Jump to content

Quarter Deck Railing composition for rigging lines


kruginmi
 Share

Recommended Posts

(Pulled this from my build log, seemed a more logical place to ask the question)


 


A future problem to tackle involves the quarter deck rail (pic from full Druid mid-construction):


post-6104-0-78594200-1450810471.jpg


 


The following lines are connected to this rail:


1.  Mainsail clewlines


2.  Mainsail buntlines


3.  Mainsail Leechlines


4.  Topsail Clewlines


5.  Topsail reef tackles


6.  Topgallant sheets


 


The question is how?  Per the plans this rail is not a real 'beefy' one.  Tying them all just to the top rail would seem foolhardy given the stresses.  Normally you would see some sheaves either attached to, or through the bases of each column but these rails seem too thin for that.  At the very least belay pins seem in order (total 16, 4 between each post), but the runs of the lines are in question.  With two lines per category (port / starboard) I currently do not have a firm decision.


 


If I was rigging a full ship you would also add:


1.  Mainstaysail halyard


2.  Mizzen Topsail Bowline


3.  Fore Topgallant Brace


 


Any opinions?


Mark


Link to comment
Share on other sites

For some more of my source data.  These are snippets from the Smithsonian plans for the original HMS Brilliant.  This is referencing the AFT BREAST RAIL.

 

post-6104-0-66584900-1450834176_thumb.jpgpost-6104-0-44436900-1450834177_thumb.jpg

 

You can see how small the posts for the rail are.  Not even the width of the pin rail on the bulwark, and looks like not even the same thickness.  Hard to believe sheaves are stuck to them.  There is a little brace on two of the five posts near the base.

 

The sheave illustrated for the kevel (on the bulwark) shows using a sheave is possible.

 

Ho Ho Ho,

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Henry.  I somewhat agree however.....I am thinking (maybe my first mistake) that you add the 17 lines all together and it would add up.

 

The plans seem to show nothing special, just use the belaying pins and only the top rail.  I just wondered if there was something I was missing.

 

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a little worried about the cumulative stresses too. Initially I though maybe there would be lead blocks on the deck under the rail so the lines wold lead down to those blocks then up to the pins and the force would be pulling down on the rail not lifting it off. But thats a lot of blocks. A lot of the lines you list don't cause too much alarm but ANY hailyard or the Mainsail and Topsail Clewlines ARE going to have heavy loads on them and there is no way, in my opinion, they could be made on that rail, even run through sheaves in the stanchions. I would put the Main Clews on the Jeer Bits if it was me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The stanchions to this rail are bolted to the deck beam beneath: making it more than strong enough to cope. Belaying pins on that rail would only be introduced around 1800ish or later. Usually there were single sheaves in the stanchions below the lower rail, just above the deck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adding to the mix is that this is a deck 'add on.'  The British added it upon purchase of the cargo ship to allow the installation of the capstan.  They did add two new vertical supports that go through the cargo hatches directly below that support this rail.

 

I will look at moving the mainsail clew lines or introduction of single sheaves just for their use.  

 

As for the belaying pins, the plans were for the US cargo ship as built in 1774.  I just assumed they were appropriate for the period.

 

Thanks for all the help!

Mark

Edited by kruginmi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whoops - clarification.  The plans shown are BEFORE the deck was extended so.....the railing ended up once converted by the British to be over the fore end of the cargo hatch shown on the plans (but still same size and shape).  It would end just before the right side of the snippet shown.

 

I believe the original questions are still valid.  I am opting towards adding sheaves for the clews at the lower end of the stanchions.

 

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rigging plans referenced were prepared for the Smithsonian Institution by Merritt A. Edson, Jr. in 1976.  This was for (I believe) a model constructed of the original Brilliant.  Mr. Hahn did pull the British drawn conversion plans for his hull model plans and I have no idea if rigging ones also exist.

 

Since it is a Frankenstein ship (a little it of this, a little bit of that) I am not too concerned about exact accuracy, if that is possible at all.  This is an exercise in learning all things rigging and how to properly replicate them in scale for me.  It is a good mental task to work through all of this stuff and not just accept anything drawn as unquestionable.

 

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After much thinking, egg nog and input from people, I have come to a decision....(drum roll)....

 

I will be adding blocks affixed directly to the deck beam below the deck using ring bolts for those lines of concern  (look at added green and purple annotations):

post-6104-0-76484700-1451260350_thumb.jpg

 

The sheets, brace and two clewlines will incorporate these blocks, which equates to two blocks between each railing section.  The single halyard will use a double block with the starboard mainsail clew line (though not present on this build).

 

Happy New Year,

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...