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allanyed

NRG Member
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About allanyed

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  • Birthday 04/25/1947

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    allanyed6469@gmail.com
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ave Maria, Florida
  • Interests
    Golf, fishing, ship modeling

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  1. D, This can be confusing but in your photos the pieces with single holes really don't look much like blocks at all. The shape is not accurate and there is a hole that appears to be way over scale and in the wrong place. There is a slot formed when the shell pieces and crown and tail pieces are assembled, not holes. The sheave is assembled within this box. Google wooden block assembly and there are a lot of photos of blocks and drawings. The following may help in the meantime. Note the shape over all compared to what the kit has provided. You can make your own that will be mu
  2. Thanks Steven, Try this https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/trafalgar-squared/id1563155730 There is a trailer, then episode 1.
  3. Welcome to MSW Drew. As mentioned in detail above, there are a lot of build logs on Bounty, probably more than any other single ship, here at MSW. There are probably hours of study information that should help you along. As to rigging, you may want to look at the rigging forum here as much of what has been posted applies to any ship, including Bounty. There are a lot of does and don'ts that will help you avoid the many mistakes that most of us have made when we were rookies in this hobby of ours. Several rigging books of note are discussed as well. You may want to consider adding one
  4. Steven, as a Nelson fan, have you signed on to Adam Preston's Trafalgar site and pod cast? He has been working with a number of folks in the television industry to get a series made about Trafalgar, with a major side story surrounding the relationship of Nelson and Emma Hamilton. We have been communicating and he is in the process of getting folks to sign on to his podcasts and website in general which will give him the ammunition he needs to get the series off the ground. A little background is in the following email I received from Adam yesterday. Hi Allan Thanks fo
  5. There are actually sometimes more sheaves than I show on that drawing, depends on the ship. Some are for sheets, some are for braces, some are for tacks. I don't know if it is appropriate to use a 16 gun Swan Class (Vulture) as an example for Discovery. It MAY be right, but maybe not. Hopefully others here will know.
  6. Hard to tell without a drawing. Sounds like the forward one is for the main sail tack which would first pass through a chesstree on the hull. You would really do yourself a huge favor by getting a copy of Lees' Masting and Rigging or other time period appropriate book as these will help make sense of the many lines and associated items like the through-hull sheaves, fore tack blocks on the bumpkins, chesstrees, etc. I really am not one to spend other people's money, but when it comes to rigging, at least one, good, time-appropriate, source is essential and worth the investment.
  7. Don, Are you going to do other internal planking? If you are you should consider putting on a few ribbands on the hull to hold the frames true while adding the internal planking which would usually start with the limber strakes then the thickstuff, then the lower deck clamp and so forth. When you get to where there are two or three more strakes of thick stuff before you get to the lower deck clamp, CAREFULLY mark the run of the strakes of clamps. Keep in mind that in your time frame, the deck clamps were likely mortised to allow the deck beams to be let down into the top of the clamp a
  8. Thanks Pat, Carvings are being done as carvings, and painted decorative work is what I was not happy with. Decal paper has never worked for me so I went with paper, and now archival paper types as they appear to have a history of good longevity. Painting on paper is not new, it was really a study I wanted to do in what kind of paper worked best for painting the freizes and panels. I drew the items, in this case the fleur de lis with the CAD program as a guide for painting, but the detail was so small and difficult for me even with 4X magnifier and nearly single hair brush I thought ju
  9. Mark, I bought the samples of several types of archival paper and printed and painted on each of them. The two best results were printed rather than printed and painted or just painted. I drew the fleur-de-lis on TurboCad with various colors then printed on each of the six different archival paper samples. The samples that were painted on top of the printed samples were not nearly as neat in the details even using a super small high quality brush. Of course shaky old hands may have had a part in that. The thinnest paper samples would have been good when gluing to
  10. I was not happy with some of the painted items for the stern, specifically the fleur-de-lis and did a little experimenting. Rather than paint directly on the wood I bought several types of archival paper and printed and painted samples. The two best results were printed rather than painted. I drew the fleur-de-lis on TurboCad with various colors then printed on each of six different archival paper samples. The samples that were painted on top of the printed samples were not nearly as neat in the details even using a super small high quality brush. Of course shaky old hands may have had
  11. Marcus, You should be pleased with a draw plate but do not go cheap. One of the best is from Jim Byrnes and is $25. There are Chinese ones for half the price and they are worth less than half the price. As is normal, you get what you pay for. I am sure there are other good quality ones out there and someone may give some info on them for you to check out. Bamboo skewers are cheap and available everywhere. Just split them as many times as you can with a sharp blade until the strips will fit in the largest hole on the plate and then go from there. As you have not done this be
  12. We had something very similar in the US in the 20th century. We called it the draft, but it was pretty much the same thing sans the kidnapping part.
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