. This looks to be about 1:12 scale... Dad found the original photo, so I may be able to look at something with better resolution. Looking around inside the hill with a gun bore light and looking through the long crack in the deck, it looks like the hull was carved from one piece of wood,with the deck fastened to the top.
  8. Thanks for the advice Roger. Sounds like I'm over thinking it a bit. It looks like the main and topsails were the only ones that moved. I'll go in that direction. Think I'll paint the mast and bowsprit white and add another smaller boom for the topsail. Gotta figure out what size of rings and pulleys to order
  9. I've found a few online articles to help with the rigging. Some from this website. Is there a book that anyone would recommend that I could buy to help? Since our library is closed, I can't get any books from there. There were also quite a few remenants of small carved cleats on the deck that I need to replace. Without knowing exactly how much of the rigging worked, I am not sure how far to go with it. I may build the rigging so that the main and topsails are the ones that can be operated. I don't see much evidence on the photo that implies that the jibs could be moved.
  10. thanks for the replies. I figure I should keep the original hardware. Those racing yachts do look very similar. Does anyone know where I can get a rigging plan that would work? I don't have much of an idea how to rig this thing to make it all work again. I'll either shorten the mast or make another one. We made the current mast, bowsprit, and boom, so I have no problem re-working anything above the deck.
  11. Hello All, I have a model that was built by my Great Grandfather for my Grandmother back around 1913. Dad and I decided top rename it Virginia Ruth, my Grandmothers first and middle name. It is supposed to be modeled from a sloop(?) that he was familiar with in the Gulf at Homosassa, Fl. Way back in 1980 or so, I did a cosmetic rebuild for a 4-H project. I want to restore it to how he built it. The hull is hollow and we think it may be made out of Bald Cyprus. All I had to work with was the hull and a photograph. My grandmother said that all the rigging operated as it was supposed to, but none of that is left. He used pulleys and other hardware sourced from England. I guessed on the mast height based on measuring the photo and the actual hull. I repainted it, and stained the top for more of a deck feel. I am open to modifying the ship to make it as close to how it would have been in reality. Most of the hardware on the deck is original and I do have the anchor. The hull measures 32 1/2" long on the deck. it measures 6 1/2" tall at the mast. Here are two photos when it was new. My Great-Grandfather's shadow is visible. Here are two photos of how it looks now. Pretty much a butcher job as I had no idea what I was doing. I am willing to replace and add what hardware needs to be added. I have a set of sails for it that were made from measurements and drawings of the original photo and measurements of the hull. I really do not like the metal bits that are used for deadeyes or maybe in this case turnbuckles. Let me know what you think and don't hold back. Thanks, Russell M.
  12. Will do. It will be a slow process as I don't yet know the scale of parts I will need. It's not an especially detailed model from the two photos I have, but my Grandmother said that he had it rigged such that everything worked as it should.
  13. Mark, Should I post them here, or in a different post?
  14. Hello All, I have not built any models of consequence, just a few plastic things when I was a kid. I do however need help in rebuilding a model that was built by my Great Grandfather for my Grandmother back around 1913 or so. She said it was modeled after a ship he was familiar with in the Gulf near Homosassa, Fl.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...