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Clevises - I think?


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Hi-

 

I am basically a newbie, but I've been practicing silver soldering. The picture below shows a bunch of what I think are called clevises. The plans for the build call for bunches of them. These are made with 1/64th brass wire and just as a temporary measure I've put 1/32nd brass wire with the ends pinched down to act as pins. My question is that when it comes time to do the rigging and finally install them how do I keep the pins in place.

 

All help is appreciated.

 

Best,

John

post-18302-0-12280500-1431126118.jpg

Edited by Landlocked123
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John,

 

These are more commonly known as 'shackles'.  To secure the final pins when rigging you can use any of a few methods:

  • Silver solder the pins before rigging and splice around the pin during rigging
  • Fit the pin during rigging and secure it with a tiny dab of glue
  • Fit the pin during rigging and secure with a touch of soft solder (being very careful with the soldering iron
  • Go totally crazy and purchase a jewellers tap and die set and screw the pins in

John

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RBModel has shackles, some with threaded pins, some with clevis pins (pin with a hole for a cotter pin).  I'm not sure if they go as small as you need, the smallest seems to be about 7mm tall. 

I've been dealing with these folks for years and have always been happy with their products.

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John,

 

When using a shackle, the usual method of attachment is to place the items of rigging into the shackle and then put the pin in.  If this is too difficult (especially at smaller scales) it is sometimes possible to make the shackle complete with the pin and then secure the items of rigging around it.  This presupposes that you can properly tension the items of rigging that the shackle secures.

 

John

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  • 3 weeks later...

Your shackles look great - I'd be interested to know your method for making them. How did you make the two parts that the pin goes through and what kind of fixture did you devise to hold all the bits and pieces while you soldered them together? I haven't had a lot of luck with this myself.

 

Cheers -

John

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Your shackles look great - I'd be interested to know your method for making them. How did you make the two parts that the pin goes through and what kind of fixture did you devise to hold all the bits and pieces while you soldered them together? I haven't had a lot of luck with this myself.

 

Cheers -

John

Hi John,

 

Making the shackles was actually pretty straight forward, as long as you've had some practice with silver soldering. To make the shackles I drilled two holes in plywood to hold some pins. I used some heavier guage straight pins which I think we're about 0.020" in diameter. I then took some 0.020 brass rod, annealed it and wrapped it around the pins. I trimmed the tag ends, silver soldered the loops and bent them around a mandrel to shape.

 

I just re-read what I've been writing and I think it will make a lot more sense with some pictures. Give me a couple of days.

 

John

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Pics would be great. I've got the concept but as they say, "A picture is worth a thousand words."  The part that stumped me when I tried making them was soldering the round bits (that the pin goes through) to the U-shape part. I couldn't seem to figure out a good way to hold everything together while soldering. So pics of a jig would be really helpful.

 

Thanks!

John

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John:

I just wrap the wire around the pins in the jig, forming the eyes at either end. Then I clip the excess wire off and solder the cut ends back onto the wire, thus creating the eyes. The eyes are not separate pieces, they are simply formed right on the end of the wire.

 

Russ

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Your soldering looks great and the details of your wire bending is very commendable.
 

What scale are you working with?

For me this would be a bit too big. At 1:76 the thickness of the shackle wire would equate to almost 1.4 inches and the pin double that.

Shackles I have used are about one fifth or less than that. Of course, I am talking small sail boats.

Edited by Modeler12
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Hi All,

 

Jay, I'm building in 1/48th scale so if I'm doing my math right the 1/32nd wire is 1.5 inches and .020" is about an inch.

 

John, I know Russ cleared up the confusion on my explaination but I did put together a bunch of pictures (with my usual overkill). Since I had them I thought I'd post them. Maybe they'll help someone out. I think I had enough .020 wire shackles (the first post in this topic) but I could some larger ones made from 1/32nd brass wire.

 

I thought it would be a good idea to show the tools I use:

post-18302-0-93431400-1433702184.jpg

From left to right, a small butane torch, medium silver soldering paste, wire cutters, round nose pliers, and needle nose pliers on a scrap of plywood.

 

I then drilled two pilot holes a half inch apart in the plywood tapped in a couple of pins and using a scrap of wood trimmed them to the same height. Be sure to hit the tops of the pins with a file, the cut edges are remarkably sharp.

post-18302-0-83650100-1433702684.jpg

 

I anneal the brass (heat red hot, immerse in water) and holding the end with the needle nose pliers bend around the pins as shown below.

post-18302-0-06565300-1433702843.jpgpost-18302-0-24923200-1433702864.jpg

 

Using the round nose pliers to form more uniform ends I trim the tag ends to form a closed loop. Be sure to file the ends of the wire flat and clean or it is very difficult to get a good solder joint. Also keep in mind that the loops must be COMPLETELY closed, silver solder will not bridge gaps.

post-18302-0-61307000-1433703309.jpg

 

Place in tweezers, add a tiny bit of solder paste, hit with the torch and then let it drop in a bit of water to cool.

post-18302-0-40740600-1433703464.jpgpost-18302-0-39894500-1433703489.jpgpost-18302-0-99503200-1433705196.jpg

Edited by Landlocked123
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I guess I was using up too much some thing or other and I had to split this into two posts.

 

So......

 

In order to have the eye perpendicular to the shaft, you need to "break the neck". To do so, I hold the shaft in a pair of pliers with the eye right against the side. Then with the point of a round file inserted into the loop, I bend it into position.

post-18302-0-69919400-1433704516.jpg

 

Once everything is straight, clean them up with a Dremel wire wheel, bend around a drill bit and your done.

post-18302-0-18857100-1433704904.jpgpost-18302-0-38139000-1433704947.jpgpost-18302-0-64639000-1433704968.jpg

 

Please let me know if you have any questions.

 

Best,

John

 

ps. John (Jim Lad) I took the crazy route and ordered a jewlers tap and die. Should be here any day. J.

Edited by Landlocked123
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Hi All,

 

I followed John's (Jim Ladd) advice to the crazy and picked up the mini tap and die set here:

 

post-18302-0-30392300-1433979644.jpg

 

Now....can any one help me use it? Cutting threads is pretty straight forward and easy. I was even, after quite a bit of trial and error, able to tap a hole which fit the threads. My question is basically if there a way to determine the size hole to drill for the tap? I would assume it would be the inside diameter of the thread, but how do I figure that out. I'm hoping there is something simple which has to do with the corresponding holes in the die, but right now that eludes me.

 

What I have figured out is how to create scale bolts. As soon as I get some time I'll post some pictures.

 

Best,

John

Edited by Landlocked123
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Hi All,

 

When I got home from work tonight I thought I'd spend a few minutes playing with my new toy. While I still don't know what I'm doing, I thought I would test the limits of what I could come up with. Here is the result:

 

post-18302-0-99236500-1434067169.jpg

 

I managed to make a square bolt head (it needs to be a bit thinner) and the other end actually screws into the loop. It's almost too small for my build, but I enjoyed seeing how small I could go.

 

The only negative is that my wife has said she will use this photo for proof to get the guys with the big nets to put me in the rubber room.

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