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Rodolfo Bigoni

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About Rodolfo Bigoni

  • Birthday 04/18/1955

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  1. Welcome everybody! The construction of masting immediately presents the first problem, which is the size of the blocks. I think there is a disproportion (first photo) between the rack and the block of the halyard: In commerce I have not found blocks with the particular shape in medieval ships and so I decided to build it with pieces of wood, slices of wood rod and pin heads: The four pins serve as spacers between pulleys and edges during gluing: A through hole at the top, a countersink for the openings, a light scraping and a walnut impregnating paint co
  2. Congratulations! I think that restoring a sailing ship is more difficult than building it from scratch. You are doing a great job! Rodolfo
  3. Thanks Louie and welcome you all! The anchors according to AMATI should have four square metal rings to keep the sections that make up the stock together: After covering the stock with walnut veneer, I preferred ligatures with ropes. At the anchor ring I preferred to tie a knot that I found on Luciano Santoro's manual "Il modellista navale" Ed. HOEPLI: Next we will try to guess the path of the anchor's ropes, since it's difficult to understand examining contemporary documents. Have a nice weekend! Rodolfo.
  4. Thanks, Louie! Building the rack, instructions indicate a height of 74 mm: ; It's clearly a mistake, because a man 1m and 70 cm high in 1/60 scale is about 28 mm. I thought a printing error and then 74 was a 24. It also indicates two 2.7 mm slots; but in this way you DO NOT get the perception that the rope passes through the sheaves: Considering that the sheaves are generally not much smaller in diameter than the width of the case (here 8 mm) I preferred to make two slots of about 8 mm in length with holes above and below and an excavation to sim
  5. Hi Patrick, I've always slept like a hibernating bear! 🙂 Before continuing with the superstructures, it's better to secure the load; indeed, it is already late because now it has become difficult to get the ropes through the rings. With hindsight, I recommend fixing the barrels before covering the upper deck. I preferred a certain asymmetry, as if the operations were not finished yet. See you soon! Rodolfo
  6. Hi Backer, I have examined the arrangement of the nails and, fortunately, it seems to me that there are no problems. If I had to modify it, maybe I could have damaged it and then rebuilt it. Examining the object sideways, you will see that the rows of nails are not above the side walls: They are shifted inwards; they are assumed to be planted on a support located underneath that holds the boards of the flaps together. I also remembered that the nails on the hinges were reproduced using drops of Vinavil, as I didn't have any so thin. Now, with my conscience
  7. Thanks to all of you for your comments and remarks always welcome! @ Backer: You're absolutely right! I hadn't thought about it: I saw this beautiful model: and then I copied it without thinking. After all, I'm just a railway modeler...and my commissioners (my family, which doesn't distinguish Bismarck from Titanic) just want a nice ornament, they have no idea of the historical fidelity. Nevertheless, since the piece is not yet in position, I think I will modify it in order to make it more plausible. I am sure that if I don't do it now, in
  8. Thanks, Chuck. in my opinion, reading instructions and looking at the figures, it seems that the holes are just simple holes: The two major ones have been made for the passage of the anchors ropes and the others (maybe) for ventilation: But the Nao of Matarò has no hole on the roof of the deckhouse. Moreover, the hole with a diameter of 10 mm clearly seems to me a mistake: it would be too big, as shown in the photos with a 10 mm drill bit: They seem to me having a diameter about 4 or 5 mm. Rodolfo
  9. Thanks Louie, now it's time for the main deckhouse. I made it at the beginning of the building. AMATI suggests a simple object, very similar to the Coca of Matarò: But I'm not sure about the holes in the roof. In Pinterest I saw a very nice ship and i tried to copy it: Next works: rack with cleat, mast hound, pole and bracket. See you later! Rodolfo
  10. Bye, it's very strange: in my screenshot I can see the photos. Immediately I'll put them on again. The model proposed by the supplier: Having it a trapezoidal plan, I filed the corners of the supports to create the seats for the strips: An alternative could be gluing triangular wedges on which to lay their ends. Obviously, the remaining work is equal to the one already used for the rails: Long time ago, I added some reinforcement beams on the bottom side, otherwise the structure seemed too fragile: Here are some pictures
  11. Hello, everyone, finally the little stern castle has been finished. Long time ago, I added some reinforcement beams on the bottom side, otherwise the structure seemed too fragile: Here are some pictures of the completed and painted structure: Good work to everyone and see you next post. Rodolfo
  12. Greetings to all! I continued with the construction of the stern castle. The model proposed by the supplier is quite simple: Having it a trapezoidal plan, I filed the corners of the supports to create the seats for the strips: An alternative could be gluing triangular wedges on which to lay their ends. Obviously, the remaining work is equal to the one already used for the rails: See you later! Rodolfo
  13. Well done, Amos: I like the idea to use a strip formed to line the indented edge of the upper deck. Rodolfo
  14. Thank Louie, the illustration is taken from a Catalan treaty of maritime law, printed in Barcelona in 1502: "Libre de Consolat dels fets maritims". Bye
  15. I thank you all for the kind comments that help me to continue the work. Now the quarterdeck rail has been ended and painted: See you soon with the little stern castle. Rodolfo
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