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robdurant

Studding sail booms and yards

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Hi,

 

I've been looking through the Anatomy of the Ship book for Diana, as I prepare to turn the yards for my model. I notice that in the spar dimensions table, it mentions both studdingsail yards and studdingsail booms for lower, top, topgallant on both main and fore masts. I had assumed that the boom was the yard, so clearly I've misunderstood something. Both are in addition to the yards themselves, which have their own entries.

 

For example, the main lower studdingsail boom has a diameter of 9 1/4" and a length of 45' 8", and the main lower studdingsail yard has a diameter of 5 1/4" and a length of 26' 1", so they are clearly different spars. Could anyone shed some light, please?

 

Many thanks

 

Rob

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There are five items for each  yard that takes a stunsail, , the yard itself, the studdingsail boom port, studdingsail yard port, studdingsail boom starboard, and studdingsail yard starboard.  You can see these on the drawing on page 105 of your Diana book..  The booms slide outboard through guide rings attached to the yards.  The studdingsail yards "hang" free.  For the lower yards stunsails, the stunsail yard has a halyard seized around the stunsail yard and roves through a block seized to the outer boom iron on the foreyard.  There are also inner halyards and sheets for each stunsail.  There are very detailed drawings in Darcy Lever's Young Sea Officer's Sheet Anchor which is also reproduced in Lees'  Masting and Rigging on page 116.  In this case, the drawings truly are worth a thousand words, maybe more.

Allan

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Hi Allan,

 

Thank you so much for your quick and extremely helpful answer. As you say, the pictures say a thousand words. Not sure how I missed that diagram in AOTS. Now I feel confident to proceed. I wonder where the studdingsail yards would be kept when not in use? On the skid beams perhaps? 

 

So. For my model, I shall have the studdingsail booms represented, but as it is not rigged, the stunsail yards will not be there.

 

Thanks again

 

Rob

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Hi Rob, the various studdingsail booms were simply stored on their respective yard, but secured inboard to the actual yard with a lashing.  The lower booms are secured in the iron hoops on the forward part of the channels so they can rotate outboard - whether these were "permanently" stored there is a question.  I suspect that these would have rigged according to need, as they seem to be rather exposed and awkward alongside the hull given interference with the deadeyes - just my thoughts as can't find any reference to this.

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Rob,  Yes, the booms are secured as described by Jason, but I don't know where the stunsail yards were stowed when not in use.  Great question.

Allan

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