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Topsail yard tie rig on 1763 cutter (Sherbourne)


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Another question while I try to figure out the rigging for my yards.

 

I'm trying to figure out how to rig the topsail yard tie. Steel says the following:

 

"Tie reeves from aft, through the sheave hole in the mast-head, comes down, and clinches round the slings of the yard: the other end has a double block spliced, that connects by its fall to a single block hooked in the channel; the fall leads through a leading block on the gunwale, and belays to a cleat or timber-head."

 

I'm ok as far as the single block hooked in the channel, but I can't work out the subsequent route of the fall. Thus I see it as:

 

post-229-0-44330300-1463932760.jpg

 

So could someone help me as to how the fall would go to the timberhead? The way I see it is that if it does go through another block on the gunwale, there would be no mechanical advantage at all.

 

Of course I may be missing something obvious, so that's why I'm asking the professionals!

 

Thanks

 

Tony

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Hello Tony,

 

The leading block allows the fall to be conveniently led inboard to allow  the crew plenty of hauling space to raise or lower the yard. A bit more awkward with the fall coming straight down to the cleat,in that case anyway it's likely a snatch block hooked into a deck ringbolt would have been used as a lead.

 

Hope this is of help.

 

Dave :dancetl6:  

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The purpose of a  leading block (or fairlead, chock or roller chock) is to change the direction of the working part of the line.  While it does not multiply the force of the pull, there is a mechanical advantage.  How many men can you employ to haul on a line if the pull is vertical as opposed to horizontal?  :o  ;)

 

Regards,

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Thanks, Henry. My confusion was that I didn't see how the direction would be changed since the channels are about the same height as the gunwale. So the line from a block which is raised from the channels would then feed to a block that is attached to the gunwale and then to a timber-head which is also at the same height.

 

I hadn't seen any advantage over simply pulling the line inboard from a block that was already at or near gunwale height when it was placed on a channel.

 

I hope that helps you see why I was confused!

 

Tony

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