Jump to content
Byrnes Saw Auction - See in Naut General Discussion ×
Sign in to follow this  
Matrim

Mast Document Translation

Recommended Posts

K, In my attempts to get a rough idea of sizes at scale and I am looking at masts. Lees gives 1815 values for a 38 but nothing close to the 1798-1818 period for a 32. Therefore I am looking at seeing what other info I can gather and I do have some random scribbles on a ripped out muster sheet. Most of it lists the sails (which is fine) but the bottom bit lists some other information that might relate to a mast/yard/bowsprit or something else. I cant make head not tail of it so am putting it out here in case anyone is fluent in 'bad handwriting related to something on ship'

 

Looks like we have an extension of something and a 'spirit' length to me but if that is the sprit? (bowsprit) or spiritsail /yard/etc

 

Any guesses welcome..

 

sailplan.thumb.jpg.21965fa940fd2dfc01f38f3c84cb069c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have recently been transcribing a lot of documents and found the 'running' writing sometimes scrawled/written quickly could be hard to read.  To my eye that word is Sprit (as in the sprit yard/sail) as fitted to the bowsprit/jib?  It looks like the writer didn't close up the 'p' and uses the old english form of 'r' making it appear like a separate letter?

 

Just one further interpretation :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Banyan's interpretation of the "p" and the "r".

 

Looks like

 

"length of the sprit 31.10" (31 ft 10 inches?) 

 

Then "(something) of the deck 24"

 

"below 5.3"

 

"(extension?) of head 29.3 +2 = 31.3"

 

"(Head?) 5.3"

 

"New Mark 36.8"

 

"length of the sprit 31.10"

 

Steven

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second line: "Main (indecipherable word, possibly 'Mail') above deck     24"

 

Although 'Mail' does not make much sense! Perhaps 'Mast'? Any other ideas, anyone? If it is a mast, the measurements must surely be in yards/inches, not feet/inches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hi Druxey, I read that as Main Mast above the deck 24?  Asto the extension, this may relate to an extension of the head, but your ship may be a little early for that.  Mid-19th C ships had extensions added to make them "Taunt" as described by Kipping and Fincham (that is tall).  However, if we interpret the above deck measurement as being from the partners to the hounds (which is standard), the extension may be referring to the 'head' or doubling?

 

cheers

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ooo. All good interpretations. Though I am curious as to why that information relates to a sail plan. Unless it was to help size the sails for the available mast 'space'. It is a nice rare working scribble though I am surprised it survived. Probably chucked in a draw somewhere with something more important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does it make sense if those measurements are to do with where the spiritsail yard is in relation to the bowsprit length? So we have 5.3 foot out of sight, 24 ft over the deck then the head and relevant extensions all eventually used to flag that location? Or is the 24ft distance for the deck just too large. On a 38 the bowsprit is 55 ft long approx (and as a 32 this would be possibly 16% or so smaller? - so around 46 foot) - allowing it has not been deliberately overmasted etc which I doubt as they were deliberately designed to be slightly smaller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hi again, the distance seems OK to me but I will leave to more experienced and knowledgeable people to respond more adequately :)    The bowsprit (outer end) for my Victoria (1855) is 23 feet (for a ship of 166 feet between perpendiculars and of 580 tons) so you are in the ball park I think ?  I am unfamiliar with spritsail yards and the like so can't offer too much more to assist you; sorry.

 

It is surprising what info is stored and what is lost.  For example I have hundreds of letters  written between the Crown Agency, the build Supervisor and the Governor of Victoria at the time, many of which refer to literally nearly a hundred drawings/sketches and plans - while the letters have been preserved, not a single plan or sketch has been :(

 

cheers

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Good Evening Matrim;

 

This might help you settle the sizes.

 

See below an extract from a 1790 volume in the British Library. This gives mast & yard dimensions for a vessel of every class, including Iris, a 32 gun ship. The photograph is slightly out-of-focus as the reading rooms are not brightly lit, and the BL do not allow the use of camera stands, so everything is hand-held with an elongated exposure.

 

The bowsprit is 52'8" (given as 17 yards & 20 inches)

 

Note that the reference to 'flying jib-boom' is actually referring to the jib-boom. This was commonly called a flying jib-boom from its introduction in the early 18th century. 

 

If you need anything more, let me know.

 

All the best,

 

Mark P

 

769035032_Matrim1.thumb.PNG.ab1725809d36bad91a393b58381e0e63.PNG

 

1393576298_Matrim2.thumb.PNG.bf7478ed52812fab68f679a0d29b67c1.PNG

Edited by Mark P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh Mark you absolute hero. I was considering making a 38 masts proportional for my 32 as Lees has nothing at the correct age range but that is absolutely perfect..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...