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Thanks Mark - Good to hear it's more than page after page of technical stats in tables.  I have seen a few online that claim to be a 2 volume set "special edition". I'll keep my eyes open. Maybe a late Christmas gift to me.

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Dafi

I don't know about copyrights in Europe but in the US it is for the life of the author plus 70 years if published after 1978. If prior to 1978 it is 95 years. It was published about 1995 so still protected and I assume not available for free. I have volume two and it was worth saving up for.

Allan

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 I have volume two and it was worth saving up for.

Allan

 

That's what I am confused about there appears to be more than one "edition'  One appears to be a single book that covers the  entire date range.  The other claims to be a limited edition set (2 volumes).  Does anyone have any knowledge on what's what?

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I have come across some reading in Lavery's Ship of the Line V2 that describes the cannon ignition. Sounds like a long gun on a basic truck would take off like a freight train. While the tackles and even the wheel sizes were intended to help slow down, the breech rope is what really did it.

 

He also claims the recoil distance was more substantial than what I had expected. A 24 pounder had a breech tackle 34' long and could recoil up to 17'.   A 6 pounder had a 23' breech line and could recoil about 10' . Ample room to get the tools into the barrel without having to hang out a port window.

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Mike

Because a 24 pounder could travel that far does necessarily mean it was allowed to. If it recoiled 17 feet those opposite a hatch would wimd up down on the next deck. Look at the sketch I posted earlier. That shows 15 feet of travel on a deck that carried 24 pounders. These cannon never come inboard enough to use the tools without going through the gun ports.

Allan

Edited by allanyed
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Mike,

 

I did some digging and cannot find any single addition, only the two volume set, but they can be purchased separately   Most of the models I see on the forum would make Volume II the most useful, but I have been digging into a ship that would require me to have Volume I if I cannot find the information elsewhere in my small library.    I really hate having to see the admiral rolling her eyes if  I mention the need to buy another book related to ship modeling.  She does not buy into the argument that I keep using that it is an investment :rolleyes:

 

Allan 

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Allen - that limited edition set would look great in anyone's library. I can almost smell the leather covers. :)

 

I think I was getting the hardbound version confused. It appears to be 2 volumes. Abe Books in the UK has several - hardbound and limited editions.

Edited by mikiek

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Right back at you Allen. The guy did reply this morning. About $700 shipped and he claims it is like new.

 

There was another set for less but the condition did not sound quite as good. I'll check with them.

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On 25/12/2016 at 4:35 PM, allanyed said:

Mike

Because a 24 pounder could travel that far does necessarily mean it was allowed to. If it recoiled 17 feet those opposite a hatch would wimd up down on the next deck. Look at the sketch I posted earlier. That shows 15 feet of travel on a deck that carried 24 pounders. These cannon never come inboard enough to use the tools without going through the gun ports.

Allan

Mike's comment is particularly true in the case of smaller ships, up to and including frigates.  The following is an extract from Plan 7B of the ANCRE book “L’Aurore” (18 gun frigate of 1697-1720) by Jean‑Claude Lemineur & Patrick Villiers:

 

recoil-distance.thumb.jpg.7267c37bed766e29f08c4a44d7471614.jpg

 

This ship had a significant tumblehome, so I have shaded in the line of the top of the gunports.  It is clear that, even at full recoil within the confines of the other deck fittings, the muzzles would barely have cleared the ports.

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