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Hello all.

 

What is the best stain to use on bare wood (for example on the planking on billing boats Vasa).

Is it varnish based stain, oil based stain or water based stain?

 

Jörgen

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As I understand itL

stain;  essentially a paint-like product that is a surface based material.

It is colored to match a species of wood, but it partially masks the grain

of the wood it is used on.  On raw wood, I think the system chosen is 

a preference with no objective factors favoring any one of them.

 

dye,  penetrates the wood, enhances the grain, does not limit the choice of finish.

Two types in general - alcohol base - less penetration, no effect on the wood,  drys

quickly.

water base- deeper penetration, longer drying time,  first application usually raises the grain

and requires treatment = sanding or use of a scraper.  Pre-treatment with dilute PVA in water

and sanding before dye usually negates the grain problem.

 

If you have quality wood- consider using a dye,  If the wood is not beautiful - a stain can fix that.

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Thank you for the answer Jaager. It is not quality wood but just very light (second planking material delivered in DeAgostinis Vasa kit) and I want to make it oak like so I will go for stain. I still have to choose between oil based or lacquer based. Think I have to buy them both and test them out.

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Hello Jörgen, personally, I prefer water based stain.  This would be a powder that is poured into very hot water, then stirred shortly.  Use a jar with a screw lid, and the stain will keep for many years.  Water based stain dries quickly, like within 30 minutes.

 

Please note, the wood should be stained before assembly, as it will not penetrate any glue that you may use for joining wood pieces, and the original wood color will remain visible.

 

Good luck and have fun.

 

Michael

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Jorden 

I prefer stain for most of my work,  I feel  paint hides the natural look of the wood. Water based, or oil stain really depends on the look your trying to achieve. I use both sometime mixed together.    Lacquer based stain is not very forgiving if you make a mistake, plus it will take on a shine effect.   I found the best way is allot of trail and error testing, different types of wood react differently to stains, again its all about the look you want.  Take notes on all your testing it will pay off later,    I have posted a pic of my Rattlesnake as an example of the stain effect.  

As I have said on this forum several times,  "We  build for the builder"  

MOG 

 

rs 1.jpg

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Thank you Mickgee and  Mog. Think i can skip laquer Based then. Will by water and oil to make some testing. 

Mickgee, are you staning second planks before you glue them in place? How about sanding then?

Mog, a very beautiful ship you have there.

 

Edited by Passer

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Jorgen, make sure the stain does not dry to a gloss. If it does, you will have to remove it with fine steel wool or sandpaper.

Edited by Canute

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14 hours ago, Passer said:

 

Mickgee, are you staning second planks before you glue them in place? How about sanding then?

Hi Passer, yes, stain before gluing the 2nd planks.

 

Here an example of mahogany strips that I treated with black water based stain.  The strips were stained before application.  Once glued into position, the sanded planks become a little lighter of course, but can be easily re-stained after gluing and sanding smooth.  See the lighter spot on the planks near the keel?

 

30020175pm.jpg

 

Here the same area after being re-stained and then sealed;

 

30107024gs.jpg

 

When the glue covers the previously stained planks, the stain remains as is, because the glue seals the pores, but the rest can be sanded and re-stained, no problems at all with this particular black hull.

 

Michael

 

 

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Hello Jörgen, we'd all be pleased if you let us know how things turned out.  We're always looking for other methods and materials to use so your input will be appreciated.

 

Good luck and have fun.

 

Michael

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