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Hello forumists.

 

After a very long delay I've finally finished my San Francisco (#1) and now I am between 2 ships. I've ordered the Bellona but there seems to be a problem with the delivery. Doesn't matter, I am gathering as much info as I can and here's a question: On every model I've looked at the brass railings are kept brass. It sure looks pretty but is it historically correct for an 18th century ship of the line?

Cheers

 

Pieter

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Pieter

 

The short answer is I do not think there were any brass railings on any ship of the line in the 18th century.  These would all be wood, and most likely painted or other wise protected.    If you choose to go with wood  they are easy to make with home made cutters made from pieces of an old hacksaw blade or stiff back single edge razor.  That said, if you choose to use the brass in the kit, I imagine they can be  painted any color you feel is appropriate, be it black, a wood tone, or left alone as you mention.

 

Allan

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Hey Pieter, brass, bronze and mixed metal were in use at that time, mostly for bolts, bottom protection ('coppering' which was mixed metal), cannon, binnacles and the like.  Iron was cheaper and although it would rust, got painted.

 

Unless you have documentation, paint them dull black.      Duff

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Wow that was quick ;o)

Thanks a lot for your answers! I dug up one picture of the victory with obviously black handrails so that helps a bit, wood seems a nice alternative.

 

victoryday.jpg

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It’s true all the brass on a ship is going to be regularly polished. But in my opinion there’s WAY too much bright shiny brass on miniature ship models. Particularly what I’m thinking of is the two-tone ship model that has two colors: the dark brown of the varnished wood and the outrageously shiny brass flecked all over the hull and deck. On these models everything made of metal (and many things that are not!) are bright shiny brass. In my view the only things that should be shinny brass are the bell and the actual handrails -not the railing supports not the hinges on the doors, not the pintels and gudgeons, not the block strops or hooks, or the sheaves, not the anchor and certainly not any chain anywhere.....you get the picture.

Edited by JerseyCity Frankie

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...you get the picture. 

 

Hi Frankie

Absolutely! The little rings are among the first things to land in the "archive" ...

 

Cheers

 

Pieter

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Pieter,

 

My misunderstanding.  I thought you were referring to the sheer , cap, counter and other rails on the sides of the ship, not at the stair openings.   

Cheers

 

Allan

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Hi Allan

Actually I was referring to all the brass railings but the only picture I could find through Auntie Google was this one. Sorry for the confusion!

Cheers

Pieter

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